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Old 06-08-2013, 02:50 PM   #11 (permalink)
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I just discovered this guy, and WOW. I'm really enjoying his music!

Anyone else a fan?
Huge fan. He had two of the greatest bassists--Scott LaFaro and Eddie Gomez. Can't beat that.
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:40 PM   #12 (permalink)
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I'm a fan. My favorite album of his is probably "Explorations".
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Old 07-27-2013, 11:24 AM   #13 (permalink)
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I have many Bill Evans favorites. This one is definitely on the shortlist. His reharmonization of the changes is just simply impeccable.

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Old 07-29-2013, 01:07 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Huge fan. He had two of the greatest bassists--Scott LaFaro and Eddie Gomez. Can't beat that.
Scott LaFaro was amazing. He was only 25 years old when he died and he played with many of the jazz greats of his generation: Ornette Coleman, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Stan Getz, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Art Pepper, Cal Tjander, Larry Corryell and Cannonball Adderly. Although his performing career lasted only six years, LaFaro's innovative approach to the bass redefined jazz playing, bringing an "emancipation" introducing "so many diverse possibilities as would have been thought impossible for the bass only a short time before", and inspiring a generation of bassists who followed him.

According to Scott's website:
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LaFaro died in an automobile accident in the summer of 1961 in Flint, New York on U.S. Route 20 between Geneva and Canandaigua, two days after accompanying Stan Getz at the Newport Jazz Festival. His death came just ten days after recording two live albums with the Bill Evans Trio, Sunday at the Village Vanguard and Waltz for Debby, albums considered among the finest live jazz recordings. LaFaro's death took an enormous emotional toll on Bill Evans, who was, according to drummer Paul Motian, "numb with grief," "in a state of shock," and "like a ghost" after LaFaro's death. Evans, according to Motian, would play "I Loves You Porgy", a song with which he and LaFaro became synonymous, almost obsessively, but always as a solo piece.

Evans also went on hiatus after LaFaro's death for a period of several months. Many believe that Evans never fully recovered from the loss, as well as that it contributed to his pattern of heroin usage, an addiction that would later kill him.
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Old 07-29-2013, 01:28 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Here's a cut off the Miles Davis album "Kind of Blue" (Still the best selling jazz album of all time I think) called "Blue in Green".

I think Evans playing on this is amazing. No disrespect to Miles. His playing on this is some of the most plaintive and emotionally expressive I've ever heard. But it's Evans' modal harmonic foundation that really makes the piece work.

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Old 07-29-2013, 07:09 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Here's a cut off the Miles Davis album "Kind of Blue" (Still the best selling jazz album of all time I think) called "Blue in Green".

I think Evans playing on this is amazing. No disrespect to Miles. His playing on this is some of the most plaintive and emotionally expressive I've ever heard. But it's Evans' modal harmonic foundation that really makes the piece work.

That has Paul Chambers on bass. Hometown boy and perhaps the greatest jazz bassist of them all.
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Old 07-29-2013, 07:16 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Gavin B. View Post
Scott LaFaro was amazing. He was only 25 years old when he died and he played with many of the jazz greats of his generation: Ornette Coleman, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Stan Getz, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Art Pepper, Cal Tjander, Larry Corryell and Cannonball Adderly. Although his performing career lasted only six years, LaFaro's innovative approach to the bass redefined jazz playing, bringing an "emancipation" introducing "so many diverse possibilities as would have been thought impossible for the bass only a short time before", and inspiring a generation of bassists who followed him.

According to Scott's website:
What I got from LaFaro as a bassist was his use of thirds when soloing. He did things with thirds I never even gave any thought to. To me, thirds were exercises for warming up. I did not realize how useful they were for soloing until LaFaro showed me how. He also added in passing notes to his thirds to fill them out a little and that also taught me something about how to use the bass. When most people listen to him, they just groove on what he's doing whereas I'm listening intently to hear how he ascends and descends in thirds, adds in the passing notes, carries it WAY out there in both melody and timing and then slowly works his way back in and resolves just before Evans joins back in. It's just music to most people, it's invaluable lessons to me.
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Old 08-02-2013, 12:09 PM   #18 (permalink)
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What I got from LaFaro as a bassist was his use of thirds when soloing. He did things with thirds I never even gave any thought to. To me, thirds were exercises for warming up. I did not realize how useful they were for soloing until LaFaro showed me how. He also added in passing notes to his thirds to fill them out a little and that also taught me something about how to use the bass. When most people listen to him, they just groove on what he's doing whereas I'm listening intently to hear how he ascends and descends in thirds, adds in the passing notes, carries it WAY out there in both melody and timing and then slowly works his way back in and resolves just before Evans joins back in. It's just music to most people, it's invaluable lessons to me.
What in the world are you talking about? Every jazz soloist basically uses thirds, regardless of instrument. I don't see what's so innovate about that.
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Old 08-02-2013, 01:38 PM   #19 (permalink)
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You don't have to, I do--and that's all that matters.
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Old 08-02-2013, 02:20 PM   #20 (permalink)
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When doing things like enclosures thirds are basically the standard... as well as when doing walking lines on bass or building chord voicings on piano. I can't imagine thirds being "not necessary" when playing the bass or any other instrument in jazz.
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