Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Classical
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-29-2010, 10:46 AM   #1 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Zaqarbal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Spain
Posts: 823
Default 150 years of Isaac Albéniz

The Google drawing (doodle) has reminded me this anniversary. May 29th. On today's date back in 1860, Isaac Albéniz was born.

A child prodigy, he started to play piano at the age of four. His most famous works, both for piano, are Suite Iberia and Suite Española Op. 47. According to French expert Olivier Messiaen:
Quote:
"Iberia is the wonder for the piano; it is perhaps on the highest place among the most brilliant pieces for the king of the instruments.”
Musicians say they are very complex compositions, and ones of the most difficult piano works to play ever. I'm totally ignorant of those technical subjects, but to me, their musical evocations are simply A-M-A-Z-I-N-G (can't find the words).

They say the best performer of Albéniz's works was Alicia de Larrocha. Who was Alicia de Larrocha? Well, Dudley Moore tell us. Now, here she plays Corpus in Seville (Book I) and Triana (Book II) from Suite Iberia:



Two excerpts more from Suite Iberia: Albaicín (Book 3) and Eritaña (Book 4), also by De Larrocha:




Regarding the Suite Española, perhaps its best known piece is Asturias. Apart from this, another Albéniz's piece I like very much is Mallorca (Op. 202). Alicia de Larrocha, once again:




There have been made arrangements for guitar. So, for example, we can also listen to John Williams (the Australian guitarist, not the film-music composer ) making an awesome performance. Even The Doors included fragments of Asturias in Spanish Caravan:



__________________
"Lullabies for adults / crossed by the years / carry the flower of disappointment / tattooed in their gloomy melodies."

Last edited by Zaqarbal; 05-29-2010 at 11:02 AM. Reason: A typo
Zaqarbal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2010, 12:04 PM   #2 (permalink)
Juicious Maximus III
 
tore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Scabb Island
Posts: 5,935
Default

Brilliant! Thanks for the education

This is not entirely unfamiliar, at least there are some familiar sounds here (Asturias) .. I'm definetly gonna take some of the information in this thread and do a little diggin'!
__________________
In the age of information, ignorance is a choice.
tore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2010, 07:54 AM   #3 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Zaqarbal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Spain
Posts: 823
Default

^ Thanks. I thought Albéniz deserved it. In the last quarter of the 19th century and the first of the 20th, after a very long time being in a disastrous musical situation since the early Baroque, finally there were again Spanish musicians of International renown (Albéniz, Granados, Tárrega, Falla, Sarasarte, Joaquín Rodrigo, etc.).

Albéniz is perhaps the best known amongst the Classical music lovers, but due to our chronic lack of Classical-music culture in a popular level (contrary to what happens in Central and Eastern Europe), he's not as known in his native country as he should be.
__________________
"Lullabies for adults / crossed by the years / carry the flower of disappointment / tattooed in their gloomy melodies."
Zaqarbal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.