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View Poll Results: Below the Bassline by Ernest Ranglin
Excellent 2 50.00%
Good 1 25.00%
OK 1 25.00%
Disappointing 0 0%
Awful 0 0%
Voters: 4. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-07-2012, 01:17 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Below The Bassline by Ernest Ranglin

This is a thread inviting everyone to comment on an album that recently won a FAIR club poll.

Have you heard Below the Bassline, or anything else by Ernest Ranglin ?
What did you think of it ?
Know anything about Ernest Ranglin that you`d like to share ?

Quote:
Below The Bassline by Ernest Ranglin (1996)



This is a jazzy look at some early classics of ska/reggae by Ernest Ranglin, an electric guitarist who has helped out The Wailers and Jimmy Cliff among others. On this instrumental album he fronts an acoustic band which includes some great piano playing from Jamaican legend, Monty Alexander.
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Old 05-08-2012, 08:03 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Ernest Ranglin is the man. This album is all sorts of awesome and works really well as a transition into jazz for listeners still getting used to the style. The dub reggae feel that permeate all the rhythms on the album really makes it easier for people to get sucked into Ranglin's particular jazz style, it's smooth but he's no George Benson just dripping butter on everything.

What really sets Ranglin's guitar playing apart from his contemporaries is his percussive picking style. He's got a super dry, quasi-percussive staccato attack that really distinguishes his sound. It's like the guitar picking version of a drum machine snare rush.

He was also featured on St. Germain's 2nd full length (The Tourist). Even though it was a more contemporary electro-jazz album his particular guitar style is unmistakable on his guest track (Montego Bay Spleen).
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Old 05-18-2012, 08:46 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Sorry to be so slow in responding to your post, mr dave. TBH, I was intimidated by such a knowledgeable comment about an artist and genre that I`m not familiar with !
I can at least say that I enjoyed this album a lot, even though at first I had hoped for something a bit rougher and more powerful. But I quickly came to appreciate the considered, and considerate, musicianship that has gone into this album. None of the players are swept away into crass, ego-tripping solos; they`re always working together as an ensemble that maintains a consistent but varied sound right the way through the album. No weak tracks here; just different ones catching your attention at each play through, like the irresistible beat of “ 54-46 was my number” or the delicacy of the title track. On ”Surfin`” piano player Monty even weaves in a really famous bit of classical music. I wonder if anyone can put a name to it for me?

Trying to remedy my ignorance a little, I dug into ER`s past achievements, and came across this 1970 Rocksteady song, “an anthem of the Rastafarian movement,” which ER arranged, and so is perhaps playing guitar on :



Not all the words are clear, so they are worth quoting:-

Quote:
By the rivers of Babylon, Where he sat down, And there he wept When he remembered Zion. Oh, the wicked carried us away in captivity, Required from us a song, How can we sing King Alpha's song in a strange land?
So, let the words of our mouth And the meditations of our heart Be acceptable in Thy sight. Oh, verai!
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:14 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisnaholic View Post
I can at least say that I enjoyed this album a lot, even though at first I had hoped for something a bit rougher and more powerful. But I quickly came to appreciate the considered, and considerate, musicianship that has gone into this album. None of the players are swept away into crass, ego-tripping solos; they`re always working together as an ensemble that maintains a consistent but varied sound right the way through the album.
I've been meaning to add to this thread but you have pretty much said it all there. I wasn't really blown away or anything but he is good at what he does. I was familiar with the St. Germain track so when Mr Dave mentioned the connection it was instantly recognisable as Ernest Ranglin. In all I'd say good but not essential.
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