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Old 07-29-2012, 06:00 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Violin buying

Hiya!

I'm an absolute beginner and I want to buy my first violin. I'm not quite sure what kind I should pick. There are some things I don't understand - like, for example, if I should choose half, 3/4 of fullsize violin, which brands should I go for and what kind of a bow should I get? I'll be grateful for your help!
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:51 PM   #2 (permalink)
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If you're an average size adult, you'll want full size. Look for an instrument that at least has a solid top, as the wood will vibrate better and therefore sound better. I suggest a genuine horsehair bow, but economy versions'll do if you're just learning. Most violins come with a bow so you needn't worry about which bow though. The rosin type largely doesn't matter as much as far as I know (at the beginner level at least (just make sure it's violin rosin and not cello, viola or bass rosin)). I also suggest, this isn't necessary, getting a shoulder rest, they make the violin hold much easier. And with violin, proper posture and hold is everything.

As for brands, I'd suggest menzel because my violin is menzel and it sounds beautiful, but it really doesn't matter. At the beginning level everything's chinese-made anyway, so they're probably made under the same roof.

I also bid you good luck in learning! I'm learning myself, it's a tough instrument to master but a fun instrument to learn!
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:00 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Thank you for your help!
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Old 10-04-2012, 10:05 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Learn to play the violin...

If you have a passion to play the violin, then you can master the basics and play well. While you may not reach the level to challenge the masters of this instrument, you can become quite skillful and create a lifetime of musical joy when you learn to play violin. The first step however is to learn the basics, the foundation to understanding how to play the violin properly.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:59 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I recently purchased my first violin (got it last Friday, 9/28/12), and have been playing it daily since. My musicianship otherwise is pretty good, so the basics are just the mechanics of the fingerings; I don't have to learn the notes or rhythmic notation.

I went with an electric violin (cuz I think they look gorgeous and sleek).

A friend told me that if I wanted to teach myself to make sure that I get proper technique (posture, bow-hold, etc) down first; because it's a very difficult habit to correct later. Practice in front of a mirror and be critical and you'll develop good habits.

I also purchased two series - Strictly Strings (Violin edition) has 3 volumes, and then the Suzuki series. These give good examples, decent repertoire to practice and play, and are a gradual step into playing violin.

I hope you do well on your quest to be a violinist!
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Old 12-13-2012, 06:24 AM   #6 (permalink)
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If you are starting out, I would advise against getting an electric violin to learn on. They tend to make you sound better than you really are. Get to grips with a proper instrument first, learn proper bow technique (which will take years) and then move to an electric once you're a competent player.

I 100% recommend a teacher to help you learn the basics. They are difficult to pick up, and once you have bad habits brought on by teaching yourself, they are extremely difficult to break.

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Old 12-18-2012, 10:11 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Well, I advise to not buy a violin if you are an absolute beginner. Okay violins are really expensive (if you don't want the 100 dollar junk from the wallmart(i don't know if they sell violins there, but I disadvise it anyway)) and you shouldn't invest into a piece of junk like that. If you just started playing, you might change your mind and not like it. Playing the violin is a lot harder, because it requires so much technique, it takes a lot of time to play in a clear way. Of course, you do need a violin, so I advise you to hire one at a violin constructor, who knows what he's doing and will take your preferences into account when giving you one. You can also become a member(as in paying the membershipfee) of the orchestra, they will lend you a violin if you join their orchestra when you are adequate enough and have learned enough to be a part of the string section.
In every case, get a teacher. you can teach piano to yourself, because the technique is easy compared to a string instrument (not easy to play, just the technique).
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Old 12-18-2012, 10:31 AM   #8 (permalink)
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There are many student violins out there which are good enough to be started with, such as Stentor.

When ready to start bowing (after learning to hold the violin, pluck the strings, and start with finger positions, I would actually spend more money on a decent weighted bow, with good hair, as that is often the hardest part to master and the area where cheap items are most detrimental.

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