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VEGANGELICA 04-26-2011 09:39 PM

Classical Music used for Dancing
 
What classical music pieces are made especially memorable for you because of the dances (ballet, ice skating routines, or others) choreographed with them in mind?

For clarity's sake, I'm using this definition of classical music:

Quote:

Classical music is the art music produced in, or rooted in, the traditions of Western liturgical and secular music, encompassing a broad period from roughly the 11th century to present times.

The major time divisions of classical music are the early music period, which includes Medieval (500–1400) and Renaissance (1400–1600), the Common practice period, which includes the Baroque (1600–1750), Classical (1750–1830) and Romantic (1815–1910) periods, and the modern and contemporary period, which includes 20th century (1900–2000) and contemporary (1975–current). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_music
...but if you can think of dances set to Indian classical music or Japanese traditional music, etc., that's fine by me! :)

Three of my favorites:

Ravel - "Bolero" - ice skating routine by Torvill & Dean that won them the 1984 Olympics Ice Dance Gold Medal.

I remember watching this performance and feeling very excited by it. The routine was beloved by almost everyone I knew at the time! This music/dance combination helped inspire me to get involved in modern dance, which I enjoyed for 12 years.

Interestingly, the French composer, Maurice Ravel, felt "Bolero" (1928) was "trivial and once described [it] as 'a piece for orchestra without music.' " Maurice Ravel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Tchaikowsky - Nutcracker Ballet - "Dance of the Snowflakes" and "Sugar Plum Fairy." I never tire of watching this ballet with its beautiful music...and I must have seen it at least 8 times. :)




Burning Down 04-26-2011 09:57 PM

I love how there is so much beautiful music to accompany dance numbers. I should know a bunch off the top of my head seeing as I used to take ballet and other dance lessons. I'll get back with my selections tomorrow!

Neapolitan 04-26-2011 10:03 PM

I was introduce to Ravel by an unlikely source - The Ventures. It was featured on their Joy album which featured instrumental rock versions of art music, it was probably the first Classic Rock album to be released j/k:D.

Ravel's Pavanne - The Ventures

There were two youtube videos that featured Pavane pour une infante défunte one was still-pic of the painting Lake George, by John Frederick Kensett and this one. I thought you might like this video because it fits in well with your topic.

VEGANGELICA 04-26-2011 10:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Burning Down (Post 1043245)
I love how there is so much beautiful music to accompany dance numbers. I should know a bunch off the top of my head seeing as I used to take ballet and other dance lessons. I'll get back with my selections tomorrow!

That would be great, Burning Down, because I haven't seen many ballets...mostly just the same one over and over! :p: I'd like to be familiar with more ballets than *just* The Nutcracker, great as it is.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neapolitan (Post 1043249)
I was introduce to Ravel by an unlikely source - The Ventures. It was featured on their Joy album which featured instrumental rock versions of art music, it was probably the first Classic Rock album to be released j/k:D.

Ravel's Pavanne - The Ventures

There were two youtube videos that featured Pavane pour une infante défunte one was still-pic of the painting Lake George, by John Frederick Kensett and this one. I thought you might like this video because it fits in well with your topic.

The Ventures' song was fun!

And the video *does* fit in perfectly with my topic. Thank you, Neapolitan, for sharing it. The dancing definitely makes the swimming, amorphous music more memorable for me as the dancer/actress, Patricia Blair, moves from nature to the city and finally to the studio in this modern ballet piece that I suspect was choreographed just for her, since the choreographer was Martin Vincent Blair (who I think was her husband). Patricia Blair is still alive. She's 80 now! :)

Zaqarbal 04-27-2011 02:38 AM

Manuel de Falla: El amor brujo ("Love, the Magician"). First composed as a symphonic suite, and then as a ballet too. Two of its best-known movements are #8 (Ritual Fire Dance) and #10 (Song of the Will-o'-the-Wisp). This video is from a film based on the ballet:



But, of course, you can also stare at a bonfire, and you'll see how fire dances in time to the music. ;)

Howard the Duck 04-27-2011 03:46 AM

nothing beats The Blue Danube Waltz

I enjoyed Swan Lake tremendously

VEGANGELICA 04-27-2011 10:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zaqarbal (Post 1043369)
Manuel de Falla: El amor brujo ("Love, the Magician"). First composed as a symphonic suite, and then as a ballet too. Two of its best-known movements are #8 (Ritual Fire Dance) and #10 (Song of the Will-o'-the-Wisp). This video is from a film based on the ballet:



But, of course, you can also stare at a bonfire, and you'll see how fire dances in time to the music. ;)

Wow! That is *lovely*, Zaqarbal. So dramatic and intense. Hot hot hot!!! You Spanish people, you know how to dance, don't you! I love the sensual flamenco style, the swish of the skirts that sounds like licking flames, and the dragging and stamping of the feet.

I read the plot of the story, and this dance makes perfect sense now that I know the story. I think this clip ends with Lucia dancing with the ghost of Jose to exorcise him from the earth so that he stops haunting his ex-wife whom he married in an arranged marriage while his heart was really with Lucia. This ballet makes "The Nutcracker" romance between a pre-adolescent girl and a...nutcracker...seem rather bland. :/

Quote:

Originally Posted by Il Duce (Post 1043386)
nothing beats The Blue Danube Waltz

I enjoyed Swan Lake tremendously

Duce, what YouTube video of "Swan Lake" shows your favorite section?

Burning Down 04-27-2011 10:52 AM

I love On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An Der Schöen Blauen Donau) by Johann Strauss II.



and here's a fun Simpsons take on that piece:



I also like Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake, in particular the Neapolitan Dance:



When I was a kid, we did a ballet dance routine to Léo Delibes' Suite from Sylvia: Pizzicato. You may know this piece from the movie Babe, when Babe was fooling around with the paint cans and the yarn.



And finally, for some 20th century ballet: Igor Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. Here's some of it (well the first part!)


Howard the Duck 04-27-2011 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VEGANGELICA (Post 1043639)
Wow!
Duce, what YouTube video of "Swan Lake" shows your favorite section?

I got a Finlandic production - probably not on youtube, it's probably Act 2 Scene 1 - as the Prince wanders out and finds the Swan Princess, with Mephisto lurking in the backgrund

VEGANGELICA 05-07-2011 05:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Burning Down (Post 1043657)
I love On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An Der Schöen Blauen Donau) by Johann Strauss II....

Thank you for all those additions to the thread, Burning Down!

I didn't know Léo Delibes' Suite from Sylvia: Pizzicato was used in the movie Babe, when Babe was fooling around with the paint cans and the yarn. :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Il Duce (Post 1043661)
I got a Finlandic production - probably not on youtube, it's probably Act 2 Scene 1 - as the Prince wanders out and finds the Swan Princess, with Mephisto lurking in the backgrund

I couldn't find the Finlandic production, but here's another professional production (Ballet of the Kirov Theatre St. Petersburg) of Swan Lake, Act 2 Scene 1, that I'm watching now to see what it is like since you recommend it. Beautiful music.

My only complaint with the choreography is that there is an awful lot of arm/wing flapping! :p: I know they're swans and all, but still...when you've seen 10 flaps, 1000 gets a little tiring.



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