Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > Artists Corner > Talk Instruments
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-08-2013, 06:46 PM   #11 (permalink)
The Music Guru.
 
Burning Down's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Beyond the Wall
Posts: 4,730
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Larehip View Post
Sure? "Dia-" means "across" to the best of my knowledge. Like diametric--"measure across".
Diatonic = "Across the tones"
For engineers, yeah. But in music education it can be an abbreviation for diatonic. It depends on who your instructors are.
Burning Down is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 08:07 PM   #12 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
anathematized_one's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Someplace Awful
Posts: 123
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Larehip View Post
Sure? "Dia-" means "across" to the best of my knowledge. Like diametric--"measure across".
Diatonic = "Across the tones"

I would also advise the OP to ear train BEFORE delving too deeply into theory and notation or he might get sidetracked. It's important to develop a good ear for music before doing anything else.
Depends on origin.

diatonic (adj.)
c.1600, from French diatonique, from Latin diatonicus, from Greek diatonikos, from diatonos "extending; pertaining to the diatonic scale," from dia- (see dia-) + teinein "to stretch" (see tenet).

In Greek, literally translates as "through the tones" but means, even in original context with DIATONIC, 7-tone scale (that's what they understood as being "through the tones"). Just like schizophrenia literally translates from Greek as "split mind" but that's not the understanding they had of it (they didn't at all believe it to be the mind being split in two or anything like that).
__________________
Sardonicus
YouTube Channel
anathematized_one is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 08:40 PM   #13 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 895
Default

I don't know what the point is that you're making here. I'm saying that "dia-" doesn't mean "seven" but rather "across".
Lord Larehip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 09:08 PM   #14 (permalink)
The Music Guru.
 
Burning Down's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Beyond the Wall
Posts: 4,730
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Larehip View Post
I don't know what the point is that you're making here. I'm saying that "dia-" doesn't mean "seven" but rather "across".
You're arguing semantics here.
Burning Down is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 02:14 AM   #15 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
anathematized_one's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Someplace Awful
Posts: 123
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Larehip View Post
I don't know what the point is that you're making here. I'm saying that "dia-" doesn't mean "seven" but rather "across".
It goes back to Pythagorean mathematics and theory, it means 7. It only means through in Latin contexts and is completely irrelevant, diatonic is ALWAYS a 7 tone scale, so it doesn't matter.

Dia also means "day" in Spanish. So the point I was making is that it is found in many languages and means something different in each. Regardless, to the ancient Greek Pythagoreans, it meant the 7 tone scale, regardless of literal translation.

It is not going to do anything but confuse somebody new to theory, like the OP, to debate a highly irrelevant point.

Sent from my SCH-S720C using Tapatalk 2
__________________
Sardonicus
YouTube Channel
anathematized_one is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 07:51 AM   #16 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 895
Default

Next, you'll be telling me "chromatic" means "12".
Lord Larehip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 08:09 AM   #17 (permalink)
The Music Guru.
 
Burning Down's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Beyond the Wall
Posts: 4,730
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Larehip View Post
Next, you'll be telling me "chromatic" means "12".
I'm not sure why you're so hung up on what these words actually mean. Accept that it's the standard terminology for music theory.
Burning Down is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 08:19 AM   #18 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
anathematized_one's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Someplace Awful
Posts: 123
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Larehip View Post
Next, you'll be telling me "chromatic" means "12".
All right, now you're starting to get really annoying and stupid.

"Dia" as in diatonic from Greek roots means, regardless of literal translation or how much of an arse you want to be, SEVEN tone scale... PERIOD.

End of discussion. I told you the history and where the root comes from for the word diatonic and what it meant to the people who first used it.

And chromatic means "skin-like". So the chromatic scale means all the tones in the ancient Grecian sense.

I know this may be a hard concept for somebody so full of themselves to understand, but some words in other languages translate literally in a way far different than their actual understood meaning.

Now jog on before I get a mod in here.
__________________
Sardonicus
YouTube Channel
anathematized_one is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 08:23 AM   #19 (permalink)
The Music Guru.
 
Burning Down's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Beyond the Wall
Posts: 4,730
Default

I'm already in here haha
Burning Down is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 08:51 AM   #20 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 895
Default

Quote:
And chromatic means "skin-like".
The Greek word "chroma" CAN mean skin but it means color. And the word chromatic as used in music refers to color not to skin. I'll leave it to you to puzzle out why.

And stop telling me that it's irrelevant. It's NOT irrelevant and it's NOT a matter semantics. It's a matter of correct translation--PERIOD! You're either propagating accurate information or you're spouting BS. It can't be both at the same time. It's either right or it's wrong. In your case, it's WRONG.
Lord Larehip is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2020 Advameg, Inc.