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Old 08-06-2012, 07:41 PM   #131 (permalink)
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Just wanted to pop in and say thanks for introducing me to Swans and Boris Kovac. I probably wouldn't have looked into either of them without your write-ups and I've really been enjoying both albums!
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Old 08-07-2012, 05:44 AM   #132 (permalink)
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Just wanted to pop in and say thanks for introducing me to Swans and Boris Kovac. I probably wouldn't have looked into either of them without your write-ups and I've really been enjoying both albums!
Thanks! I'm glad to hear it.
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i'm not gonna spend my life on music banter trying to convince people the earth is flat.
A Night in the Life of the Invisible Man

Time & Place

25 Albums You Should Hear Before the Moon Crashes into the Earth and We All Die


last.fm
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Old 08-09-2012, 09:17 PM   #133 (permalink)
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4. Grandaddy—Sumday (2003)

I'm OK with my decay.
I have no choice.
I have no voice.
I have no say on my decay.
I have no choice
so I'll rejoice.

—"OK with My Decay" Grandaddy

In some other house, in some other part of the world, a young couple lies in bed staring into each other's eyes. They've only been married for five years, and have no children thankfully, but when they look at each other they still feel the same fire they felt when they first met. Outside, the sky is dark and red and angry, the earth-rending percussion of impact shaking everything. Pictures fall from their walls, the house creaks, but the two of them press their foreheads together and gaze into out-of-focus eyes, trying with every ounce of mental strength to conjure memories to escape into: a sunny drive up the coast, laughter, goofy pictures, camping on the beach.

This kind of feeling—this warmth in the face of destruction—is what Sumday is all about. I actually had a very hard time deciding between this album and Grandaddy's album The Sophtware Slump for this list, but in the end I decided that the latter was just a little too dark, a little too pessimistic for what I was going for. Sumday is the perfect combination of beauty and the knowledge that all beautiful things come to an end. The arrangements are lush, the melodies sunny. The songwriting is compact and gorgeous but suffused with substantial clouds of modern world angst, just like good pop music should be. The lyrics are cynical yet whimsical, silly yet heartfelt, with a sensibility that can best be compared to Kurt Vonnegut finding humor in the face of tragedy.

This album, like the best pop albums, has its upbeat tracks and its downbeat tracks, but there is a definite trajectory here from upbeat to downbeat, from social commentary to introspection. What would be side one, if this were a vinyl or cassette release, blasts out of the gate with the cheery and energetic "Now It's on" but quickly reveals the album's pained beating heart with "I'm on Standby". "The Go in the Go for It" and "The Group Who Couldn't Say" retreat to mid-tempo breeziness, but bitter lyrics and a heartfelt piano interlude reveal this to be a feint. Conversely, "Lost on Yer Merry Way" and "El Caminos in the West" deceive with lighthearted titles but still cut like a recent breakup. Side two doesn't even pretend to hide it's sadness and existential angst, opening with the dual open wounds of "'Yeah' is What We Had" and "Saddest Vacant Lot in All the World". For a moment the band masquerades in a playful fashion with the album's catchiest song "Stray Dog and the Chocolate Shake"—though once again lyrics implying isolation and regret haunt the carefree tune—then they quickly descend into an emotional black hole of introspection. This probably sounds like a criticism, but I assure you it isn't. "OK with My Decay" and "The Warming Sun" are two of the most gut-wrenchingly stunning and emotionally raw pop songs of the past decade or two—and the latter is responsible for coining the wonderful word "overmisunderstood". After them, the world really does feel like it might be ending. "The Final Push Toward the Sum" finishes things nicely, broken but with a faint glimmer of hope, which is right about where our little story stands at this very moment.



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i'm not gonna spend my life on music banter trying to convince people the earth is flat.
A Night in the Life of the Invisible Man

Time & Place

25 Albums You Should Hear Before the Moon Crashes into the Earth and We All Die


last.fm
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Old 08-09-2012, 09:54 PM   #134 (permalink)
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Old 08-09-2012, 10:15 PM   #135 (permalink)
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What the pump?
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Originally Posted by P A N View Post
i'm not gonna spend my life on music banter trying to convince people the earth is flat.
A Night in the Life of the Invisible Man

Time & Place

25 Albums You Should Hear Before the Moon Crashes into the Earth and We All Die


last.fm
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Old 08-09-2012, 10:20 PM   #136 (permalink)
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It's a joke based on the 2000 video game The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask where the moon crashes into the game world and kills everyone in 72 hours after starting the game. Given that you only have 3 albums left to review I felt it was appropriate.
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Old 08-09-2012, 10:26 PM   #137 (permalink)
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You kids and your video games.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P A N View Post
i'm not gonna spend my life on music banter trying to convince people the earth is flat.
A Night in the Life of the Invisible Man

Time & Place

25 Albums You Should Hear Before the Moon Crashes into the Earth and We All Die


last.fm
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Old 08-11-2012, 02:47 PM   #138 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Janszoon View Post
In some other house, in some other part of the world, a young couple lies in bed staring into each other's eyes. They've only been married for five years, and have no children thankfully, but when they look at each other they still feel the same fire they felt when they first met. Outside, the sky is dark and red and angry, the earth-rending percussion of impact shaking everything. Pictures fall from their walls, the house creaks, but the two of them press their foreheads together and gaze into out-of-focus eyes, trying with every ounce of mental strength to conjure memories to escape into: a sunny drive up the coast, laughter, goofy pictures, camping on the beach.

This kind of feeling—this warmth in the face of destruction—is what Sumday is all about. I actually had a very hard time deciding between this album and Grandaddy's album The Sophtware Slump for this list, but in the end I decided that the latter was just a little too dark, a little too pessimistic for what I was going for. Sumday is the perfect combination of beauty and the knowledge that all beautiful things come to an end. The arrangements are lush, the melodies sunny. The songwriting is compact and gorgeous but suffused with substantial clouds of modern world angst, just like good pop music should be. The lyrics are cynical yet whimsical, silly yet heartfelt, with a sensibility that can best be compared to Kurt Vonnegut finding humor in the face of tragedy.

This album, like the best pop albums, has its upbeat tracks and its downbeat tracks, but there is a definite trajectory here from upbeat to downbeat, from social commentary to introspection. What would be side one, if this were a vinyl or cassette release, blasts out of the gate with the cheery and energetic "Now It's on" but quickly reveals the album's pained beating heart with "I'm on Standby". "The Go in the Go for It" and "The Group Who Couldn't Say" retreat to mid-tempo breeziness, but bitter lyrics and a heartfelt piano interlude reveal this to be a feint. Conversely, "Lost on Yer Merry Way" and "El Caminos in the West" deceive with lighthearted titles but still cut like a recent breakup. Side two doesn't even pretend to hide it's sadness and existential angst, opening with the dual open wounds of "'Yeah' is What We Had" and "Saddest Vacant Lot in All the World". For a moment the band masquerades in a playful fashion with the album's catchiest song "Stray Dog and the Chocolate Shake"—though once again lyrics implying isolation and regret haunt the carefree tune—then they quickly descend into an emotional black hole of introspection. This probably sounds like a criticism, but I assure you it isn't. "OK with My Decay" and "The Warming Sun" are two of the most gut-wrenchingly stunning and emotionally raw pop songs of the past decade or two—and the latter is responsible for coining the wonderful word "overmisunderstood". After them, the world really does feel like it might be ending. "The Final Push Toward the Sum" finishes things nicely, broken but with a faint glimmer of hope, which is right about where our little story stands at this very moment.
So excellent. Is your writing getting even better? I know I wish I was living out the end of this world in the way that you describe in the 1st paragraph instead of...how I am doing it.

Also, great album choice. I've always loved it and I still think it's Jason Lytle's best work.
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Old 08-11-2012, 08:22 PM   #139 (permalink)
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So excellent. Is your writing getting even better? I know I wish I was living out the end of this world in the way that you describe in the 1st paragraph instead of...how I am doing it.
Thanks man! It really means a lot to me to hear you say that.

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Also, great album choice. I've always loved it and I still think it's Jason Lytle's best work.
I've actually never heard anything he's done outside of Grandaddy. Do you know if his solo stuff is worth checking out?
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Originally Posted by P A N View Post
i'm not gonna spend my life on music banter trying to convince people the earth is flat.
A Night in the Life of the Invisible Man

Time & Place

25 Albums You Should Hear Before the Moon Crashes into the Earth and We All Die


last.fm
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Old 08-12-2012, 01:38 AM   #140 (permalink)
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I've actually never heard anything he's done outside of Grandaddy. Do you know if his solo stuff is worth checking out?
I barely remember what I've heard but I distinctly recall thinking that nothing I've heard of his solo stuff is nearly as good as Grandaddy. And Sumday is my favorite Grandaddy album.
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