Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The MB Reader > Album Reviews
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-07-2011, 08:20 PM   #1 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Colorado!
Posts: 3
Default Mumford & Sons - Sigh No More

Hey all! This is my first music review; my boyfriend wanted me to write one for his website, The Tune. Please tear it apart (or give it nice, constructive criticism haha), as he wants me to write more, but I don't think I'm up to speed yet. Any comments would be greatly appreciated

By now, if you haven't heard the name "Mumford & Sons," you may be living in a cave with your fingers in your ears. With only one album, they’ve hovered at the top of the U.K. charts for 72 straight weeks, as well as earning high spots in all the other predominantly English-speaking countries—you can’t turn on a radio in the U.S. without hearing “Little Lion Man” at least once nowadays. This London-based quartet has tapped into the popular masses playing catchy folk with naught but a bass drum and a tambourine as their percussion on most of their songs, still somehow urging the listener to bounce up and down or headbang while listening.

Sigh No More is deliciously rife with musical explosions that are surprising on the first few listens, and once you get used to them, you wait on the edge of your seat for them and have a braingasm when the wall hits you. In the cases of “Little Lion Man” and “Roll Away Your Stone,” two of the four singles on the album, “Country” Winston Marshall’s insane banjo playing carries these intense moments rhythmically much further than any other instrument; in calmer songs such as “White Blank Page” and “I Gave You All,” the peaks are more gradual and paced, pulling the listener through the entire song despite the slower tempo.

Although Mumford is the lead, each of the members’ voices can be distinctly heard during invigorating choruses, as they all have a unique melodic line that enriches rather than overburdens the listener with noise. This makes them able to get away with just singing an open “ahhh” on a few tracks without becoming boring, and when they go a capella, there’s nothing to do but bask in it.

Apart from the fact that they subtly lifted lines from Shakespeare and Hemingway, many of Mumford & Sons’s lyrics are simple yet so well-crafted that each song allows the listener to glean a story from them in their own minds. “Dust Bowl Dance” is one of the few on the album that doesn’t leave much room for personal imagination, but it still touches on the universal issue of unequal wealth distribution, as Mumford asks “One man has and the other has not/ How can you love what it is you have got?”

“After The Storm” is a standout track, using no percussion whatsoever, a guitar, and Marcus Mumford’s gentle vocals. It’s certainly not the only one in which love is mentioned, but it seems to be more personal, and it is perfect to listen to after a quarrel - “Love will not break your heart, but dismiss your fears,” Mumford sings amongst other romantic postulations that ultimately are about humbling yourself before the harsh world and helping your partner to survive.

The title track, “Sigh No More,” also declares that “love, it will not betray you, dismay, or enslave you/ It will set you free”, but it seems to invoke love for your fellow man – it’s definitely the feel-good song on the album. The slow fade-in of Mumford’s guitar eases the listener into the music, and each instrument adds itself on seamlessly, introducing their musical style so well that no other song could have worked as the first track.

Considering none of these musicians owned their own instruments when they started recording, the aspects of their composition are simply astounding. They have managed to create music that is diverse and exciting, with simple, down-to-earth themes that don’t extrapolate or understate – the perfect recipe for our fast-paced world, when all we need is something attention-getting that makes us slow down and think a little.
ediebutt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 10:09 AM   #2 (permalink)
Neo-Maxi-Zoom-Dweebie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: So-Cal
Posts: 3,653
Default

I liked em better when they were called DAVE MATHEWS BAND.
FRED HALE SR. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 03:46 PM   #3 (permalink)
Exo
All day jazz and biscuits
 
Exo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 5,133
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FRED HALE SR. View Post
I liked em better when they were called DAVE MATHEWS BAND.
Haha, I remember MY first beer.
__________________
LastFM
My Film Blog That I don't Write in Anymore
jsmith7389 on Spotify
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Wilkes Booth View Post
ants are at every zoo you ever been to bitch
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultHawk View Post
elph

would you kiss the vagina of a woman who asked you to switch off half japanese?
Exo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2011, 06:01 AM   #4 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 2
Default

This is purely amazing album.. Can recommend to all - and doesnt get old, EVER!
Teemu Kainulainen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2011, 01:13 PM   #5 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North East England
Posts: 72
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ediebutt View Post
Hey all! This is my first music review; my boyfriend wanted me to write one for his website, The Tune. Please tear it apart (or give it nice, constructive criticism haha), as he wants me to write more, but I don't think I'm up to speed yet. Any comments would be greatly appreciated

By now, if you haven't heard the name "Mumford & Sons," you may be living in a cave with your fingers in your ears. With only one album, they’ve hovered at the top of the U.K. charts for 72 straight weeks, as well as earning high spots in all the other predominantly English-speaking countries—you can’t turn on a radio in the U.S. without hearing “Little Lion Man” at least once nowadays. This London-based quartet has tapped into the popular masses playing catchy folk with naught but a bass drum and a tambourine as their percussion on most of their songs, still somehow urging the listener to bounce up and down or headbang while listening.

Sigh No More is deliciously rife with musical explosions that are surprising on the first few listens, and once you get used to them, you wait on the edge of your seat for them and have a braingasm when the wall hits you. In the cases of “Little Lion Man” and “Roll Away Your Stone,” two of the four singles on the album, “Country” Winston Marshall’s insane banjo playing carries these intense moments rhythmically much further than any other instrument; in calmer songs such as “White Blank Page” and “I Gave You All,” the peaks are more gradual and paced, pulling the listener through the entire song despite the slower tempo.

Although Mumford is the lead, each of the members’ voices can be distinctly heard during invigorating choruses, as they all have a unique melodic line that enriches rather than overburdens the listener with noise. This makes them able to get away with just singing an open “ahhh” on a few tracks without becoming boring, and when they go a capella, there’s nothing to do but bask in it.

Apart from the fact that they subtly lifted lines from Shakespeare and Hemingway, many of Mumford & Sons’s lyrics are simple yet so well-crafted that each song allows the listener to glean a story from them in their own minds. “Dust Bowl Dance” is one of the few on the album that doesn’t leave much room for personal imagination, but it still touches on the universal issue of unequal wealth distribution, as Mumford asks “One man has and the other has not/ How can you love what it is you have got?”

“After The Storm” is a standout track, using no percussion whatsoever, a guitar, and Marcus Mumford’s gentle vocals. It’s certainly not the only one in which love is mentioned, but it seems to be more personal, and it is perfect to listen to after a quarrel - “Love will not break your heart, but dismiss your fears,” Mumford sings amongst other romantic postulations that ultimately are about humbling yourself before the harsh world and helping your partner to survive.

The title track, “Sigh No More,” also declares that “love, it will not betray you, dismay, or enslave you/ It will set you free”, but it seems to invoke love for your fellow man – it’s definitely the feel-good song on the album. The slow fade-in of Mumford’s guitar eases the listener into the music, and each instrument adds itself on seamlessly, introducing their musical style so well that no other song could have worked as the first track.

Considering none of these musicians owned their own instruments when they started recording, the aspects of their composition are simply astounding. They have managed to create music that is diverse and exciting, with simple, down-to-earth themes that don’t extrapolate or understate – the perfect recipe for our fast-paced world, when all we need is something attention-getting that makes us slow down and think a little.
Thanks for the good review. I can certainly recommend this record with confidence, it's got some very good stuff on it. I managed to get the cd online for £3-99 a few weeks ago, one of the best bargains I've ever found.
GERD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2011, 03:27 PM   #6 (permalink)
Such That
 
Bane of your existence's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Austin, Tx
Posts: 1,193
Default

I love the album, but where the shit do they get off charging $160 for a general admission ticket to their show? They're not fucking Rhianna.

/rant
Bane of your existence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2011, 09:30 AM   #7 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North East England
Posts: 72
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bane of your existence View Post
I love the album, but where the shit do they get off charging $160 for a general admission ticket to their show? They're not fucking Rhianna.

/rant
160?? That is pretty outrageous, I haven't got 160 to my name, nevermind to spend on a ticket!!
GERD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2011, 11:02 AM   #8 (permalink)
\/ GOD
 
Ska Lagos Jew Sun Ra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Nowhere...
Posts: 2,161
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bane of your existence View Post
I love the album, but where the shit do they get off charging $160 for a general admission ticket to their show? They're not fucking Rhianna.

/rant
lame...

Can't really say much. They're ok, trendy... eh.
__________________
Quote:
Terence Hill, as recently confirmed during an interview to an Italian TV talk-show, was offered the role but rejected it because he considered it "too violent". Dustin Hoffman and John Travolta declined the role for the same reason. When Al Pacino was considered for the role of John Rambo, he turned it down when his request that Rambo be more of a madman was rejected.
Al Pacino = God
Ska Lagos Jew Sun Ra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2011, 06:16 AM   #9 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bane of your existence View Post
I love the album, but where the shit do they get off charging $160 for a general admission ticket to their show? They're not fucking Rhianna.

/rant

True, they dont need to pay all these very expensive sound engineer Rihanna uses to make it sound like she's actually a very good singer...
If you're ready to pay that amount of money for a playback singer, how about paying the same for a truly amazing band!?

That said, I agree this seems like a stupidly high price. I saw them at Hop farm Festival in England last summer, and payed like $60 for the whole day which also included Bob Dylan, Ray Davies, Seasick Steve, Laura Marling, Devendrah Banhart,...
Konoba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2011, 02:56 PM   #10 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
ilashes.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Arctic Tundra
Posts: 65
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Konoba View Post
True, they dont need to pay all these very expensive sound engineer Rihanna uses to make it sound like she's actually a very good singer...
If you're ready to pay that amount of money for a playback singer, how about paying the same for a truly amazing band!?

That said, I agree this seems like a stupidly high price. I saw them at Hop farm Festival in England last summer, and payed like $60 for the whole day which also included Bob Dylan, Ray Davies, Seasick Steve, Laura Marling, Devendrah Banhart,...

$60.00 and you got to see that line up? Looks like i'll be making a trip to England next summer.

I couldnt' afford to go to their show here either, tickets weren't quite $160 but they were like $120 for the 80th row which is insanity. I am glad I didn't go, I don't think I would enjoy their music or more specifically this album performed in a concert setting. I would want that.. sitting in the tall grass, eating a corn dog and jammin' festival kind of feel. That would make it hit home for me.
__________________
Cellar Door
ilashes. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.