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Old 08-10-2010, 05:23 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by JakeDTH View Post
So it would be best to tune the drum with itself, to a note that sounds best, and than use a tuner to see what note it actually is so that tuning the same drum next time around will be accurate? What I'm looking for is consistency, I know drums can only do so much and aren't intended to always have a perfect tune like guitars.

My brothers' problem is probably their inability to hear for any particular note each tuning.
Yea, I mean... definitely do your initial tuning and find the zone (without paying much attention to the actual key it's in) that sustains smooth and clean, and yes, it would be a good idea to get a tuner to see what key it's in for future reference. That would definitely make it easier when you have to do maintenance tuning or when you re-skin the drums. Just remember to let the drum itself dictate what key/note you end up with and the kit will sound a lot better. Each drum piece is a specific size for a reason. They will naturally be the correct note for the kit if you tune them according to what we went over.

Another thing to consider is the situation the drums are going to be in... if they're going to be played live, at a show or something, you definitely want maximum sustain on your toms because it gets really drowned out in the rest of the band. If your toms are muffled excessively or not tuned correctly, they end up sounding like boxes.
Also, the biggest mistake I see people making when they tune their drums is when they only reference the sound the drum makes when they're sitting on them. The problem with that is most of the sound is coming straight up at you, and straight down through the resonant heads... while it sounds nice there, it sounds a lot different when you're a distance away from the kit and not subjected to those two positions. So having someone soundcheck the kit while you stand in different places is important. Having maximum sustain will ensure there's enough in places other than the 2 hotspots, even if it sounds like there's too much directly above and below the kit.
Obviously, if you're micing the kit, the best sound needs to come from wherever you're micing it, so keep all that in mind when you're tuning and you'll get the best results for the situation.
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Old 08-11-2010, 03:59 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Freebase Dali View Post
Yea, I mean... definitely do your initial tuning and find the zone (without paying much attention to the actual key it's in) that sustains smooth and clean, and yes, it would be a good idea to get a tuner to see what key it's in for future reference. That would definitely make it easier when you have to do maintenance tuning or when you re-skin the drums. Just remember to let the drum itself dictate what key/note you end up with and the kit will sound a lot better. Each drum piece is a specific size for a reason. They will naturally be the correct note for the kit if you tune them according to what we went over.

Another thing to consider is the situation the drums are going to be in... if they're going to be played live, at a show or something, you definitely want maximum sustain on your toms because it gets really drowned out in the rest of the band. If your toms are muffled excessively or not tuned correctly, they end up sounding like boxes.
Also, the biggest mistake I see people making when they tune their drums is when they only reference the sound the drum makes when they're sitting on them. The problem with that is most of the sound is coming straight up at you, and straight down through the resonant heads... while it sounds nice there, it sounds a lot different when you're a distance away from the kit and not subjected to those two positions. So having someone soundcheck the kit while you stand in different places is important. Having maximum sustain will ensure there's enough in places other than the 2 hotspots, even if it sounds like there's too much directly above and below the kit.
Obviously, if you're micing the kit, the best sound needs to come from wherever you're micing it, so keep all that in mind when you're tuning and you'll get the best results for the situation.
Great! Thanks for all the information. We are planning on recording our music first and putting it up on our website and MySpace before playing any shows, that way we can point people to where they may hear the songs again. So the point about tuning them appropriate when recording and when playing live is really helpful.
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Old 09-15-2010, 06:58 PM   #23 (permalink)
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I didnt know drums was tuneable or they could get out of tune i knew pillows in the drums changed the sound put dang their tuneable that amazing lol all this info for me as a newbie has been great thanks for the thread. Dude hope your bros band learn diff in broken n not broken lol
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