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Old 05-27-2011, 11:05 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Pakistani pop music - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pakistani pop music is attributed to have given birth to the genre in the South Asian region with Ahmed Rushdi's song ‘Ko-Ko-Korina’ in 1966.

Veterans like Runa Laila started the pop industry in Pakistan while the 15 year old pop sensation, Nazia, with her brother, Zohaib Hassan, ushered the birth of pop music all over South Asia tailing on the success of her British endeavours.

From Rushdi's pop hits to songs sung by the Hassan siblings, to bands including Junoon, Vital Signs and Strings, the Pakistani pop industry has steadily spread throughout South Asia and today is the most popular genre in Pakistan and the neighbouring South Asian countries. Songs sung by Pakistani pop artists are a regular feature on soundtracks of most of the Bollywood movies.

The genre has always been accepted in the mainstream youth culture but hindrances came in the form of changing governments, radical Islamicisation, foreign influences and a stiff competition from neighbouring countries. Still, pop music thrived and survived with a steady growth.


Nazia Hassan - First Pop Diva Among The Mullahs Who Was A Rage in Asia



Nazia Hassan was the first pop sensation of South Asia. At the tender age of 15, she became a pop sensation in her country and throughout the world, when her country, Pakistan, was ruled by the Mullahs. She was not only known in Pakistan and India, but also Brazil, Peru, Mexico, Russia, South Africa and Indonesia.

Nazia and her brother, Zohaib, sold 60 million copies worldwide. She was also a lawyer and worked in the UN Security Council. She relentlessly worked for children from UN Platform.

Nazia sadly died of lung cancer at the age of 35 in 2000.

Here is an article on her life.



Excerpt: The mullahs had a serious problem with a brother and sister dancing together on screen. Nazia’s first video that aired on TV in the early 80s was shot waist up so the audience couldn’t see her dancing feet.

Historically, India and Pakistan had a very unstable and dangerous relationship since their independence from the British rule. Both countries have had a really tough time in getting along with each other. Thus it was refreshing to see the youth in both countries singing the same tunes.


Reminiscing Nazia
By Umar Cheema

This 13th August 2011 it will be eleven years since Pakistan’s sweetheart , Nazia Hassan, passed away.

Millions of Pakistanis across the world wept as they heard or read this news. Nazia Hassan at the tender age of thirteen won the hearts of millions of Asians around the world through her unique style of music. She will always be regarded as the undisputed pioneer of sub-continental pop music, selling a staggering 60 million records internationally in a career spanning two decades.

What really made Nazia unique in the eyes of her fans, was not her success but the fact that she used her iconic status to promote social causes. She relentlessly worked for special children and for youth and women in distress residing in the underprivileged areas of Karachi. She initiated an NGO, called BAN (Battle Against Narcotics) and became an active member of organisations such as Voice of Women, National Youth Council of Pakistan, etc. In 1991 she joined the Department of Political and Security Council Affairs at the United Nations Headquarters in New York and worked there for 2years. In her third year she offered her services to UNICEF.

Her social and academic excellence won her a scholarship in Columbia University’s Leadership Program but she was unable to avail it because around this time she was diagnosed with cancer. After a successful operation Nazia returned to Pakistan, as the doctors advised her to rest and be in a stress free environment. Upon her return however, she was greeted with an arranged marriage which in her own words ‘became another cancer’ for her.

The marital stress led to a relapse of her cancer, forcing Nazia to return to the United Kingdom (where she had grown up) for treatment, accompanied by her parents and son. During the course of her painful treatment, Nazia decided to file for divorce, ‘I can only fight one cancer at a time,’ she said.

Ironically her divorce was completed ten days before her death, despite the fact that her ex-husband tried to contest her ‘right of khulla (divorce),’ given to her at the time of her marriage. Sadly, even after her death Nazia’s soul was made to suffer since her ex-husband tried to get possession of her body from her parents, and thereby further torturing the already suffering family.

In her last Will and Testament, Nazia had clearly stipulated to her lawyers that her son Arez should remain with her parents, but this too, was contested by her ex-husband in a court of law, before she was even buried. A few months later, The High Court of London gave custody of the child to Nazia’s parents; he now resides happily with them in London.



It is ironical that a person who was so caring and gave so much happiness to millions around the world could never find peace and happiness for herself. Does the case of Nazia say something about the world today or is it that the good always die young ? Whatever the answer maybe Nazia’s fans still remember her as ‘our own Princess Diana, our own Queen of Hearts’. Nazia we hope you are at peace now and can hear this in Heaven!

I vaguely remember our family gathering in the summer of 1985. Many of our relatives from the province of Punjab came to visit us in Karachi. It was a family tradition. Every other year either we would go to visit them or they would come to Karachi to spend a few weeks with us. It was one of those summers and I was hanging out with a couple of my older cousins in our balcony which faced the beach. Having survived three previous hot summers in Karachi I knew the value of the cool breeze that would rise from the sea and hit our balcony. We were chatting and listening to Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ on my very first stereo.

It was then when one of my cousins mentioned a song called ‘App jaisa koi meri zindagi mei aay’ (‘If someone like you comes into my life’) by a female artist named Nazia Hassan. I had no idea whom he was talking about. Nevertheless they popped in her cassette and hit the play button. I listened to the song and within a few seconds into it, I felt the melodious beat overcoming the hot summer day and the cool breeze that came from the sea. That was my first introduction to the queen of pop!

‘App jaisa koi’ was a hit single featured in the 1980 Bollywood movie, Qurbani. The song took South Asia by storm and Nazia, who was only 15 years old, became a star overnight. This was soon followed by her debut album Disco Dewane which also featured her brother Zoheb Hassan. The album was an instant hit. Pakistani and Indian youth welcomed this new and fresh style of music and singing with open arms. The incredible success of the album signaled one fact clearly: The sibling duo was here to stay and South Asia would be singing their tunes for a long time.



Nazia Hassan was born in 1965 in Karachi to an affluent Pakistani family. While she was still a child, the family moved to London. She was gifted with this incredible nasally voice that was plain yet intriguing. Music was simply a hobby for her and she had never considered singing as a career choice. She didn’t arrive at the crossroads of her musical journey until she met Biddu, a British-Indian composer. He was really impressed by the nasally quality of her voice. After discussing his thoughts with Feroz Khan the director and star of Qurbani, Nazia was asked to sing what would become her history-making song, ‘Aap jaisa koi.’ And that was it, her crossroads, and she chose the path that began her musical adventure.

Released in 1980, the title track from Disco Diwane was a number one hit not only in South Asia but also in a few countries in South America and the Middle East. Both the audio and video albums made record sales in India. However, Pakistani media took some time to accept this non-traditional style of singing and dancing. Pakistan Television (PTV) was reluctant to put these edgy and bold videos on air as the Pakistani television audience at the time was not used to disco/pop genre. It wasn’t long before they were able to see the Pakistani youth going crazy over the audio album and the success of the music videos in India. The videos were aired in 1981 and they were a blast. The “disco deewane mania” took over the country and Nazia and Zoheb Hassan became household names. Jinnah’s land was finally introduced to pop music.

The duo released another album ‘Boom Boom’ the same year. The songs from this album were featured in another Bollywood movie, ‘Star’. The movie didn’t do very well but the songs made history yet again. It was time for young Pakistanis, who only had Alamgir, Sheki and Naheed Akhtar as their listening choices, to get accustomed to the music of Nazia and Zoheb. And they did. Nazia and Zoheb Hassan became superstars in both countries. They were on TV talk shows, on the cover of magazines, on radio and on everyone’s lips.

Historically India and Pakistan had a very unstable and dangerous relationship since their independence from the British rule. Both countries have had a really tough time in getting along with each other. Thus it was refreshing to see the youth in both countries singing the same tunes.

The Hassans released two more albums, ‘Young Tarang’ and ‘Hotline’ in 1985 and 1987, respectively. Both were hit albums. The siblings loved what they were doing and the audience simply wanted more. It wasn’t just one particular thing about their songs or their style of music. It was a combination of factors. The lyrics were provocative, energizing, exciting, intriguing and listeners were able to relate to them. Nazia’s nasally voice, MTV style videos and disco/pop music all played into what felt like a cultural revolution.

As far as Pakistanis’ music exposure was concerned, it was the best of times and the worst of times. General Zia-ul-Haq’s ’Islamization’ of the country during the 80s became an obstacle for music lovers, whether they were the audience or the performers. Almost all musical shows on TV that involved women were banned. The mullahs had a serious problem with a brother and sister dancing together on screen. Nazia’s first video that aired on TV in the early 80s was shot waist up so the audience couldn’t see her dancing feet.

In 1988, General Zia was killed in a plane crash. Following the shock, the country went quickly into a recovery mode. The new government had the responsibility of lifting the morale of millions of people. Many things changed and many things created opportunities for a change. The music industry lifted itself up as well and made an entry back into people’s houses. The Nazia and Zoheb phenomenon paved the road for new and young talents all over the country.

By the early 1990’s, Pakistan experienced a new wave of young and hip bands. Music Channel Charts became one of the most popular shows in Pakistan’s music history. People would actually schedule their evenings around the show time. It was a great musical era. My sister and I used to sit in front of the TV and watch the weekly song ranking and share our excitement or complaints depending on which songs climbed up the charts. This was around the time when our generation was introduced to bands like Vital Signs, Arid Zone, Collage, Fringe Benefits, Milestones, Strings, Sequencers, Yatagaan and Junoon. This was the result of the revolution that Nazia and Zoheb brought about in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.




From Wikipedia:
Nazia Hassan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nazia Hassan (Urdu: نازیہ حسن) (April 3, 1965 – August 13, 2000[1]) was an iconic Pakistani pop singer. Her song "Aap Jaisa Koi" from the Indian film Qurbani made her a legend and pop icon in Pakistan and all of South Asia in the 1980s, where she is admired and loved even today, several years after her death. Nazia Hassan, along with her brother Zohaib Hassan sold over 60 million records worldwide.

The Guardian - Nazia Hassan Obituary
Obituary: Nazia Hassan | News | The Guardian

Here is a 3 Minute Trailer of an English and Urdu Documentary on her life. Watch from 1:50 - It is mostly in English from that point and is extremely touching!

Nazia left behind a 3 year old son when she died. He is 14 years old today.
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:13 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Okay, I've merged your Nazia Hassan post here...let me just see if I can change the order of the posts...EDIT: Never mind that, I merged your two posts so that the intro about Pakistani music comes on top
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:16 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Yes, I've heard Strings before.

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Old 05-27-2011, 01:20 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Some Songs of Nazia - The Pioneer of Disco/Pop Culture in South Asia















Below is the song which catapulted her to fame:

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Old 05-27-2011, 02:02 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrynight View Post
Yes, I've heard Strings before.

A single of Strings was also featured in Spiderman 2 soundtrack.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider-Man_2_(soundtrack)
On the Pakistani version of the soundtrack, a song by Strings titled "Najane Kyun" which translates to "I Don't Know Why" was used.

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Old 05-27-2011, 02:39 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Dum Dum and Disco Diwaane appeal to me the most. If she had some hits in South America it's possible I may have heard something before by her (I looked through some chart listings once) but I don't remember. Look at my Thai music thread, pop music influenced by older western melodic style I think, catchy melodies.
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Old 05-27-2011, 02:44 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Default More from Strings





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Old 05-27-2011, 02:56 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Default Vital Signs

Vital Signs - Another very successful band. Its lead singer, Junaid Jamshed, is very well known in Asia.











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Old 05-27-2011, 03:05 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Default Junoon

Junoon - The First Rock Band of Asia











A soft number:
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Old 05-27-2011, 03:15 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrynight View Post
Dum Dum and Disco Diwaane appeal to me the most. If she had some hits in South America it's possible I may have heard something before by her (I looked through some chart listings once) but I don't remember. Look at my Thai music thread, pop music influenced by older western melodic style I think, catchy melodies.
I'll look it up. Here are two more of her songs:



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