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Old 07-09-2006, 11:31 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default The Musicbanter Hall of Fame

Note: This is a list of bands voted into the hall of fame here. This thread is merely for viewing purposes but left open so only selected members can post bands/artists added.




DAVID BOWIE



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The cliché about David Bowie says he's a musical chameleon, adapting himself according to fashion and trends. While such a criticism is too glib, there's no denying that Bowie demonstrated remarkable skill for perceiving musical trends at his peak in the '70s. After spending several years in the late '60s as a mod and as an all-around music-hall entertainer, Bowie reinvented himself as a hippie singer/songwriter. Prior to his breakthrough in 1972, he recorded a proto-metal record and a pop/rock album, eventually redefining glam rock with his ambiguously sexy Ziggy Stardust persona. Ziggy made Bowie an international star, yet he wasn't content to continue to churn out glitter rock. By the mid-'70s, he developed an effete, sophisticated version of Philly soul that he dubbed "plastic soul," which eventually morphed into the eerie avant-pop of 1976's Station to Station Shortly afterward, he relocated to Berlin, where he recorded three experimental electronic albums with Brian Eno. At the dawn of the '80s, Bowie was still at the height of his powers, yet following his blockbuster dance-pop album Lets Dance in 1983, he slowly sank into mediocrity before salvaging his career in the early '90s. Even when he was out of fashion in the '80s and '90s, it was clear that Bowie was one of the most influential musicians in rock, for better and for worse. Each one of his phases in the '70s sparked a number of subgenres, including punk, new wave, goth rock, the new romantics, and electronica. Few rockers ever had such lasting impact.
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Old 07-09-2006, 11:57 AM   #2 (permalink)
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RADIOHEAD








Radiohead was one of the few alternative bands of the early '90s to draw heavily from the grandiose arena rock that characterized U2's early albums. But the band internalized that epic sweep, turning it inside out to tell tortured, twisted tales of angst and alienation. Vocalist Thom Yorks's pained lyrics were brought to life by the group's three-guitar attack, which relied on texture — borrowing as much from My Bloody Valentine and Pink Floyd as R.E.M. and Pixies— instead of virtuosity. It took Radiohead awhile to formulate their signature sound. Their 1993 debut, Pablo Honey, only suggested their potential, and one of its songs, "Creep," became an unexpected international hit, its angst-ridden lyrics making it an alternative rock anthem. Many observers pigeonholed Radiohead as a one-hit wonder, but the group's second album, The Bends, was released to terrific reviews in the band's native Britain in early 1995, helping build a more stable fan base. Having demonstrated unexpected staying power, as well as increasing ambition, Radiohead next released OK Computer a progressive, electronic-tinged masterpiece that became one of the most acclaimed albums of the '90s.
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Old 07-13-2006, 12:21 AM   #3 (permalink)
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IMMORTAL TECHNIQUE






Born in a military hospital in South America, Immortal Technique was brought to the United States in the early 80's while a civil war was breaking out in his native Peru. The US supported puppet democracy and Guerilla factions were locked in a bitter struggle which ended like most do in Latin America, with the military and economic aid of the State Dept. through channels like the CIA. Although he had escaped the belligerent poverty and social turmoil of life in the 3rd world, he was now residing in Harlem which had its own share of drama. Growing up on the streets of New York, the young man became enamored with Hip Hop culture, writing graffiti and starting to rhyme at an early age. Although he frequently cut school and ended up being arrested time and time again for his wild behavior, the kid still managed to finish high school and got accepted to a state university. Unfortunately the survivalist and aggressive attitude that was the norm in New York City caused him to be involved in more violent altercations at school, whether it was with other brothers, false flaggers or the relentlessly racist population of an uncultured Middle America.
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Old 07-13-2006, 12:30 AM   #4 (permalink)
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JOSHUA HOMME




Songwriter/guitarist Josh Homme has been part of two of the most acclaimed stoner rock/metal bands of the late '90s, early 2000s: Kyuss and Queens of the Stone Age. Formed in the late '80s, Kyuss hailed from Palm Desert, CA, and built a following by throwing "generator parties" (which consisted of inviting friends out to a secluded part of the desert at night while the band would plug into a power generator and jam away until dawn). The band's 1991 debut, Wretch, was ignored by the public (despite such similar-sounding acts as Soundgarden and Alice in Chains storming the charts), and while 1992's Blues for the red Sun received widespread critical acclaim, it, too, failed to break the band commercially. Kyuss signed with Elektra, issuing two more releases (1994's Welcome to Sky Valley and 1995's And the Circus Leaves Town) before calling it quits in 1995.
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Old 07-13-2006, 01:20 PM   #5 (permalink)
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THE MARS VOLTA



Picking up the pieces from At the Drive In, Cedric Bixler and Omar Rodriguez formed the Mars Volta and wasted little time in branching out into elements of hardcore, psychedelic rock, and free jazz that expanded on the boundaries of their previous work. Although their previous band's demise ultimately arrived before they were able to truly capitalize on their mounting commercial triumphs, the Mars Volta immediately impressed with their willingness to eschew conventional logic and push themselves into new artistic directions instead of opting for the more marketable sounds. (Interestingly, their progressive yet streamlined approach gave them the early lead among critics against their former bandmates in Sparta, the more emo-leaning of the bands resulting from the split.) Bixler and Rodriguez enlisted friends Ikey Owens(also of The Long Beach Dub All Stars) and Jeremy Michael Ward, and the Mars Volta debuted with the EP Tremulant in 2002. Still, as much of their reputation was built on the strength of their live show, their highly energetic performances resulted in a wave of word-of-mouth hype that elevated the band to near-mythic proportions because so little of their recorded material was available to the public. Sadly, Ward passed away May 25, 2003 from an apparent drug overdose at the age of 27. Mars Volta had recently returned from an European tour supporting the Red Hot Chili Peppers where they introduced brand new tracks from the full-length De-Loused in the Comatourium, which was released via Universal the following June. The band returned in early 2005 with their second full-length, the ambitious song-cycle Frances the Mute. They also issued the live set Scab Dates later that year.
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Old 07-14-2006, 12:32 AM   #6 (permalink)
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THE FALL OF TROY



The band was raised in Mukilteo, Washington, a small town about 30 miles north of Seattle. There isn't much to do there when you're too young for the bars and too old for the playground. So you do what every other bored kid whose dad just happened to be a session musician with Allman Brothers and Eagles in the 70's - you start a band. The Fall of Troy was originally called Thirty Years War, but that didn't last long (get it?), and they decided to stick with their current name. The lineup has changed here or there, but the core group of three has and forever will stay the same.

Before their 17th birthdays, the guys recorded their first full-length, a self-titled release on Lujo Records. The record was recorded in one-take over five days, and it shows. That is to say that the energy was captured but the production suffered. The band embarked on a couple self-guided tours down to California and played numerous shows in the NW in support of their record, but something didn't feel quite right. The band was progressing past much of the old material and was looking for something more in terms of label support.

Fast forward to January 2005, after a lengthy courtship, the boys signed onto Equal Vision Records. Before the ink was even dry The Fall of Troy head into the studio with producer Barrett Jones(Nirvana, The Foo Fighters, Melvins, Jawbox) to record its second full-length. The songs on this record are a bit of old and new that will finally be a true representation of The Fall of Troy. Look for the The Fall of Troy on tour in a town near you this spring, and their record in stores this summer.
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Old 07-18-2006, 06:53 PM   #7 (permalink)
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JAMES BROWN



Soul Brother Number One," "the Godfather of Soul," "the Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite" — those are mighty titles, but no one can question that James Brown has earned them more than any other performer. Other singers were more popular, others were equally skilled, but few other African-American musicians have been so influential on the course of popular music. And no other musician, pop or otherwise, put on a more exciting, exhilarating stage show; Brown's performances were marvels of athletic stamina and split-second timing.
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Old 07-18-2006, 06:59 PM   #8 (permalink)
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JOHNNY CASH



Johnny Cash was one of the most imposing and influential figures in post-World War II country music. With his deep, resonant baritone and spare, percussive guitar, he had a basic, distinctive sound. Cash didn't sound like Nashville, nor did he sound like honky tonk or rock & roll. He created his own subgenre, falling halfway between the blunt emotional honesty of folk, the rebelliousness of rock & roll, and the world weariness of country. Cash's career coincided with the birth of rock & roll, and his rebellious attitude and simple, direct musical attack shared a lot of similarities with rock. However, there was a deep sense of history — as he would later illustrate with his series of historical albums — that kept him forever tied with country. And he was one of country music's biggest stars of the '50s and '60s, scoring well over 100 hit singles.
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Old 07-21-2006, 06:29 AM   #9 (permalink)
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BOB MARLEY







Reggae's most transcendent and iconic figure, Bob Marley was the first Jamaican artist to achieve international superstardom, in the process introducing the music of his native island nation to the far-flung corners of the globe. Marley's music gave voice to the day-to-day struggles of the Jamaican experience, vividly capturing not only the plight of the country's impoverished and oppressed but also the devout spirituality that remains their source of strength. His songs of faith, devotion, and revolution created a legacy that continues to live on not only through the music of his extended family but also through generations of artists the world over touched by his genius.
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Old 07-21-2006, 06:41 AM   #10 (permalink)
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THE SMITHS





The Smiths were the definitive British indie rock band of the '80s, marking the end of synth-driven new wave and the beginning of the guitar rock that dominated English rock into the '90s. Sonically, the group were indebted to the British Invasion, crafting ringing, melodic three-minute pop singles, even for their album tracks. But their scope was far broader than that of a revivalist band. The group's core members, vocalist Morrisey and guitarist Johnny Marr, were obsessive rock fans inspired by the D.I.Y. ethics of punk, but they also had a fondness for girl groups, pop, and rockabilly. Morrisey and Marr also represented one of the strangest teams of collaborators in rock history. Marr was the rock traditionalist, looking like an elegant version of Keith Richards during the Smiths' heyday, and meticulously layering his guitar tracks in the studio. Morrisey, on the other hand, broke from rock tradition by singing in a keening, self-absorbed croon, embracing the forlorn, romantic poetry of Oscar Wilde, publicly declaring his celibacy, performing with a pocketful of gladiolas and a hearing aid, and making no secret of his disgust for most of his peers. While it eventually led to the Smiths' early demise, the friction between Morrisey and Marr resulted in a flurry of singles and albums over the course of three years that provided the blueprint for British guitar rock in the following decade.
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