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Old 12-23-2014, 06:14 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Violin pieces

I am looking for some violin pieces for grade 4 or 5 and I don't want something from some famous composer like Beethoven, Mozart or something, I am looking for something that your teacher would give you, something like that.
I am comfortable with 1-5 positions and 1st, 2nd and 3rd finger thrill.
Thank you
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Old 12-23-2014, 07:01 AM   #2 (permalink)
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This seems like a good approach.

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Old 12-25-2014, 06:02 AM   #3 (permalink)
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are you kidding me?
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Old 12-27-2014, 07:49 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I need something more difficult than Israeli concertino and easier than Czardas
Sorry for my bad English
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Old 12-27-2014, 12:04 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Plankton View Post
This seems like a good approach.
The Suzuki method IS an excellent approach and is suitable for students at all skill levels, since you can progress quickly through the books until you get to the level where you are challenged.

I also like the Suzuki method because it encourages a very relaxed, natural position for holding and playing the violin with nice rounded fingers, no stiff arms, and no "chicken wing" elbows.

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Originally Posted by Violinist0812 View Post
I need something more difficult than Israeli concertino and easier than Czardas
I listened to both the Israeli Concertino and Czardas to get a feel for the challenge you are needing.

If you have not yet played them, I recommend the Seitz concertos for violin. Although they do not go in position as does the Israeli Concertino, they include a few tricky passages plus, I feel, are lovely pieces. I enjoyed them immensely when I was in 4th or 5th grade in elementary school because they felt like "real" music:

Concerto No. 2, 3rd Movement (F. Seitz)


Concerto No. 5, 1st Movement (F. Seitz)


Concerto No. 5, 3rd Movement (F. Seitz)


I also love pieces by Vivaldi, whom you have probably already played since you don't want music by anyone famous, but it is possible you haven't played ALL his pieces for violin. If not, I recommend these because they can be challenging yet not *that* challenging:

Vivaldi Concerto in A Minor 1st movement


Vivaldi Concerto in A Minor 3rd movement
(Fun!)


Vivaldi Concerto in G Minor


Other possibilities:

Weber - Country Dance


Nigel Hess - Ladies in Lavender


Edward Elgar - Salut D'amour, Op. 12
(goes higher than 5th position but only occasionally)


Franz Schubert - Standchen Serenade violin
Short and sweet, it goes into position a few times


Sergei Prokofiev - Dance of the Knights
It goes higher than 5th position a few times, but it might be a good stretch.


* * *

Here are the recordings I found and like of the two pieces that form your lower and upper limits of difficulty:

George Pearlman - Israeli Concertino for violin and piano


Monti Czardas played by Clara Cernat
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Last edited by VEGANGELICA; 12-27-2014 at 12:36 PM.
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Old 12-27-2014, 12:08 PM   #6 (permalink)
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are you kidding me?
What country are you from? Also, what's the word for "ungrateful" in your language?
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Old 12-28-2014, 04:35 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGANGELICA View Post
The Suzuki method IS an excellent approach and is suitable for students at all skill levels, since you can progress quickly through the books until you get to the level where you are challenged.

I also like the Suzuki method because it encourages a very relaxed, natural position for holding and playing the violin with nice rounded fingers, no stiff arms, and no "chicken wing" elbows.



I listened to both the Israeli Concertino and Czardas to get a feel for the challenge you are needing.

If you have not yet played them, I recommend the Seitz concertos for violin. Although they do not go in position as does the Israeli Concertino, they include a few tricky passages plus, I feel, are lovely pieces. I enjoyed them immensely when I was in 4th or 5th grade in elementary school because they felt like "real" music:

Concerto No. 2, 3rd Movement (F. Seitz)


Concerto No. 5, 1st Movement (F. Seitz)


Concerto No. 5, 3rd Movement (F. Seitz)


I also love pieces by Vivaldi, whom you have probably already played since you don't want music by anyone famous, but it is possible you haven't played ALL his pieces for violin. If not, I recommend these because they can be challenging yet not *that* challenging:

Vivaldi Concerto in A Minor 1st movement


Vivaldi Concerto in A Minor 3rd movement
(Fun!)


Vivaldi Concerto in G Minor


Other possibilities:

Weber - Country Dance


Nigel Hess - Ladies in Lavender


Edward Elgar - Salut D'amour, Op. 12
(goes higher than 5th position but only occasionally)


Franz Schubert - Standchen Serenade violin
Short and sweet, it goes into position a few times


Sergei Prokofiev - Dance of the Knights
It goes higher than 5th position a few times, but it might be a good stretch.


* * *

Here are the recordings I found and like of the two pieces that form your lower and upper limits of difficulty:

George Pearlman - Israeli Concertino for violin and piano


Monti Czardas played by Clara Cernat
thank you very very much, I just adore these Seitz concertos you sent
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:23 AM   #8 (permalink)
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thank you very very much, I just adore these Seitz concertos you sent
You're very welcome! I adore them also and so I'm pleased to have "passed them on" to another violinist.

The Seitz concertos are truly charming, I feel. Each one traverses several moods, always including a plaintive, brooding section that especially spoke to me when I played them as a child.

Thanks to your question and my search for possible candidate pieces that might suit you, I was also glad to hear for the first time a piece new to me that I admire greatly because I feel it is very silkily emotional without quite tipping over entirely into schmaltzy: the theme song from Ladies in Lavender.

I included that piece in my last post, but here is a different youtube video of a violinist whose performance I like even better:

Nigel Hess - Ladies in Lavender - performed by violinist Craig Halliday
He plays it very well.

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Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
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