Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > General Music
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-29-2014, 12:47 PM   #91 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,304
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoxyRollah View Post
Sorry girl nap time lasted like three days... OK Here we go...

I am not saying we don't live in of social unrest either. We do. But again, the mentality is completely different. In the 60's you had a group mentality. Because so many teenagers, and young adults at that particular time frame, were fed up with the old ways. The old ways no longer worked for them, and they bonded on that basic premiss.
Good points.

I agree with your point about the 60's but I think that same argument could be made about today's society. I think my generation does not bond or band together because there are consequences for doing that and being an individual that thinks outside the box. The industry and the system wants people to act the same and not challenge things that are presented. So the industry also plays a negative role in this difference to.

In the 60's you had songs that reinforced the idea that people should show backlash and we do not have songs like that now because that is something the industry obviously does not want to promote.

I think this same "group mentality" can apply in today's society as well.

When you say "group think" mentality are you referring to the the industry, record companies and artists or the general music buying public?

There is always a "group think" mentality regardless of the era or decade. The current popular music artists and popular music labels collectively do not have an interest in songs that discusses social or political issues.

The industry chooses to only promote certain artists and certain songs that is associated with what they are trying to promote.

For instance, I know this example has nothing to do with what we are talking about but I think it shows how the industry is in control of what is being promoted.

Example:

In today's current mainstream scene it is much harder for African American R&B artists to cross over making R&B music. The industry has currently designed that genre where only White artists that make R&B music can cross over. The industry promotes those white artist's R&B songs on popular stations and outlets which automatically allows them to reach a wider audience compared to the African American R&B artists that pretty much just play on R&B stations.

I think the industry as a whole believes socially conscious songs can not produce money which is why they do not invest in songs that cover these subjects.

I think if the popular music labels and popular music artists collectively tried to make their music more socially conscious, they might be surprised that more people actually would want to hear that. Music inspires and influences people more than what people give it credit for.

I think the current mainstream scene is designed to dumb down peoples way of thinking and to prevent people from becoming aware of issues with substance or depth. This type of manipulation and group think mentality is highly detrimental. It is so detrimental to the point that if you even now question why pop music is so pussified, you get bashed for it lol


In the 60's that premiss became a movement, a spiritual movement, a movement to change injustice, a movement that was out for the grater good of humanity. And anytime you have progression in history it's bloody.The music of that time couldn't help but reflect the energy in the air. There is still one thing that this time doesn't have that the 60's did.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RoxyRollah View Post
THE USE OF LSD, as form spiritual enlightenment, and people were experimenting with it and all the views the come along with a psychedelic trip. You don't have this now at all. You have a few parties, and festivals that you find it in abundance, or you don't. But it is not nearly the catalyst like it was back in the day. Thus influencing a grater amount of musicians and inspiring them to use their celebrity in a positive way.
Agree.
However, every single artist in the 60’s did not use LSD. Most of the artists that singed about socially conscious music in fact did not use LSD or drugs. Of course, some did but not all 1960’s artists did so I do not think you need to take LSD in order to make socially conscious songs.
Current music today can still reflect the times and social issues we experience in our current society. This does not have to stop in the 1960’s because this not just a 1960’s issue. Every decade of music can reflect the social and political problems that affected that era.
I think it is sad because in a way the current mainstream scene kinda reflects our times.

A nation that is no longer interested in values, morals and the principles that created this country. Maybe it is not the public and instead the industry or a mixture of both. It is disturbing how we still experience so much turmoil in our society and the popular music artists, industry and labels do not wish to make songs that reflect that. It just seems that they are more interested in superficial things as well as money but then again maybe that is the overall interest of the public (American society) as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoxyRollah View Post
( He will always say what I am thinking about this topic better then I do. )

...

Because of the lack of lsd readily available, and the lack of desire to expand our consciousness now a days you won't see the prominence of important messages in music like you did back then. I don't think this is the fault of the record companies babe
I think you are confusing the purpose of what LSD was used for during the 60’s versus what it is considered today. LSD is a hallucinogen. So it causes hallucinations, psychological and emotional disability. It also causes severe physical and mental disability as well. In the 1960’s, like you mentioned earlier, the purpose of the usage of the drug was mainly for spiritual reasons. Psychologists in the 1960’s also used it to experiment on their clients to test the effects of the drug in psychotherapy. However current research shows that there is no evidence that hallucinogens increase spirituality, creativity or have therapeutic value. Psychologists currently do not use it in psychotherapy because it can kill people and causes to many negative effects.

The drug causes people to experience an “out of body experience” or “visions of beings” but those are technically delusions and hallucinations as a result from taking the drug. People have killed themselves because they thought a spiritual being told them to or because they saw someone that told them to but these are all delusions as a result from taking the drug.
So LSD is not the reason why artists do not write social conscious music anymore. I think this is the fault of the record companies as well as the music industry. LSD does not enhance creativity or spirituality. There is no evidence that supports that it does in current research.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoxyRollah View Post
I think this is the fault of the times we live in. The messages that are out there, are not the same as they were back then, and the commonality is lost. Now you may find a handful of artists that are talking about issues that are important to them specifically. Which will in no way ever dominate history as the music of the 60's because most of the artists of that time, were on the same wave length.
I agree. We need to come back together as a nation and as people.

Last edited by Soulflower; 03-29-2014 at 12:59 PM.
Soulflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 12:53 PM   #92 (permalink)
Zum Henker Defätist!!
 
The Batlord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Beating GNR at DDR and keying Axl's new car
Posts: 42,125
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by realtalk92 View Post
I agree. We need to come back together as a nation and as people.
What? It was the "rebellion" and changing times of the sixties that brought us apart by telling us that we had the right to be different. It was back in the days of not questioning the government, white picket fences and two and a half children, and conformity that the nation was united. People losing that cultural cohesion is just a natural result of people thinking for themselves.
__________________
BRING ME THE HORIZON >>>> CHARLES MINGUS
i
The Batlord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 12:54 PM   #93 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,304
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Batlord View Post
Dude, those are twenty songs. I'm sure if we went back to 1967 and listened to the radio for a year we would both be flabbergasted by just how much complete and utter crap we had to suffer through to get to those songs. Hindsight is a bitch.
Im a girl

lol and this is a funny post.

I agree with this post to.

I never implied past decades had their share of bad popular music. However, compared to today's mainstream scene the quality of music was a lot better in past era's overall.

I just limited it to 20 songs but I could have said ALOT more songs from the 60's but I wanted to give equal input for each of the other era's and I simply just don't have the time to write 500 popular songs from the 60s decade lol
Soulflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 12:56 PM   #94 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,304
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Batlord View Post
What? It was the "rebellion" and changing times of the sixties that brought us apart by telling us that we had the right to be different. It was back in the days of not questioning the government, white picket fences and two and a half children, and conformity that the nation was united. People losing that cultural cohesion is just a natural result of people thinking for themselves.
When I made that comment I was speaking "generally" and really speaking for our current society, not in reference to the 60's.

In a way the current popular music scene reflects that we do not care about social issues anymore and as a people I think we do need to come together again. It seems like our morals and values have been lost.
Soulflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 01:02 PM   #95 (permalink)
silky smooth
 
YorkeDaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pangaea
Posts: 3,673
Default

I post 20 songs from this decade that were all great songs and dont even get a response for it

my work is not appreciated here
__________________
http://cloudcover1.bandcamp.com/
http://daydreamsociety.bandcamp.com/

Think about how life sucks -> Vent about it on MusicBanter -> Make no progress towards improving life because limited free time is wasted on MusicBanter -> Think about how life sucks
YorkeDaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 01:02 PM   #96 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Screen13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,367
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Francis View Post
Why not discuss the coked out disco era too, that was fun.

I think music just mirrors whtvr mindset is currently culturaly relevant, look back at 2002 and on this video by SOAD



If nothing is currently happening you can't expect artists to incite some revolution, also even today there are still musicians playing political songs or music with a deep message they're just not at the forefront of mainstream music so you might not know them.

So you can't say music with a social awareness message is dead, it's just not very relevant in our current time.
In a way, and I know that this is going to sound very stereotypical, but Disco did encourage homosexuals to step out, especially in the US where there was still a lot of resistance and not so well known rules which targeted the gay lifestyle ("Sodomy Law"). The Rockist music listeners made their disgust very clear by the end of the decade and not just with the infamous record blowup sparked by a DJ who was out of a job once his station decided to switch to a Disco/Dance format - you can also catty that to a lot of the US' response to New Pop/New Wave in the Early 80's. True, there were a lot of gimmicks, drugs, fast living, Disco Ducks, Boogie Nights, and such, but there was a lot of codes in the music which subverted if you were listening, although of course there were a few bold songs and - you might say that nothing was hidden when you hear Sylvester sing "You Make Me Feel Mighty Real" once you knew what he was about and how that song may have reflected a liberation in some listeners. For all human sexuality that accepted if one was straight/gay/bi, it was a time that did have some serious messages although sadly covered in a lot of glitter and fun, but as the song said "Love Is the Message", and in a time after Nixon almost had a nation under pre-80's Religious Right oppression, that was all one needed to hear to feel at least liberated.

In this light, I have the feeling that this is where I'm getting at...

Sometimes, especially after eras of Republican Presidency, the messages turn to personal matters possibly to re-assure those on the outside that they have a vital part in living while there's still a lot of resistance. Sadly, many of these messages can be very campy although maybe that's the way to attract them. In one's list of modern examples I see a lot of self-assurance, and while I admittedly viewed that with sarcasm in another topic, I took a step back and though again for a few seconds.

The only thing I see wrong today is the way that it's presented. Too smothering and not real enough, almost like Bubblegum with an attitude. Those on the Right/Tea Party side have easy targets - too many cliches and not enough reality. Sadly, it's possibly where the Mainstream Media wants it to be.

Getting back to Politics...

The music industry has way too many connections for an artist to actually make a deadly serious political message these days - maybe some lip service to the side they're on, but something not as hard hitting as before with maybe a few exceptions here and there. Plus, those who might be interested in making a deep message have years of well-known banana peel slips of the career connected to shouting out something but not having the conviction to make things a lifelong commitment. Plus, there's also several well known examples in the arts of those who burned out after some massive fights with "The Powers That Be" (Think TV's Smothers Brothers who returned very neutered in The 70's or legendary Comedian Lenny Bruce who just turned to the needle). It takes guts to stand out, but in this hyper-watching era of critics and listeners who take note of every contradiction, you know that it's going to take more smarts, and that involves knowing when and where to make your stand if you really want to voice something.

Today in the end, the only musicians trying to make an impact either personally or politically know that they have to usually work independently. This is not a critique but an observation. Just my viewpoint.

Last edited by Screen13; 03-29-2014 at 01:16 PM.
Screen13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 01:05 PM   #97 (permalink)
Out of Place
 
Black Francis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: in an abstract house
Posts: 4,004
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by realtalk92

In today's current mainstream scene it is much harder for African American R&B artists to cross over making R&B music. The industry has currently designed that genre where only White artists that make R&B music can cross over. The industry promotes those white artist's R&B songs on popular stations and outlets which automatically allows them to reach a wider audience compared to the African American R&B artists that pretty much just play on R&B stations.
hahaha wtf are you talking about?

Sometimes you remind me of conspiracy brotha you always gotta play that race card.

What more credit can you give to black ppl? they practically invented music and influenced a whole generation of suburban wiggas, and why is that? oh right, CAUSE THEY PLAY THEIR SONGS ON THE RADIO!

I honestly don't think it's a racial thing AT ALL, if a white girl makes a better R & B song than a black girl she deserves that spot on the radio.
__________________
"Hey Kids you got to meet the MIGHTY PIXIES!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbRbCtIgW3A
Black Francis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 01:05 PM   #98 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Screen13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,367
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YorkeDaddy View Post
I post 20 songs from this decade that were all great songs and dont even get a response for it

my work is not appreciated here
You're the one who wrote the list of modern examples, and I think that you inspired my views in my last post.
Screen13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 01:12 PM   #99 (permalink)
Oracle
 
RoxyRollah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Closer then you think.....
Posts: 3,982
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by realtalk92 View Post
When I made that comment I was speaking "generally" and really speaking for our current society, not in reference to the 60's.

In a way the current popular music scene reflects that we do not care about social issues anymore and as a people I think we do need to come together again. It seems like our morals and values have been lost.
It's not a question of them being lost, it's a question of them changing. Ideas and beliefs change.Just like fashions styles and trends.

I don't think the morals are lost, they simply changed.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuitarBizarre View Post
Roxy is unable to perpetrate violence. It always somehow turns into BDSM between two consenting adults.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland
I just want to say your tits are lovely.
Quote:
Originally Posted by grindy View Post
Roxy is the William S. Burroughs of our time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan View Post
I like Roxy, she's awesome and her taste in music far exceeds yours. Roxy is in the Major League bro, and you're like a sad clown in a two bit rodeo.
RoxyRollah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 01:12 PM   #100 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,304
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Screen13 View Post
Respect was written by Otis Redding, but Aretha's version gave it that extra dimension and definition.

Psychotic Reaction is just about hearing a guy's complaints about not getting a girl's love with an extra Psychedelic kick, but knowing the Garage Punk era offers a good reason why this song connected one the words were heard. "I must stay away" hits the "Old Man vs. Long Hair/Undesirable Teen" angle perfectly, and in the age when hair really meant a lot (it was an era when a few NBC affiliates decided not to show the Monkees for just being a show about Long Haired Rock Musicians, for example!) gives it more of that easy to relate to flavor, although that "Would you like to take a ride now" sounds wither sinister or clever (as in "Tell them you're going to the Library"). Obviously the lyrics sound more like they were just tossed off ("I can't get satisfaction!"...now where did we hear that one before? Ha! Ha!), but the delivery and style did offer it some substance.

If you're looking for something a little more meatier, a great replacement within the Garage Punk scene would be something from the 13'th Floor Elevators, who actually had some serious mind bending lyrics (Slip Inside This House, especially), or even The Music Machine, who's Sean Bonniwell had a way with inserting something thought provoking in his lyrics - ie their most popular song "Talk Talk" about a troubled teen with a heavy bout of paranoia and fear ("I cry out for justice and admit that I was wrong/I'll stay in hibernation until the talk subsides till gone").

A far better example is the Boyce/Hart classic "Last Train to Clarksville" made famous by the Monkees...

Last Train to Clarksville - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thanks!

And I knew Otis wrote that Aretha song but I was just pointing out the meaning it has today and what it signified when she covered it for women.

Even for Otis version, I would say the same for a man as well in a relationship.

Everyone deserves respect.

Also thanks for the info about the other song!
Soulflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes



© 2003-2020 Advameg, Inc.