Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Classical
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-05-2011, 08:41 AM   #101 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 30
Default

My library is huge and I off the top of my head...

Ceasar Franc come to mind. More choral peices than anything. But his organ works are incredble. Deep...moving music.

Look up preludium en fugue in D I believe. (I could be mistaken)

a must find tho!!!
antiboredom101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2011, 11:04 PM   #102 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 9
Default

Vivaldi , really smooth to listen to
Thecrazyone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 08:31 PM   #103 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Zaqarbal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Spain
Posts: 823
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGANGELICA View Post
Hmm...Goya's paintings show what appears to be a much more exciting social scene than Madrid has in modern times, where the desolate street at night is streaked (artistically) only by the lights of cars!
Because I took that photo in March. But now it's summertime. Weather is hot, and, as you can see, several kinds of eyecatching flowers have sprouted up everywhere: at the old quarter, by the river, at University campus, in parks and gardens, etc...



So the famous Boccherini's minuet seems to be very appropriate right now. BTW, at last there is a thread about him: http://www.musicbanter.com/classical...43-1805-a.html

---------------

Apart from that: Since I mentioned the genre named Zarzuela, I'd like to recommend two of its main composers.

* Ruperto Chapí (1851-1909):




* Tomás Bretón (1850-1923):



__________________
"Lullabies for adults / crossed by the years / carry the flower of disappointment / tattooed in their gloomy melodies."

Last edited by Zaqarbal; 07-22-2011 at 09:07 PM.
Zaqarbal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2011, 11:33 PM   #104 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaqarbal View Post
He's a very original musician, indeed. For instance, when he was entrusted with the composition of music for an operetta entitled Clementina, he did it in a particular Madrilenian style named Zarzuela. The story has reminiscences of one of those ancient Greek tragedies, but its characters are based on the late 18th-century nobility, and it contains some humorous elements.

Boccherini included elements from Spanish popular music into many of his compositions. For instance, fandangos. Which, by the way, had a reputation for being "lascivious" dances at the time, to some aristocrats. I've just taken out a very interesting biography of Boccherini from a library, and I've read some fun details there. To show how succesful fandangos were then, the book quotes Giacomo Casanova (you know, the famous Italian "playboy"). Casanova was in Madrid in 1767-1768, and he attended a concert together with a local noble lady (I guess he seduced her before ):

...


It seems he was really impressed! I don't know how that particular fandango sounded exactly. But we can listen to this one composed by Boccherini in the 1790's. Quintet no.4 (G.448). Played with castanets (it begins at min. 0:16):

Casanova certainly did sound impressed by the fandango he viewed: "I was so excited at this Bacchanalian spectacle that I burst out into cries of delight."

I love the video of Boccherini's fandango! (Delighted cries!) I like how the dancer is also a musician, since the castanets cause her to become the percussion section. The musicians all played very well. A lovely performance. (By the way, I have been to Lenzburg, where the video of Boccherini Quintet no. 4 was made.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaqarbal View Post
Yes, I'm gonna start a Boccherini thread myself.
I saw the new thread! Good job, Zaqarbal. I've been thinking of what to add to it. And you posted the photos of Boccherini's houses, too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaqarbal View Post
Because I took that photo in March. But now it's summertime. Weather is hot, and, as you can see, several kinds of eyecatching flowers have sprouted up everywhere: at the old quarter, by the river, at University campus, in parks and gardens, etc...

Flowers, indeed!

The summer photos make the historic district in Madrid look much livelier than in March. I believe Goya's festive paintings now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaqarbal View Post
Apart from that: Since I mentioned the genre named Zarzuela, I'd like to recommend two of its main composers. . . .
I have been reading about Zarzuela on Wikipedia. They sound rather like operetta musicals with unique Spanish cultural elements. The article mentioned this famous Zarzuela composer, Federico Chueca, "whose La gran vía (composed with Joaquín Valverde Durán) was a cult success both in Spain and throughout Europe." The singers have very good voices in my opinion:

Federico Chueca and Joaquín Valverde Durán, "Vals del Caballero de Gracia" from "La gran via," a Zarzuela

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"

Last edited by VEGANGELICA; 07-23-2011 at 11:41 PM.
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.