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Thom Yorke 11-08-2011 10:33 PM

The Philosophical Debate Thread
 
I was surprised to see that there was no thread for this in the philosophy section. Anything philosophy can go here.

Thom Yorke 11-08-2011 10:34 PM

"Hume's argument is that we cannot rationally justify the claim that nature will continue to be uniform, as justification comes in only two varieties, and both of these are inadequate. The two sorts are demonstrative reasoning, and probable reasoning. With regards to demonstrative reasoning, Hume argues that the uniformity principle cannot be demonstrated, as it is "consistent and conceivable" that nature might stop being regular. Turning to probable reasoning, Hume argues that we cannot hold that nature will continue to be uniform because it has been in the past, as this is using the very sort of reasoning (induction) that is under question: it would be circular reasoning. Thus no form of justification will rationally warrant our inductive inferences."

I love this. Probably my favourite philosophical theory. It is illogical to assume that history will repeat itself based on history repeating itself before. If I say that the earth will suddenly fall out of orbit tomorrow, is it any less logical than saying it will stay in orbit?

RVCA 11-09-2011 12:27 AM

Categorical Imperative all up in this biznatch

Howard the Duck 11-09-2011 01:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thom Yorke (Post 1117465)
"Hume's argument is that we cannot rationally justify the claim that nature will continue to be uniform, as justification comes in only two varieties, and both of these are inadequate. The two sorts are demonstrative reasoning, and probable reasoning. With regards to demonstrative reasoning, Hume argues that the uniformity principle cannot be demonstrated, as it is "consistent and conceivable" that nature might stop being regular. Turning to probable reasoning, Hume argues that we cannot hold that nature will continue to be uniform because it has been in the past, as this is using the very sort of reasoning (induction) that is under question: it would be circular reasoning. Thus no form of justification will rationally warrant our inductive inferences."

I love this. Probably my favourite philosophical theory. It is illogical to assume that history will repeat itself based on history repeating itself before. If I say that the earth will suddenly fall out of orbit tomorrow, is it any less logical than saying it will stay in orbit?

i think Chaos Theory has more or less proved that point

ThePhanastasio 11-09-2011 01:41 AM

Chaos Theory has proved?

Kind of an oxymoron, dontcha think?

Howard the Duck 11-09-2011 02:18 AM

ah i dunno

i suck at this

ThePhanastasio 11-09-2011 02:55 AM

I'm just messing with ya, mang. Chaos theory actually does make a lot more sense than a lot of theories people have slung about frequently.

Mykonos 11-09-2011 11:14 AM

I'm a very philosophically confused person, and I doubt that will change any time soon, so I won't have much to say here. That said, I tend to mix a very literal worldview (dialectics being my main thing) with a spiritual side (I am in possession of a soul despite not being in the current employ of the armed services etc.).

Howard the Duck 11-09-2011 06:55 PM

my philosophical state of mind is that I'm always questioning reality

Celladorina 11-11-2011 02:00 AM

To be or not to be? That is the question.


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