Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Indie & Alternative
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-02-2012, 11:19 AM   #81 (permalink)
 
Zer0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ireland
Posts: 3,791
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GravitySlips View Post
I just saw Scratch Acid live - not something I ever thought I'd say. The mosh pit for 'Monsters' nearly killed me.

Unlike a Baptist is my favourite song by them - sounds like the Birthday Party, but with an off-the-rails American instead of Cave on vocals. Great band!
Was that at ATP? Damn I envy you. I'd say they were completely mental live.

Yeah they were actually labelled 'the American Birthday Party' by media back then. They both have a similar weird and unhinged vibe going on in their music.
__________________
Zer0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 01:02 PM   #82 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
GravitySlips's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,578
Default

Yep, ATP. They were absolutely mental, Yow is truly the perfect frontman for a band like they are. Crowdsurfing while still screaming into the mic, he was all over the place. How he kept it together and was able to sing the songs I'll never know.
GravitySlips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 02:20 PM   #83 (permalink)
 
Zer0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ireland
Posts: 3,791
Default

Sigur Rós - Ágætis Byrjun (1999)



I really don’t quite know how to approach reviewing a Sigur Ros album because what their music makes me feel is difficult to describe, but here it goes. It was a choice between this and ( ), ( ) being the first album of theirs I bought and which really opened my ears to them. However it was Ágætis Byrjun which impacted me the most and continues to be my Sigur Ros album of choice to this day. Listening to the first song proper (after the intro track) ‘Svefn-g-englar’ it feels like you are in some sort of slow-motion dream. In fact I used to fall asleep listening to this album for a period and I used to let my imagination go into free-flow, which combined with oncoming sleepiness resulted in what was like a surreal and hazy flow of images in my imagination. The song that really takes your breath away however is ‘Ny Batteri’ with its soothing ambient intro and powerful, crashing dynamics later in the song. It’s pretty much Sigur Ros at their ultimate best and for people who are still curious to hear them this song demonstrates what they are all about. It’s powerful and emotional stuff. The reverb-heavy ‘Olsen Olsen’ recalls the dreamy, slow-motion sounds of ‘Svefn-g-englar’ while the title track soothes you almost like a lullaby. The perfect sounds really for drifting off to sleep or for just chilling the fuck out.

This album really is 'A Good Beginning' as the album title translated into English suggests. While it was not the band’s first album it was the first album of theirs to be released internationally and was the album that exposed them to the wider public in the few years after its release. The album also feels unbelievably fresh despite being recorded over thirteen years ago. The timeless sound of the music makes it feel like it could have been released at any time since then; it’s definitely a sign that the band did something right on this album.

Recommended Songs: ‘Svefn-g-englar’, ‘Ny Batteri’, 'Ágætis Byrjun'


Slowdive - Pygmalion (1995)



Why didn’t I review Souvlaki you ask? Because that would have been too predictable of me. Besides if there’s one album that certainly deserves more credit it’s their final album Pygmalion. While Souvlaki was their most accessible album, here they did a u-turn and wandered down the path of minimalist ambient music, leaving their shoegaze days behind. If I haven’t already lost you by this point I can safely say that Pygmalion is an album that really deserves your time and patience if you have yet to venture past Souvlaki. It’s not an album that grabs you straight away but it does reward you immensely with repeated listens. If you listen to the sparse ten-minute opening song ‘Rutti’ you should notice how the short gaps of silence are almost as vital as the sounds themselves. It’s almost as if they want you to fill in the gaps yourself with your own imagination. The album does carry a very downbeat, detached and isolated mood throughout its duration and it does an effective job of pulling you into its own little world. The use of repeating vocals and instrumentation throughout the album, especially on songs such ‘Crazy for You’, ‘Trellisaze’ and ‘J’s Heaven’, are hypnotic yet soothing and add to this feeling of detachment. It’s not until the last three songs ‘Visions of La’, ‘Blue Skied an’ Clear’ and ‘All of Us’ that we hear something resembling songs in the traditional sense. ‘Blue Skied an’ Clear’ in particular is the real highlight and its beautiful and uplifting sounds really break the downbeat mood of the album quite superbly.

You could say that an album like this after Souvlaki would be commercial suicide, and that is pretty much what it was. Creation dropped them not long after and the album wasn’t even officially released in the US until recent years. Not that the band or Creation really cared as they had been failing to see eye-to-eye with each other for some time. The album marked the end of the band but the beginning of their wonderful legacy which grew over time. Gradually people are beginning to discover the delights of this album.

Recommended Songs: ‘Rutti’, ‘Crazy for You’, ‘Blue Skied an’ Clear’
__________________
Zer0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 02:33 PM   #84 (permalink)
Groupie
 
zxlkho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Blacksburg, VA
Posts: 29
Default

mmmm Sigur Ros. Definitely one of my favorite bands, though I prefer ( ) to AB.
__________________
Last.fm
zxlkho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 07:32 PM   #85 (permalink)
Key
hi
 
Key's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 12,320
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zer0 View Post
Sigur Rós - Ágætis Byrjun (1999)



I really don’t quite know how to approach reviewing a Sigur Ros album because what their music makes me feel is difficult to describe, but here it goes. It was a choice between this and ( ), ( ) being the first album of theirs I bought and which really opened my ears to them. However it was Ágætis Byrjun which impacted me the most and continues to be my Sigur Ros album of choice to this day. Listening to the first song proper (after the intro track) ‘Svefn-g-englar’ it feels like you are in some sort of slow-motion dream. In fact I used to fall asleep listening to this album for a period and I used to let my imagination go into free-flow, which combined with oncoming sleepiness resulted in what was like a surreal and hazy flow of images in my imagination. The song that really takes your breath away however is ‘Ny Batteri’ with its soothing ambient intro and powerful, crashing dynamics later in the song. It’s pretty much Sigur Ros at their ultimate best and for people who are still curious to hear them this song demonstrates what they are all about. It’s powerful and emotional stuff. The reverb-heavy ‘Olsen Olsen’ recalls the dreamy, slow-motion sounds of ‘Svefn-g-englar’ while the title track soothes you almost like a lullaby. The perfect sounds really for drifting off to sleep or for just chilling the fuck out.

This album really is 'A Good Beginning' as the album title translated into English suggests. While it was not the band’s first album it was the first album of theirs to be released internationally and was the album that exposed them to the wider public in the few years after its release. The album also feels unbelievably fresh despite being recorded over thirteen years ago. The timeless sound of the music makes it feel like it could have been released at any time since then; it’s definitely a sign that the band did something right on this album.
Took me a little while to get into this album when I first heard it, but it grew on me, a lot.
__________________

CWH
Key is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2012, 02:12 PM   #86 (permalink)
 
Zer0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ireland
Posts: 3,791
Default

Sonic Youth - EVOL (1986)



EVOL marked the moment where Sonic Youth moved away from the less accessible experimental art-rock of their early releases Sonic Youth, Confusion Is Sex and Bad Moon Rising and onto something more coherent. EVOL pretty much established the template for following releases with its mix of more recognisable song structures and melodies and experimental textures which still retained their early avant-garde feel. It marked the beginning of my favourite phase in Sonic Youth’s history which also includes 1987’s Sister and 1988’s Daydream Nation. Songs like ‘Tom Violence’ and ‘Green Light’ still retain a dark and weary atmosphere yet have an urgency and focus that was somewhat lacking in their music before. The Kim Gordon-fronted ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ is the real gem here. Kim’s sexy, whispered voice sits on top of a calming psychedelic landscape before the tension builds and spills over into an outpouring of frustrated vocals and noisy guitars. The results are jaw-dropping. ‘Starpower’ sets the template for a lot of typical Sonic Youth songs with its vaguely melodic vocals, oddly-tuned guitars and of course some guitar noise thrown in for good measure, just in case. What’s not to love? There’s still plenty of discordant and loose moments on this album, such as the chaotic ‘In The Kingdom #19’ which features distinctive spoken-word vocals from Lee Ranaldo over grinding and screeching guitars. The album ends with Thurston Moore’s magnificent and sprawling ‘Expressway to Yr. Skull’ which is right up there with the best of the best Sonic Youth songs. If you ever get the chance watch the film 1991: The Year Punk Broke, where the live performance of this song makes for an unforgettable ending to the film.

EVOL was also the first album with Steve Shelley on drums, thus the definitive line-up was in place and the chemistry in the band seems just right on this album. EVOL showed signs of the indie-rock underground gathering momentum and influencing everything from Seattle grunge to British shoegazing. A key album in alternative music’s history.

Recommended Songs: ‘Tom Violence’, ‘Shadow of a Doubt’, ‘Expressway to Yr. Skull’


Spacemen 3 - The Perfect Prescription (1987)



This album is indeed the perfect prescription if you require a dosage of feel-good, psychedelic rock. Here the band build on the minimal psych-rock of their 1986 debut Sound Of Confusion, adding more depth and variety to their sound and accessing the outer reaches of your mind from new angles. It’s well known that the band openly embraced drug culture and supported the legalisation of drugs. The Perfect Prescription is sort of a concept album in a way, intending to chart the highs and lows of a psychedelic drug trip. The opener ‘Take Me to the Other Side’ is its rallying call and a wonderful slab of spaced-out, uplifting garage rock. Quite interestingly the band display a religious music influence on ‘Walkin’ With Jesus’ and ‘Ode To Street Hassle’, something new and different from Sound Of Confusion. It has a calming and almost spiritual effect on the listener yet can also be linked to the fuzzy feeling of the effect of drugs coming on. The album peaks however with the swirling, hallucinogenic sounds of ‘Transparent Radiation’, you’ll be tripping balls by this stage. The words and music paint a landscape of vivid colours and you almost feel high just by listening to this. ‘Things Will Never Be The Same’ shows the power of repetition and minimalism and what it can achieve while ‘Come Down Easy’ has a very easy going, almost Beatles-like feel to it. Of course you have to come back down to earth eventually, and ‘Call The Doctor’ takes you into a darker place and leaves you feeling helpless and alone.

Spacemen 3 had it their stride by this album and it was something that they would continue on 1989’s Playing With Fire. They still feel like a complete band here as the divide had yet to fully develop between Jason “J. Spaceman” Pierce and Pete “Sonic Boom” Kember. This album, along with their first, also paved the way for co-conspirators such as The Telescopes and Loop to assault ears and minds with their own brand of fuzzed-out psychedelic rock as well as having an influence on countless bands ever since.

Recommended Songs: ‘Take Me to the Other Side’, ‘Transparent Radiation’, ‘Come Down Easy’
__________________
Zer0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2013, 10:06 AM   #87 (permalink)
 
Zer0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ireland
Posts: 3,791
Default

I Started Something I Couldn't Finish.

Swirlies - They Spent Their Wild Youthful Days in the Glittering World of the Salons (1996)



Hailing from Boston these guys and girls sounded like the bastard children of Sonic Youth and My Bloody Valentine. Seriously I don't fucking know what to write here. While their oddly-tuned, angular guitars and mumbled, half-heard vocals are undoubtedly homage to the noisy gods and goddesses of indie rock mentioned, their sound has something else which I cannot describe, but I’ll do my best. In a way they sound like they’re making music and fucking around with the formula of 90's indie rock for their own amusement. Their sense of humour shines through in the interludes and the more experimental tracks on this album such as ‘You Can’t Be Told It, You Must Behold It’, ‘Do Any of You Know Anything About Love?’ and the oddly bizarre yet fascinating ‘Untitled’. Of course when the band are playing it (almost) straight they are seriously good. The almost metal riffage and screeching guitars of ‘San Cristobal de Las Casas’ makes this song a particular standout and for some nice hazy, shoegazey guitar goodness feast your ears and imagination on ‘Two Girls Kissing’. The highlight of the album of course is the magnificent ‘Sunn’ which gives you some wonderfully inventive use of guitar sounds married to some tantalising melodies. In short it’s one of the best shoegaze songs ever.

Between this album and their full-length debut Blonder Tongue Audio Baton you can’t go too far wrong for some quality 90’s indie rock with a twist. I chose this album over their debut because the songs are just that bit more memorable and the experimental moments are that bit more out-there and intriguing. Then there’s that mouthful of an album title which I can never seem to decode.

Recommended Songs: ‘San Cristobal de Las Casas’, ‘Sunn’, ‘Untitled’


Teenage Fanclub - Bandwagonesque (1991)



Their uneven debut album A Catholic Education had all the signs of a band on their way up but missing that special little spark. Lo and behold that little spark came on 1991’s Bandwagonesque and the band were forever to be worshipped as power-pop and slacker torch-bearers. One of the first things about this album you’ll notice is how unmistakably 90’s it is. You can almost feel your hair going floppy just by listening to it. You could argue that the oh-so 90’s production sounds badly dated but to me it’s almost part of its charm, with songs as good as these that shouldn’t matter one bit in the slightest. Nearly every song on this twelve track album will remind you why you love 90’s indie rock, right from the epic opener ‘The Concept’ up to the epic instrumental closer ‘Is This Music?’ Meanwhile songs like ‘Metal Baby’, ‘What You Do to Me’, and ‘Alcoholiday’ will remind you what it’s like to be helplessly smitten with someone.

Listening to the lyrics of ‘Guiding Star’ always makes me feel some kind of reassurance in myself and reminds me that my life isn’t going to go around in circles. Even the entire album has a warm and blissful tone to it which makes you feel great on the inside. 1995’s Grand Prix and 1997’s Songs From Northern Britain are also well worth checking out for reasons of their own but Bandwagonesque is the best starting point in my view. It’s also well known that this album pipped Nirvana’s Nevermind to become Spin Magazine’s number one album of 1991, deservingly so.

Recommended Songs: ‘The Concept’, ‘Guiding Star’, ‘Is This Music?’
__________________
Zer0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2013, 12:20 AM   #88 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1
Default

I'm glad this thread is back running again (well, relatively). I remember browsing this thread more than a year ago. Looking back, it definitely shaped my music taste. Thank you for this awesome thread.
ws9167 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2013, 05:17 AM   #89 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Deviouz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: With ur mama...
Posts: 299
Default

Great list, please finish it! I've picked up so many albums that are being spun on my iPod daily!

Great job, Zer0!
Deviouz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2013, 09:48 AM   #90 (permalink)
 
Zer0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ireland
Posts: 3,791
Default

Thanks guys! I suppose I'd better finish it so...
__________________
Zer0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.