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Old 01-22-2022, 04:17 PM   #41 (permalink)
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https://youtu.be/Zes9yQaSwQk

Choro music is highly important in the evolution of Brazilian music. Bossa nova has roots in choro which is over a century old and very melodic. The musicians are highly skilled. It is not an easy form of music to master but it is beautiful.
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Old 05-07-2022, 02:45 PM   #42 (permalink)
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Is Cartola considered Bossa Nova? I remember starting with Chico Buarque it becomes MPB or something like that.
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Old 06-23-2022, 10:02 PM   #43 (permalink)
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So many good ones: Stan Getz, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Joao Gilberto, Luiz Bonfa, Astrud Gilberto, and I can just keep going.
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Old 08-15-2022, 10:54 AM   #44 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indrid Cold View Post

Choro music is highly important in the evolution of Brazilian music. Bossa nova has roots in choro which is over a century old and very melodic. The musicians are highly skilled. It is not an easy form of music to master but it is beautiful.
Just found a great one who comes from that tradition called Paulinho da Viola.
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Old 12-06-2022, 02:57 PM   #45 (permalink)
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Vera Cruz is beautiful. Heard versions like Pat Metheny, Dave Williams Big Band, Mark Murphy.. but only recently found out about the Milton Nascimento / Márcio Borges 1969 original.


www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVX0QNivG3Q
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Old 11-24-2023, 08:56 AM   #46 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indrid Cold View Post
Choro music is highly important in the evolution of Brazilian music. Bossa nova has roots in choro which is over a century old and very melodic. The musicians are highly skilled. It is not an easy form of music to master but it is beautiful.
Well noticed! I would say Choro is the Brazilian equivalent of Jazz (or Blues perhaps) in the US, one of the oldest genres of music, it blends European strings and African percussion, and strongly influences most modern music produced in that country. It is also very traditional in the bohemian culture of the cities in the region of Rio-São Paulo.


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Old 11-25-2023, 02:53 PM   #47 (permalink)
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Default Four Bossa-Pop Tracks

"Fugiu Com A Novela" by Vanessa da Mata, from "Sim" (2008):

One of the most successful and popular interpreters of MPB in the 2000's, Vanessa's productions icorporate a wide range of rythms like samba, afrobeat, reggae, tropicalia, rock, and of course, bossa nova. Some of her best known musics that became a hit were featured in telenovelas that were absurdly popular in Brazil, not the case of this track, but ironically its title means 'She left me for the soap opera'.




"Balada do Amor Inabalável" by Skank, from "Skank" (2000):

An uncommon incursion of pop-rock band Skank into the genre of bossa nova, bringing pop aesthetics to the chilled rythms and the simple lyrics about love sung with a characteristic swing of bossa.




"Tafetá (feat. João Donato)" by Tulipa Ruiz, from "Dancê" (2015):

Representing newest generation of MPB, Tulipa collaborates with bossa legend João Donato, mixing tradition with the experimentation that distinguish great part her work.




"Sina" by Gilberto Gil, from "Parabolicamará" (1992):

Gil made his debut in 1967 with a whole album of bossa nova, but what keeps him among the most popular artists from back then to this very present day is his infinite ability to innovate, as demonstrated in this bossa-pop rework of the well known 'Sina' written and first released by Djavan in his sophisti-pop album 'Luz' from 1982.

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