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Old 09-13-2012, 10:09 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Children's Music When Children

What, if you can remember, was your opinion of children's music when you were a child? I'm looking for any connection between that and tastes in adulthood.
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Old 09-13-2012, 10:18 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I remember my Sesame Street records with such hits as:



And:

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Old 09-13-2012, 10:25 AM   #3 (permalink)
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I guess I liked it. I mean I definitely remember listening to the Free to Be You and Me soundtrack as a kid and I loved The Point by Nilsson (who I still love as an adult). Although, now that I think of it, those are the only two children's albums I remember listening to. I guess most of what I liked was stuff my parents and older brother liked, which would be regular rock, pop and country music.
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Old 09-13-2012, 12:15 PM   #4 (permalink)
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I absolutely loved this when I were a lad! Plus it was the first ever multicoloured disc I had ever seen: I watched entranced as it spun on the platter. Mind you, the B-side, "The ugly bug ball" was pretty rockin' too!
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Old 09-13-2012, 12:17 PM   #5 (permalink)
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... and here it is! Amazed I found this!
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Old 09-13-2012, 09:10 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I didn't like children's music when I was a kid. Silly stuff, embarrasing to hear people singing in person. I still feel that way. Although the Duck Tales theme song is okay (and isn't pure children's music).
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Old 09-13-2012, 09:18 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wisdom View Post
What, if you can remember, was your opinion of children's music when you were a child? I'm looking for any connection between that and tastes in adulthood.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wisdom View Post
I didn't like children's music when I was a kid. Silly stuff, embarrasing to hear people singing in person. I still feel that way. Although the Duck Tales theme song is okay (and isn't pure children's music).
I see a connection between narrow-mindedness in childhood and narrow-mindedness in adulthood.
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Old 09-13-2012, 09:24 PM   #8 (permalink)
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As a child I was more into classical music, if only for the reason I was taking lessons in several instruments and that lends itself to a lot of recommendations from teachers. I wouldn't say I seriously got into music until I was at least 10 or 11, at which point I didn't really ever **** with mainstream pop/kids jamz/whatever marketing label you prefer because my mother was a former radio engineer and my father worked for a few mid-level blues labels, thus affording me a rather wide look into "adult" music during my developmental years. In my mind, there's no such thing as "children's music", just music I like and music I don't. As a child I listened to 3rd Eye Blind, the Cure, Siouxie and the Banshees, and a fair bit of Smiths.
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Old 09-13-2012, 09:27 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Depends what age you mean. Probably as you get into your teens you're more conscious of what other people think of your taste. In single digits you can be a bit more open minded.
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Old 09-13-2012, 10:29 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopsych View Post
What, if you can remember, was your opinion of children's music when you were a child? I'm looking for any connection between that and tastes in adulthood.
Say, you might like this old thread of mine about children's music http://www.musicbanter.com/country-f...tml#post726951 because it includes songs that people enjoyed when they were kids.

Your question about the relationship between children's musical tastes and their adult tastes is interesting and probably very hard to answer. I suspect people's adult tastes are shaped most strongly in their teenage years rather than when they were little kids, especially since I think far fewer children's songs exist than adult songs, meaning that most children in a given culture (and time) are exposed to and like the same children's songs yet grow up to have divergent tastes in music.

How do you plan to look for a connection between people's opinion of children's music when they were kids, and their music tastes in adulthood? Do you want to mention in your OP that you'd like people to describe their adult musical tastes so you can look for some sort of correlation? Also, do you want to know more about *all* the music that people heard and liked when they were little children (under 10?), rather than just their opinion of the music that was composed for children?

* * *

My childhood music tastes:

I liked almost all children's songs that I heard when I was a child (meaning that I don't remember disliking any songs before I was 11 or 12 years old) but I had distinct favorites. I preferred children's songs with thought-provoking lyrics that had some melancholy aspect to them, meaning songs that sound sweet but sad at the same time.

However, I felt neutral about the jazz music that I heard on Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood TV show, which I watched all the time. Although I liked Mr. Rogers and his supportive, simple ideas and advice in his children's songs, I don't think I cared much for the jazz piano and accompaniment. As I grew older, my dislike of jazz grew because it sounded frilly and unfocused to me.

Songs I loved as a child:

"Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star"
"Puff the Magic Dragon"
"Inchworm Song" by Frank Loesser (I loved, loved, loved that song!!!)
"Mother Earth and Father Time" from Charlotte's Web
"The Rainbow Connection" sung by Kermit the Frog in The Muppet Movie
(I also enjoyed Vivaldi violin concertos and other classical songs which I learned about due to playing them in Suzuki violin lessons).

"Inchworm Song." I used to wander around singing this to myself frequently when I was little. I loved the song because it was so sweet and wistful at the same time and I liked its topic of appreciating nature...and inchworms:


Danny Kaye - Hans Christian Andersen - YouTube


"Mother Earth and Father Time" from Charlotte's Web, also sweet yet melancholy.


Charlotte's Web - Mother Earth and Father Time - YouTube


"The Rainbow Connection" sung by Kermit the Frog
I like most Kermit songs, but this one was my favorite. That frog was so nice and friendly and cute. I still like him.


Muppet Movie - The Rainbow Connection - YouTube

And here is an example of the Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood jazzy music that I didn't particularly like when I was a little child:

DID NOT LIKE: Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood Jazz Intro Music



* * *

My adult music tastes:

My childhood preference for songs that combine sweetness and sadness has remained into adulthood, but I branched out to embrace aggression in music as I got older and more defiant...and I developed distinct distaste for quite a lot of music, while as a child I either liked or was neutral toward music I heard.

I tend to like alternative rock music and classical the most (but only some songs, not all), and I especially like forceful songs that have some quirky element to them. I like some metal but not most, and some dubstep songs but not most. I tend to dislike pop songs except for the ones I love. I tend not to like super giddy, "happy" sounding songs. I hate electronica with a consistent, droning drum beat (I loathe most modern dance songs), but I like some non-dance electronica. I dislike most country music (it sounds affected and fake to me and usually the lyrics are too simplistic). I dislike almost all rap and hip hop songs (they sound show-offy and contrived to me). I don't like most classic rock. And I can't think of a jazz song I like. I avoid listening to jazz. I also dislike soul music. I don't like blues, either.

I think my childhood neutrality toward the jazzy music I heard on Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood grew into dislike over the years such that by the time I was 13 I didn't like jazz when I heard it. Jazz sounds unnecessarily frilly, ornate, and meandering to me...the musical equivalent of overly ornamented baroque furniture that I despise.

If you can find a connection between "The Rainbow Connection" and the following, one of my favorite adult songs, let me know!

Eskamon - "Fine Objects"


Eskamon - Fine Objects - YouTube
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Last edited by VEGANGELICA; 11-10-2012 at 09:09 AM.
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