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Old 12-30-2013, 01:22 PM   #171 (permalink)
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I am picking this up again. I was sixteen when I started it and nineteen when I quit. I kind of considered re-starting it...but it's already taken me six years and will probably just take more. I have way different opinions on these albums even looking back at them now but oh well. HERE'S TO FINISHING IT!

Oh Mercy (1988)

This album when it was released was hailed as a comeback of sorts, hahahaha. Dylan had just released the Traveling Wilbury's Vol. 1. Hiring Joshua Tree producer, Daniel Lanois, who would later produce Time Out of Mind, they made this...thing.
"Poltical World" is a dumb ****ing song. It was the first one on this album I was familiar with. Musically it's not that bad, Dylan sounds alright, the percussion is excellent, it's just the lyrics are so stupid and when it comes to Dylan part of the appeal is in the well written song. Something about describing the world as "political" is just so self-evident that I cringe. "Ring them Bells" is overly sentimental crap.
The second side things start to pick up a bit. "Most of the Time" has been praised for it's atmosphere and production in critical reviews at the time and it's easy to see why. It does sound nice, but again, it sounds like grown up eighties cheese to me. "Disease of Conceit" was picked by Lou Reed at one of his favorite songs of 1989 leading me to believe 1989 was a miserable year for Lou Reed.
"Shooting Star" is marred by terrible production but it's a good song. Or maybe I was happy it was over.
"Favorite" Lyric: "Roses are red, violets are blue / And time is beginning to crawl / I just might have to come see you / Where teardrops fall"
"Favorite" Song: ?!?! j/k listen to Shooting Star, but the MTV unplugged version. It's like sort of a song on this album.
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Old 07-31-2015, 07:57 PM   #172 (permalink)
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Political World was easily the coolest song on that album
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Old 07-31-2015, 09:26 PM   #173 (permalink)
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To me, Dylan is like the *gourmet* macaroni and cheese of music... comforting, simply delightful to the senses, and a musical staple that appeals to so many pallets, not to mention it works well with just about any mood. Even my kids love him...

This song is one of his more popular ones but with good reason... It's almost impossible to harbor any negative emotions while it's playing; the lyrics are pure perfection IMHO, with the tune itself soothing and befitting without detracting from the poetic genius:

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Old 11-11-2015, 01:14 PM   #174 (permalink)
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How do you accurately described ... is no other words
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Old 02-25-2016, 05:47 PM   #175 (permalink)
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There's been a lot of talk about "Modern Day Bob Dylan"s and he seems to be the one who a lot of people compare most singer/songwriters to.

I would like to know who people on here think fits that title. Obviously no one will be as great, but who do you think comes close?
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Old 02-25-2016, 09:52 PM   #176 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvangelionLovr View Post
There's been a lot of talk about "Modern Day Bob Dylan"s and he seems to be the one who a lot of people compare most singer/songwriters to.

I would like to know who people on here think fits that title. Obviously no one will be as great, but who do you think comes close?
I'm biased because I grew up with his music but Simon Joyner has Dylan-esque traits among others in his songwriting repertoire. Here are some quotes about Simon from people much more credible than myself:

Quote:
"Omaha has given us the reigning heir to Henry Miller's dark emotional mirror, Townes Van Zandt's three-chord moan, and Lou Reed's warehouse minimalism: his name is Simon Joyner." — Gillian Welch

"Pound for pound Simon Joyner is my favorite lyricist of all time. He has shades of all the greats (Van Zandt, Cohen, Dylan) but exists in a space all his own ... He truly is an American songwriting treasure. It is my hope that more people will discover his music and share in the unique joy that it brings." — Conor Oberst

"Little bits of several folks that I like in what Simon does, but he ends up being his own man, no question." — John Peel

"It's not critical hype to say that Joyner possesses the same emotional depth as Leonard Cohen, or the same ability to tell a story. Here are the inhabitants of the boarding house in Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, still staggering or sitting wondering what's become of their lives. Joyner's characters tell their stories as if from shock, in the aftermath of their disbelief at the beginning of quiet, devastating acceptance." — Thom Jurek @ All Music Guide

"For over twenty years, Simon Joyner has carved out a particular space for his own strain of music and storytelling ... He’s equally adept at channeling characters who live with the long-term consequences of quotidian decisions and getting inside the head of those in darker territory." — Tobias Carroll @ BOMB

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Old 02-26-2016, 01:11 PM   #177 (permalink)
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I'm biased because I grew up with his music but Simon Joyner has Dylan-esque traits among others in his songwriting repertoire. Here are some quotes about Simon from people much more credible than myself:
Never heard of him! And Oberst is one of the ones I've heard compared to Dylan (I really like Oberst but I don't think he's THAT good). I'll have to check Simon out. What era?

The songwriters I feel are close to Dylan are Adam Duritz, Gregory Alan Isakov and maybe Tallest Man on Earth but he's more an exact Dylan ripoff than the "next Dylan"
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Old 02-26-2016, 06:44 PM   #178 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by EvangelionLovr View Post
Never heard of him! And Oberst is one of the ones I've heard compared to Dylan (I really like Oberst but I don't think he's THAT good). I'll have to check Simon out. What era?

The songwriters I feel are close to Dylan are Adam Duritz, Gregory Alan Isakov and maybe Tallest Man on Earth but he's more an exact Dylan ripoff than the "next Dylan"
Simon's been making music for 25+ years now. A Generation X'er like myself. We're in our 40's now. He's considered the Godfather of the Omaha music scene which Oberst helped elevate in its current incarnation. Oberst has said in the past "without Simon Joyner, there would be no Conor Oberst." A cliché, I know, but they're dear friends as well.

I don't really delve into "the next Dylan" debate these days. I have more pressing needs going on in my life. But there was a time when that was a fun debate to have, but I've since come to the conclusion that there is only one Dylan. But there is also only one Leonard Cohen, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine, Gram Parsons, Warren Zevon, Randy Newman, Brian Wilson, Stephin Merritt and the list goes on and on...

At the end of the day, I enjoy music from all of those mentioned above. Sure there are some similarities between a few of those guys, but there is also some unique differences that sets them apart from one another.
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Old 02-26-2016, 10:04 PM   #179 (permalink)
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Simon's been making music for 25+ years now. A Generation X'er like myself. We're in our 40's now. He's considered the Godfather of the Omaha music scene which Oberst helped elevate in its current incarnation. Oberst has said in the past "without Simon Joyner, there would be no Conor Oberst." A cliché, I know, but they're dear friends as well.

I don't really delve into "the next Dylan" debate these days. I have more pressing needs going on in my life. But there was a time when that was a fun debate to have, but I've since come to the conclusion that there is only one Dylan. But there is also only one Leonard Cohen, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine, Gram Parsons, Warren Zevon, Randy Newman, Brian Wilson, Stephin Merritt and the list goes on and on...

At the end of the day, I enjoy music from all of those mentioned above. Sure there are some similarities between a few of those guys, but there is also some unique differences that sets them apart from one another.
I'll have to check him out, I'm 25, so I guess millennial? Not too sure. Musically and soulfully I'm more a Gen-Xer. Oberst is great, but I haven't heard too much about the Omaha music scene. I don't follow music in the history sense, I just jump from station to station on pandora and when I find a new artist I listen to them for weeks on end and the cycle repeats haha.
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Old 02-27-2016, 11:57 AM   #180 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by EvangelionLovr View Post
I'll have to check him out, I'm 25, so I guess millennial? Not too sure. Musically and soulfully I'm more a Gen-Xer. Oberst is great, but I haven't heard too much about the Omaha music scene. I don't follow music in the history sense, I just jump from station to station on pandora and when I find a new artist I listen to them for weeks on end and the cycle repeats haha.
Nothing wrong with that. Enjoy the journey. Lots of great music out there to discover.
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