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Old 03-05-2012, 09:07 AM   #121 (permalink)
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From now on I am basing all future judgments on whether or not a particular solo would sound good backed by a mariachi band.
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Old 03-05-2012, 09:56 AM   #122 (permalink)
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Alright, now we're talking. Fine Blastinga is talking about the whole picture, but all those variables come together to create one sound, not multiple sounds. So you have tuning, and relativity, and blends, and bends, whether its a strat or a fender...but thats all one note.

So is it really the culmination that creates the sound, or the sounds together. If that solo was backed up by, say, a mariachi band, would it be just as good? Do we know? Does its duration constitute something less than a whole melody? Why don't we ever talk this deep-down about stuff? Its where the real stuff is.

Don't you quit on me, Freebase. Don't you ****ing quit on me.
Yea, I would tend to say that while there are many great (and great sounding) guitar solos out there, the solo, while containing multiple notes, is still only one element of a larger whole. I don't define a song by its solo or lack of a solo, and tend to view a solo as only one of the legs supporting the expression of an idea. In the case of the particular solo Blastingas is talking about, I think its a leg that just stands, maybe not the fanciest leg, and it's certainly not the only leg, and one could probably saw it off and the other legs would be fine on their own.

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From now on I am basing all future judgments on whether or not a particular solo would sound good backed by a mariachi band.
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:00 AM   #123 (permalink)
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Yea, I would tend to say that while there are many great (and great sounding) guitar solos out there, the solo, while containing multiple notes, is still only one element of a larger whole. I don't define a song by its solo or lack of a solo, and tend to view a solo as only one of the legs supporting the expression of an idea. In the case of the particular solo Blastingas is talking about, I think its a leg that just stands, maybe not the fanciest leg, and it's certainly not the only leg, and one could probably saw it off and the other legs would be fine on their own.
I think it's not a even a leg. It's some little ornamental knob that you wouldn't even notice unless you happened to be crawling around under the table.
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:06 AM   #124 (permalink)
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From now on I am basing all future judgments on whether or not a particular solo would sound good backed by a mariachi band.


I can't believe the discussion on how good or bad the riff (because that's what it is, simply) in "Taxman" is, and all other minutiae to do with it lasted for 3 or so pages.

Continue on with your next review, Janszoon.
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:13 AM   #125 (permalink)
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:38 AM   #126 (permalink)
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I especially loved the horns on "Something".
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:51 AM   #127 (permalink)
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I can't believe the discussion on how good or bad the riff (because that's what it is, simply) in "Taxman" is, and all other minutiae to do with it lasted for 3 or so pages.

Continue on with your next review, Janszoon.
I can't believe it took this long to get a discussion going that made me get excited. For one brief shining moment, some of MB stepped into my wheelhouse - and I was happy.
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Old 03-05-2012, 12:00 PM   #128 (permalink)
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Talking of Taxman's bass line...



I don't really like Taxman either, and I am not even that big on that Jam song, but the bass line saves them both.
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Old 03-05-2012, 12:12 PM   #129 (permalink)
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That might be my favourite Jam song, one of the few I enjoy. I prefer it to Taxman I think.
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Old 03-05-2012, 09:59 PM   #130 (permalink)
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Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

I was actually sent this album by two people, two different ways: as a single 40 minute track from skaltezon (the theory being that it helped preserve the flow of the album better) and as a normal collection of thirteen tracks from Burning Down. Thanks to you both! I listened to it both ways and honestly didn't perceive any difference, but it was an interesting experiment.

Sgt. Pepper was a very different animal for me from the other two albums I've reviewed so far because I'm much more familiar with it, though it's probably been close to twenty years since I've listened to the whole thing. It starts strong with the titular track—certainly one of the great intro songs in rock history and a noticeable influence on everything from Pink Floyd's "In the Flesh?" to Primus' "The Return of Sathington Willoughby"—and proceeds at a relatively steady level of quality all the way through to the end. Some songs are certainly better than others but there are no clunkers.

What was interesting for me though, revisiting this album as an adult and analyzing much more than I would have twenty years ago, was all the detail I picked up on. "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", for example, (a song I've probably heard several thousand times in my life) stood out in terms of its interesting instrumentation despite the ridiculous lyrics. The relatively simple and straightforward "Fixing a Hole" was noteworthy to me for its incredibly tight and catchy songwriting. "She's Leaving Home" joins the crowd of really good, and generally bittersweet, Beatles songs I had forgotten about. "Within Without You" plays like a sister track to Revolver's "Love to You", though maybe not quite as good. "When I'm Sixty-Four" made me laugh, as it always does, when I found myself wondering about how Paul McCartney feels about those lyrics now that he's past that age. "Lovely Rita", one of my favorite tracks listening to the album now, surprised me by being the only Beatles song I can think of that's really carried by its interestingly interlocking rhythms. "Good Morning Good Morning" is quirky, with some very interesting textural qualities, which plays a little like a single-song response to the entire album of Pet Sounds. And at the very end, of course, is "A Day in the Life", a great evocative and melancholy track that I've always liked a lot—the Lennon parts much more so than the McCartney parts.

All in all, I think this is the most consistent of the albums I've reviewed so far. I'm not sure I'd say it's the best necessarily, but it's certainly the most cohesive. I could probably name more truly great songs on either Abbey Road or Revolver than on this but then I could probably also name more weak tracks on either of those albums too.

Up next: Rubber Soul
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i'm not gonna spend my life on music banter trying to convince people the earth is flat.
A Night in the Life of the Invisible Man

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25 Albums You Should Hear Before the Moon Crashes into the Earth and We All Die


last.fm
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