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Old 10-04-2021, 05:36 AM   #481 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisnaholic View Post
I just love that archer statue at East Finchley Station, Dianne. Thanks for posting it.

London is just full of curiosities, but here's something from Sheffield, if anyone wants to spend 15 mins discovering how a piece of unplanned fame infiltrated some very planned social housing:-

I was particularly Interested in that as my Twin Son is needing to move to Sheffield from Tadworth ASAP...
These films are an eye opener ...
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Old 10-11-2021, 07:39 PM   #482 (permalink)
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I'm glad you enjoyed the video Dianne. I imagine we've both seen plenty of flats like those in our time! Hope your son finds his feet in Sheffield.
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Here's an article that reports on the recent publication of a seven-vol book about African architecture:-

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-58855205

They've chosen 12 photos/12 buildings. As the oldest building is from 3 000 B.C., their choices represent a certain amount of narrowing down from five thousand years of construction.
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Old 10-17-2021, 02:00 PM   #483 (permalink)
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yes amazing some of them, a few left me cold.
Still do not know how they managed to build so well so so long ago...without what is available in our times must have cost a lot of lives....
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Old 10-17-2021, 02:02 PM   #484 (permalink)
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The George Inn, Norton St Philip, Somerset.




The George Inn at Norton St Philip (above) claims to have had a licence to serve ale from 1397 and identifies itself as Britain’s oldest tavern! The George has a long and interesting history. The diarist Samuel Pepys passed through here on his way to Bath from Salisbury. Later in 1685 during the Duke of Monmouth’s Rebellion, the inn was used as the headquarters of his army as they retreated from Bath. After the rebellion failed, the infamous Judge Jefferies used the inn as a courtroom during the Bloody Assizes; twelve people were then taken and executed on the village common.
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Old 10-17-2021, 02:05 PM   #485 (permalink)
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The Old Bell Hotel, Malmesbury, Wiltshire.




As for England’s oldest hotel, the Old Bell Hotel at Malmesbury (pictured above) lays claim to this title. The hotel dates from 1220 and is reputed to be England’s oldest purpose-built hotel. Situated adjacent to the magnificent 12th Century abbey, it was originally used as a guest house for visiting monks. Part of the hotel may have been built on the abbey churchyard, and the hotel is indeed reputed to be haunted by, amongst others, a Grey Lady.
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Old 10-17-2021, 02:09 PM   #486 (permalink)
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The Mermaid Inn, Rye, East Sussex.




The Mermaid Inn at Rye is the epitome of a smugglers’ inn, with cellars built in Norman times and secret passageways in some of its rooms. Originally constructed in 1156, this ancient inn was rebuilt in 1420! Enjoy a drink in the favourite haunt of the notorious Hawkhurst Gang of smugglers in the 1730s. This grand old hostelry simply oozes history and character

I have been to this one many times in the past.....Use to camp in Winchlesea with the family and that is Near to Rye..
Cobble streets and lots of character.....
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Old 10-17-2021, 06:21 PM   #487 (permalink)
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Three very attractive places Dianne! The last one reminded me of a very special week that I once spent in Rye; it's a nice town.

All the history that goes with The George inn is interesting, and the "Britain's oldest tavern" made me smile, as I have been to another pub in Nottingham that makes a similar claim:-



"Ye Old Trip To Jerusalem" is built up hard against a cliff of rock, on top of which Nottingham Castle is located. The pub's strange name? Because it was where Crusaders used to muster before setting off for "The Holy Land".

I wonder how many "oldest pubs" Britain has?
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Old 10-26-2021, 03:06 PM   #488 (permalink)
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https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/20...o-their-claims
seems to depend on the author sometimes, these 15 and the 8 list are at least the same names...

https://www.oldest.org/food/pubs-england

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Old 11-27-2021, 09:11 AM   #489 (permalink)
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^ Some really great old pubs in that first link, Dianne! Very nice photos. Thanks.
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The beautiful Singer Tower in New York was built in 1908, and was, for one year, the tallest building in the world. I think with today's eyes we can see immediately that it's too high or too ornate, and indeed that was its undoing: all that complex masonary so high up (600 plus feet) became too dangerous/expensive to maintain. In 1967 it was demolished,; a process in itself that was very tricky and took two years, just because NewYorkers didn't want elephant-sized bits of masonry falling onto the traffic in the surrounding streets.

One thing to notice: if you cover the bottom two-thirds of the first picture with your hand, you are looking at something that could be a street scene in an old European town, and that's what the Singer Tower illustrates; how early skyscapers took their aesthetics from the old world and created some weird hybrids before the "glass box" style won out, because of its practical and economic advantages.

Also, to get an idea of scale: best seen in the middle photo, the bit on top, above the grey sloping roof and surrounded by a square white parapet, is, in itself, the height of a four-storey building!
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Old 12-24-2021, 09:01 AM   #490 (permalink)
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I was reading a local magazine, an article on The Green Man..it comes in many forms...The Gates above in St.Paul's Cathedral, crafted by the Highly skilled JeanTijou a French Huguenot whose work is said to be entirely in the UK. Within the gates are somewhere a Green Man.

This one is in Wales is created yearly and burnt at the Green Man Music and Arts Festival, held in the Brecon Beacons.



Green Men are usually found on religious buildings but not always: the Green Man is also a popular name for English inns and pubs!

However the Green Man is an example of how images from the Old Religion were brought into Christian churches before the Reformation, and is one of the most ancient, pagan symbols to be found in the Christian church.

Pre-Christian pagan traditions and superstitions, particularly those related to nature andtree worship, were still influential in the early Middle Ages. It is therefore perhaps not surprising that the Green Man seems to appear most often in places where there are stretches of ancient woodland, for example in Devon and Somerset and on the edges of the forest areas of Yorkshire and the Midlands.

Lady Raglan suggested that in antiquity, the Green Man was ‘the central figure in the May Day celebrations throughout Northern and Central Europe’. As the Green Man is also portrayed with acorns and hawthorn leaves, symbols of fertility in medieval times, this would seem to reinforce the association with spring.

Related figures such as Jack in the Green and Green George appear much later in our folklore. The earliest record of a Jack in the Green appears in The Morning Chronicle and London Advertiser in 1775.[/IMG]
That one is near Poitier's..Cathedral is Saint Pierre a 13th Century Gothic one.


Over 30 other 'Green Man' sculptures, mostlywithin Cathedrals/Churches around France.


In the UK somewhere...
the article I read said there was one on the Palace of Westminster, some of the Oxford Colleges and Kew Gardens one called the Leaf Face.

The Green Man
by Ellen Castelow
Glance upwards as you approach or enter many of Britain’s great cathedrals and churches, and it is more than likely you will catch sight of the Green Man gazing looking down at you.

But who is this strange green figure, surrounded by foliage, often with leaves spilling forth from his mouth?

The name ‘Green Man’ was first used by Lady Raglan in March 1939 in an article she wrote for the ‘Folklore’ journal; before this, they had been known just as ‘foliate heads’ and no-one had paid them any particular attention.



Green Men are usually found on religious buildings but not always: the Green Man is also a popular name for English inns and pubs!

However the Green Man is an example of how images from the Old Religion were brought into Christian churches before the Reformation, and is one of the most ancient, pagan symbols to be found in the Christian church.

Pre-Christian pagan traditions and superstitions, particularly those related to nature andtree worship, were still influential in the early Middle Ages. It is therefore perhaps not surprising that the Green Man seems to appear most often in places where there are stretches of ancient woodland, for example in Devon and Somerset and on the edges of the forest areas of Yorkshire and the Midlands.

Lady Raglan suggested that in antiquity, the Green Man was ‘the central figure in the May Day celebrations throughout Northern and Central Europe’. As the Green Man is also portrayed with acorns and hawthorn leaves, symbols of fertility in medieval times, this would seem to reinforce the association with spring.

Related figures such as Jack in the Green and Green George appear much later in our folklore. The earliest record of a Jack in the Green appears in The Morning Chronicle and London Advertiser in 1775.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Man

Last edited by DianneW; 12-24-2021 at 09:12 AM.
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