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Old 10-19-2008, 06:31 PM   #51 (permalink)
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I have never really listen to the Grime type music but the videos he has posted are good ill def be doing alot of research.
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Old 01-19-2009, 08:58 AM   #52 (permalink)
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There's not a lot of point updating this thread anymore on a broadly rock-oriented forum, however I'll end it on an extremely high note: DJ Slimzee & Dizzee Rascal - Sidewinder set (2002) (CD-R rip so quality is top notch)

If you only ever hear one piece of music (this is an hour-long skankers) that is a definitive document of an exciting and vibrant UK subculture, make it this. Or possibly the Boy In Da Corner LP if you don't have the stamina for two-step in the mix.

This was recorded for Sidewinder, the promoter that used to put on huge grime raves and the only places you'd be able to pick up a tape pack with exclusive sets after the show. As such this is old skool, properly upbeat and danceable under the crystal hangover from the UK garage days.

This was also the start of grime's golden age (2002-2004), all the dubs were minimal techno classics (no hype), Slimzee was the best DJ around at the time and is on top form here accompanied by Raskit before the Mercury Prize exposure and subsequent deflation.

The music press at the time of Dizzee's 2003 album compared grime's minimalist sound - the glitches and bleeps hovering over skittering snares and wobbling bass spasms - to the ringtones of those old Nokia phones: monochrome screen, impossible to lose down the back of the sofa...

Not an unfair comparison, but it was almost certainly the brief media spotlight and attempts to over-complicate what was essentially a cathartic, grassroots urban movement that almost certainly 'killed' classic grime.
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Old 01-19-2009, 09:48 AM   #53 (permalink)
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If you only ever hear one piece of music (this is an hour-long skankers) that is a definitive document of an exciting and vibrant UK subculture, make it this. Or possibly the Boy In Da Corner LP if you don't have the stamina for two-step in the mix.
Boy In Da Corner is a classic. One thing I've always loved about grime in general and that album in particular is how broken the music sounds. Great stuff.
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Old 01-19-2009, 01:41 PM   #54 (permalink)
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Nice one sir. I (and my eldest) have been looking for some new Grime and this will do nicely!
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Old 01-20-2009, 07:17 PM   #55 (permalink)
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JH so did you and yours get on with the Dizz set alright? See the thing is despite this thread being a lost cause (but I repped still ), I've still got some must-hear pirate stuff (I call them artifacts) to get off my chest if the demand is there. Just add them to the 'final post' like. I feel like I'm carrying the torch for this niche genre that nobody further out than Edmonton gives two sh*t about...
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:10 PM   #56 (permalink)
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Grime, gotta love it. I call it British Hip Hop. Did anybody ever check out that dude Akala?
Grime and British Hip Hop are two seperate concepts.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:16 PM   #57 (permalink)
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I'm with you on JME, when the first Boy Better Know mixtape dropped he was a breath of fresh air though, I rate him as a producer most of the time still. 'Ju Ju Man' I'm partial to aswell, if you've heard that?

Think he produced Tempa T's 'next Hype' aswell but I could be wrong?
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:24 PM   #58 (permalink)
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I'm with you on JME, when the first Boy Better Know mixtape dropped he was a breath of fresh air though, I rate him as a producer most of the time still. 'Ju Ju Man' I'm partial to aswell, if you've heard that?

Think he produced Tempa T's 'next Hype' aswell but I could be wrong?
I haven't heard that tune and i haven't got a clue about the Tempa T thing, my main problem with him is that he can't rap to save his life and he relies heavily on recycling the same bars again and again or when that fails shouts SERIOUS! at every oppurtunity. It also doesn't help that annoying indie kids routinely suck his ****. Have you heard The Art Of Rolling by Devlin that was out last year? A bit inconsistent but good nonetheless and theres no denying that the boy can rap.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:48 PM   #59 (permalink)
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Yeah I agree with you about Devlin to a certain extent, the guy can bar and he has a lyrical depth you don't often see in grime, but his delivery is way too monotonous for me, he needs to slow down once in a while! I don't have the Art of Rolling but I used to have the first mixtape 'Tales From the Crypt', it was deep.

Ju Ju Riddim
Tempz - Next Hype

JuJu's pretty annoying but he's on another level production-wise. I think he's had crossover success with the scene kids because of his clear delivery, he's accessible. The 'serious' thing yeah... lot's of MC's had catchphrases down the years lol.. heard of Flirta D?
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Old 03-14-2009, 06:19 AM   #60 (permalink)
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Big bump.

Basically here is a mix, designed to be a chronological cross-section of the years 1999-2003 in the London scene.

It's a mash of instrumentals and vocals, the emphasis on the former, with most of the seminal dubs included as well as the track that 'invented' grime (Eskimo), as you can see plenty of heed is paid to the 'father of grime' Wiley.
The vocalled tracks mainly serve as short interludes and are mostly pirate radio rips or just little bits of speech I thought were good to break it up. Pirate radio became the main outlet early on, illustrating the grittier sound that was adopted as the consciousness became much more dark, angry, minimal... even paranoid.


2003 short. We have a good laugh about Discarda now...*smh*

As garage becomes grime/2-step/eski/sublow (a name for it had not been decided) and gets pushed underground, hopefully you'll notice the music gets weirder, the four-to-the-floor of the first few tracks dissipates and things get messy.
Consistent throughout are the two-step drum patterns, the mid/sub-bass and London's Afro-Caribbean estate culture. This is the soil in which the seeds of dubstep would germinate come 2004. But more on that later

This mix runs up to 2003 and is essentially the prelude to a full-on compilation of early/mid-era dubstep to be posted in it's home thread.
Recommended for fans of dubstep/glitch/minimal techno/hip-hop?
Click the headline below to download


**********



Scruface Riddims - the Roots of Dubstep

1. Boo! (12" Mix) - Sticky Feat. Ms. Dynamite
2. 138 Trek - DJ Zinc
3. Flow So Cold That I Live In An Igloo (Radio) - Wiley
4. Warriors - Alias
5. Different Congo Vibes (Interlude) - D Double E
6. Tingz In Boots - Ruff Sqwad
7. Eskimo - Wiley
8. Wot Do U Call It? - Wiley
9. Jon E Cash - War
10. Strings Hoe - Dizzee Rascal
11. Man A Badman (Radio) - Esco
12. Cha (VIP Mix) - Plasticman
13. I Keep It Gully (Freestyle) - Black The Ripper
14. Baraka (Blue Portal Mortal Kombat Riddim) - JME
15. Strike The Match F1 Dub - 2 Twisted
16. Listening Crew (Interlude) - D Double E
17. Morgue - Wiley
18. Oi London, We're Rolling (Radio) - Wiley
19. Stomp - Big Shot
20. Remove the Ice From Your Wrist (2003 Radio) - D Double, God's Gift, Kano, Tinchy Stryder, Munk
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