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Old 06-26-2012, 11:53 AM   #131 (permalink)
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I was just screwing around on my guitar, thought the descending bass line sounded cool. It's just something that sprung upon me and I haven't had the chance to mess around with it some more. I was just trying to get the key signature so I could mess around with some soloing, but i couldn't figure it out. It totally slipped my mind that it can also be called Bb.
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Old 06-28-2012, 12:44 PM   #132 (permalink)
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How about e minor/b minor/ a minor?

What key is it? It looks like those chords fall under the key of G major, but that doesnt make sense. As I'm soloing over the progression, the notes B and D sound the most like the tonic. I can't figure it out.
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Old 06-29-2012, 05:08 AM   #133 (permalink)
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How about e minor/b minor/ a minor?

What key is it? It looks like those chords fall under the key of G major, but that doesnt make sense. As I'm soloing over the progression, the notes B and D sound the most like the tonic. I can't figure it out.
That's e minor. Except for it to work the progression should be Em/Am/B(7). This follows the standard formula of I - IV - V7 (or in this case it would be i - iv - V7). The 5th chord (V7) is always major.
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Old 06-29-2012, 08:20 AM   #134 (permalink)
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Even if I threw a g and a c major in there it wouldn't be in G? I was looking at my key chart and all those chords fall under G major. I was doing some soloing over the progression and I found some notes that worked, so I kept messing around discovered it was the G major scale I was playing. It sounds weird that the G major scale would work over those minor chords, but it does. I'll do some soloing in E and see if that sounds better.
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Old 07-04-2012, 07:46 AM   #135 (permalink)
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blastingas 10:
"What key is this progression in? A minor/C major/E7/A# major."

Burning Down was correct that you can make that A# major chord into a Bb Major one.

Doing this will give you the neapolitan effect (bII). It is, as notated, a Major triad built on the b2. You can label this as "N6" (they're usually found in their first inversion) or just simply "N" if you're feeling crafty.

Your whole progression then (in the key of a minor of course) is then : i III V7 N(6). Pretty simple. Remember than Neapolitans are usually predominant functions, so they usually want to go to a V or a vii. Keep this in mind, and follow suit if you want a 'normal' sounding progression. Or break the rule and be a bad-ass rebel. That's always fun too.

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As for your e minor/b minor / a minor, the v (B minor in the key of e minor) is usually Major instead, as Burning Down has stated. However, don't forget that the Major (dominant) V(7) chord belongs to the Harmonic minor scale, and that the natural minor's v chord is normally minor.

I've been analyzing Bach chorales lately and have come across many chords I can't describe except as minor v chords. They are peculiar, but if Bach can do it, why not let them exist?

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As for these chords being in the key of G Major, that's correct too.

G major and e minor are relative key signatures. This means they have the same number of Sharps and Flats.

The G Major scale is: G A B C D E F# G
The e natural minor scale is: E F# G A B C D E

Notice how they both only have one sharp, on F.

Thus, you get the same chords from them:

G Major, A minor, B minor, C Major, D Major, e minor, f# diminished.

If you want to make e harmonic minor, you simply raise the 7th note in the scale (in this case, the D) by adding a sharp. Your e harmonic minor scale is then E F# G A B C D# E.

With these notes, you get the following chords instead (different chords from previous are bolded):

e minor, f# diminished, G Augmented, a minor, B Major, C Major, d# diminished.

These sets of chords are semi all related based on that key signature with just the lone F#.

You should be able to have some fun with these selections of chords and moving around through progressions.
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:01 PM   #136 (permalink)
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Another question.

For example, if someone is playing an a minor chord and you want to play along, can you play only an a minor chord or are there any other chords in a that will work? Do you get what im saying? It might be hard to understand
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:17 PM   #137 (permalink)
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Another question.

For example, if someone is playing an a minor chord and you want to play along, can you play only an a minor chord or are there any other chords in a that will work? Do you get what im saying? It might be hard to understand
Playing at the same time, in sync? Play the same chord - it's already harmonized and your ears will thank you.
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:23 PM   #138 (permalink)
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Yes thats what I meant. I've just heard of some songs, like the Beatles "get back" for instance, where someone plays an A major and then someone else playing some sort of A7 at the same time.
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:24 PM   #139 (permalink)
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Yes thats what I meant. I've just heard of some songs, like the Beatles "get back" for instance, where someone plays an A major and then someone else playing some sort of A7 at the same time.
Well, you can do that because it's the same chord. You're just adding the 7th to it.
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:21 AM   #140 (permalink)
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Hello... I am not sure if I should ask this question in this thread.. :P

Does anybody know what is this type of guitar chords: D4_3, Bm4_3, A6_5?
I learnt from a professional that when you see a D4_3 you place your fingers like playing a normal D chord, but you also use your 4th finger placed on the 1st string, 3th fret (G note), and then you lift your 4th finger and you come back to the normal D chord.. I tried that and fits perfect with the song, but I don't understand what exactly the numbers 4_3 show... Can anyone help??
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