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Old 03-30-2011, 10:18 AM   #201 (permalink)
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200 posts in this thread eh. Here's something a little special for it;

An Overview Disc

^ aka an 80-minute mp3 of Elvis Costello being interviewed by the one and only Peter Doggett (whoever the hell that is) in promoting the very reissue campaign I was on about earlier. If you've got about that long to spare and don't really feel like listening to any actual music, this massively interesting interview about Costello's career up 'til this recording on July 21st 1995, his thoughts about the music scene he emerged with (the whole Mclaren thing, the Clash, Stiff Records and so on), new wave ('Polygram records invented new wave to sell a bunch of crap American records like the Runaways') and so on makes for a good listen. Definitely something for any of the hardcore fans who haven't heard it already.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainard Jalen View Post
lol. Nobody but Elvis could make a pun based on manual transmission!!!


Oh, another song I loved: Wave A White Flag off of My Aim Is True outtakes. Is it just me or does it sound like one of those 50s musichall ditties... A really odd one in the Costello oeuvre. Great lyrics.
It sounds something like that as well, just with that obvious and really brutal twist. It sounds just great in that initial version, but you should hunt down an album called Swing Is Dead by Lee Press On and the Nails, who turn it into a brass-led waltz with a male/female vocal duet - it's hilariously inappropriate given the subject of the lyric, and absolutely fantastic at that.
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Old 05-07-2011, 12:59 PM   #202 (permalink)
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Imperial Bedroom blows my mind. What a bloody great album.

At first I was thinking like, this is whack. Because it just seemed so "out there" for Elvis. But soon you get sucked in to its marvels.
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Old 05-17-2011, 01:59 PM   #203 (permalink)
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Default Pidgin English real lyrics

It is interesting to note that all lyrics sites reckon the end lyric is "PS I Love You".

Listening more carefully I am convinced that the lyric is actually "BS I Love You". This would also tie in with the cynical message of the song.

The phoneme before S you will notice has no aspiration, which is the defining characteristic of the P sound. You can hear proper aspirated Ps in the PPS I.L.O.V.E.Y.O.U. of What Would The Loved Ones Say. You cannot hear the aspiration in Pidgin English, however, so it sounds like "BS" and I am positive that it is.

Thoughts? (if anybody actually gives a damn or has ever heard the song aside from my and Bulldog!)
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Old 05-29-2011, 06:42 PM   #204 (permalink)
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From what I've heard, PS I Love You was a working title for Imperial Bedroom, so I've always just assumed that that's what the refrain at the end of Pidgin English is saying. Can definitely see what you mean though.

Which reminds me, it's been a wee bit too long since I last listened to that album...
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Old 06-02-2011, 01:38 AM   #205 (permalink)
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Thumbs up Thanks Bulldog!

This has to be one of the best thread's I've stumbled upon thus so far, "I Love Elvis Costello"! One of the greatest vocalist and songwriters of all-time.
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Old 06-08-2011, 10:39 PM   #206 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldog View Post
From what I've heard, PS I Love You was a working title for Imperial Bedroom, so I've always just assumed that that's what the refrain at the end of Pidgin English is saying. Can definitely see what you mean though.

Which reminds me, it's been a wee bit too long since I last listened to that album...
When I first heard PS I Love You, or PPS I.L.OV.E.Y.O.U in What Would The Loved Ones Say, I assumed it was all a deliberate throwback to the Beatles; it being the title of a McCartney composition and with the general associations between Imperial Bedroom and the Beatles, the coincidence was too great to resist.
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Old 09-29-2011, 03:50 PM   #207 (permalink)
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I'm bored, and this cold I've got's sucked any will to do much else out of me, so I'm gonna give this a shot;

This Thread: The ADHD Version

Been thinking about doing this for a while now, so here goes. Here I'll just sum up my thoughts on every studio album I've talked about in this thread in a few sentences, just for the sake of anyone brushing over this thing and wondering what's what as far as I'm concerned. So then, in chronological order (and modified according to what I think of each album today as opposed to a few years ago)...

My Aim Is True (1977): 4/5
Very raw, solid throughout and deserves all the acclaim it gets. Sounds a bit too similar to its influences in places though, and not as good as it got.

This Year's Model (1978): 4/5
Ups the ante by letting punk-rock tempos and guitar-heavy production into (most of) the proceedings. Solid again, but let down by a couple of very weak points.

Armed Forces (1979): 5/10
A blatant stab at a mass audience, and as such is lead by fantastic singles which are in turn surrounded by largely mediocre, overproduced album tracks. Worth it for the said highlights though.

Get Happy (1980): 9/10
In my opinion, the first truly outstanding Costello album, creating a very interesting blend of Motown and British new wave. A bit flabby, but the good far outweights the bad.

Trust (1981): 10/10
Fuckin' A.

Almost Blue (1981): 7/10
Tries my patience at times, but a fine and faithful country covers album with a very traditional feel to it. Not as knock-out awesome as it could've been though.

Imperial Bedroom (1982): 10/10
The second of the holy trinity as far as I'm concerned.

Punch the Clock (1983): 4/10
A couple of good songs, otherwise this overcooked pop album jars far too much, to the point that the horn sections start sounding like Italian traffic jams.

Goodbye Cruel World: 2/10
Oh dear...

King Of America (1986): 9/10
Much more like it. Down-to-earth, throws in a lot of Americana influences - it's the sound of an artist really enjoying himself.

Blood and Chocolate (1986): 8/10
A sister-album of sorts to This Year's Model. Very good stuff, but not one of my favourites.

Spike (1989): 8/10
I change my mind about this album a lot more than I used to. No two songs sound the same on it, which is both unique and jarring at times. Well worth a listen though.

Mighty Like a Rose (1991): 7/10
Another one I change my mind about a lot, for exactly the same reasons as Spike.

The Juliet Letters (1993) [w/ the Brodsky Quartet]: 10/10
I've regretted giving this a paltry 7 for quite a while now. A fantastic listening experience - Costello lives up to fronting a string quartet a lot better than you'd think.

Brutal Youth (1994): 6/10
Back to basics stuff. It's Elvis Costello & the Attractions on autopilot, which is decent enough, but far from brilliant.

Kojak Variety (1995): 3/10
Yawn.

Only worth it for the cover of Pouring Water On a Drowning Man.
if truth be told.

All This Useless Beauty (1996): 8/10
Very sedate and mellow by large, but also just happens to be very good as well. Another one that misses out on better marks becauase of a weak point or two.

Painted From Memory (1998) [w/ Burt Bacharach]: 7/10
Good easy listening stuff. Would've been better though had...
a) the album been divided up between new songs and old Bacharach classics, which sounded brilliant on the album's tour
b) had the final track sounded more like thye version in Grace Of My Heart

When I Was Cruel (2002): 7/10
Very experimental with electronic textures and unique, but could easily have lost a third of its tracklist and not had its impact deadened.

North (2003): 5/10
4 or 5 really lovely, melodic torch songs, but as for the rest of it...

...borrrrrring.

The Delivery Man (2004): 8/10
Kind of like a guided tour through the man's discography, and as such a very varied album stylistically. Can suffer from being a tad unfocused at times though.

The River In Reverse (2006): 9/10
Despite a couple of duff space-fillers that should never had made the album, not to mention the fact that Toussaint himself sings only one song, this is a great album.

Momofuku (2008): 6/10
Meh (see Brutal Youth).

Secret, Profane and Sugarcane (2009): 6/10
A bluegrass album, and not a bad one at that. By and large it's more interesting than actually good though.

National Ransom (2010): 8/10
(see The Delivery Man)
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Old 11-06-2011, 04:32 AM   #208 (permalink)
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You know, Elvis Costello is a bit of a mystery to me. I have about 4 of his albums, but I only listen to about 2 or 3 tracks rather regularly. I have no idea why he hasn't stuck with me yet, because I quite like those tracks and I really enjoy the general sound of albums such as Imperial Bedroom and so on and so forth. It's very odd, it just hasn't clicked yet.
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