Bossa Nova & Brazilian Jazz - Music Banter Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Jazz & Blues
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-30-2019, 01:49 PM   #31 (permalink)
Exo
All day jazz and biscuits
 
Exo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 7,021
Default

One of these days I'm going through all of this.
__________________
LastFM

SUPREME POO BAH MODERATOR EXTRAORDINAIRE
Exo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2019, 01:51 PM   #32 (permalink)
só, somente só
 
xico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 91
Default

Have a nice journey!
xico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2019, 06:19 PM   #33 (permalink)
só, somente só
 
xico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 91
Default

xico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2019, 06:27 PM   #34 (permalink)
só, somente só
 
xico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 91
Default

Samba Obscuro (Obscure Samba), a wonderful mixtape by Kiko Dinucci, consisting of great sambas with melancholic lyrics

xico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2020, 12:06 PM   #35 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 10
Default

Sergio Mendes and Brazil 66 were my introduction to bossa nova and Brazilian music. Mas que Nada is a classic.
GOING FOR A SONG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2020, 08:24 AM   #36 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Fantomas72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Italy
Posts: 270
Default

I love Azymuth ...música muito bonita !




__________________
''I love great music - it has no color, it has no boundaries.'' MJ.
Fantomas72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2021, 08:49 AM   #37 (permalink)
só, somente só
 
xico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 91
Default

Azymuth is always a good trip!
xico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2021, 08:52 AM   #38 (permalink)
só, somente só
 
xico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 91
Default

Sergio Mendes is an amazing pianist! I also recommend you to listen to Mas Que Nada on Jorge Benjor and Elza Soares voices
xico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2021, 09:38 AM   #39 (permalink)
só, somente só
 
xico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 91
Default

Four of the greatest ladies on Bossa!

1. 'Bossa, Balanço, Balada' (1963) Sylvia Telles was already a respected and renowned singer, with some years of activity before Bossa Nova came around the Brazilian music scene. In 1959, amazed by that cool and innovative new style of playing Samba, she had the idea of working on an album entirely dedicated to the compositions of Antonio Carlos Jobim. It was on this album, recorded by the Elenco label that she had proved she has got everything to be the greatest singer of Bossa. Tragically just after three years of the release of this masterpiece she had died in a car accident, putting an abrupt end to a brilliant and promising career.



2. 'Vagamente' (1964) Album-icon of the second phase of Bossa Nova, this is the debut of the 20 year old young Wanda Sa, produced by the great guitarist Roberto Menescal. This work got together young and talented compositors like Marcos Valle, players like Eumir Deodato and Sergio Mendes, and the young performer singing in a modern jazz vibe, with a husky and soft voice.



3. 'Nara' (1964) Nara Leao was so intimate of Bossa Nova that at the same time she made her debut on the movement she despised it for being a thing of the upper-class. She introduced in this album modern arrangements and sang compositions of artists from humbler origins than her like Ze Keti and Paulinho Da Viola (a.k.a the lord of the Samba).



4. 'Joyce' (1968) The debut album of one of the few female singer-songwriters of Bossa Nova gave her national and international recognition. She brings an interesting influence of Chorinho (one of the first forms of samba) to Joyce's happy, and fresh Bossa.

xico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2022, 03:12 PM   #40 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Indrid Cold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Posts: 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psy-Fi View Post
I stumbled across this album a year or so ago while I was looking for something else. Japanese bossa nova that sounds convincing enough that it almost could have come right out of Brazil during the 1960's...

Japan is the second home of bossa nova which they have been performing and recording since the early 60s. In Japan, it is not unusual to walk into a bar on karaoke night and watch people sing bossa nova all night long. It's very popular. In fact, the Japanese have spread it to Korea and Vietnam. A great many Japanese bossa nova artists go to Brazil and vice-versa. A lot of Brazilian artists have learned to sing their songs in Japanese just in case they end up going to Japan. I don't how the pandemic has affected all that.
Indrid Cold is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2022 Advameg, Inc.