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Old 06-12-2013, 03:36 PM   #41 (permalink)
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I did, read my post through and see if you can spot where.
You didn't, of course. I'll explain it for the benefit of people who really want to know, which you've made abundantly clear that you don't so just skip over this part:

An interval being defined as the musical distance between two pitches doesn't explain it adequately and causes many to believe that it is a matter of how many half-steps there are between the two notes.

Half-steps don't matter. We need to know how many note letters we are spanning and the following:

Suppose you want to know what interval B to D represents. First, it spans three letters--BCD so it is a third. But is it major or minor? Let's make the lower note, B, into a B major scale. Does the upper note, D, occur naturally in the B major scale? No. D# occurs naturally in the B major scale. Now let's expand the upper note, D, into a D major scale. Does the lower note, B, occur naturally in the D major scale? Yes. Only F and C are sharped in the D major scale. When the upper note of the interval as a major scale incorporates the lower note in the interval, that interval is ALWAYS minor. Since we are spanning 3 notes, then that interval is a minor 3rd.

Now, let's say the interval is B to D#. Spans three letters so it's a 3rd. Does B major contain a D#? Yes. Does D# major (that is, Eb major) contain a natural B? No. When the lower note of the interval as a major scale incorporates the upper, then the interval is ALWAYS major. In this case, a major 3rd.

Suppose we made the D# into an Eb in the above example--B to Eb. What interval is that? Since it spans 4 letters, it's a 4th. Does Eb major contain a natural B? No. Does B major contain an Eb? No, but it contains a D# which is the enharmonic equivalent of Eb. So it behaves like a major 3rd but it is a 4th and so we call it a diminished 4th.

Suppose we have an interval of B to E. Spans 4 letters again so it is a 4th. Does B major contain an E natural? Yes. Does E major contain a B natural? Yes. When both scales contain each other's notes in the interval, they are ALWAYS perfect. So B to E is a perfect 4th.

So now you see what makes a perfect interval perfect--each scale contains the other's note. Majors and minors are not perfect because only one's scale contains the other's note.

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I'm really not sure why you feel the need to explain all of this just because I defined a scale as a sequence of intervals and told everyone what those intervals were for the two most common scales. You're just repeating what I said in a different (much longer) way.
I simply explained what a scale is which you didn't do it very well at all. This is your explanation of a scale (and I quote): "tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone". ?????

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All of this is true - (in the germanic tradition and those informed specifically by it), but you really need to stop phrasing all of this as if it is immutable fact. Music isn't about knowing the rules so you can abide by them, its about knowing the rules so that you can break them properly.
I'll assume you can actually define proper breakage of the rules with improper. And I have no problem in breaking any rules. How you got that in your head when I said nothing at all about it means you make unwarranted assumptions about people.

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What absolute ****. There's a significant difference between "Based on" and "Coincidentally resembles".
So you know the difference when a system only mimics a mathematical process exactly and when it's actually following it. I hope you've published a
paper on that. Mathematicians would love to see it.

The rest of your post was plodding and spiked with insults and sarcasm betraying a someone who really isn't sure of his position. I really don't care if you think you know everything but don't then invite people to criticize your knowledge if you can't take it.
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Old 06-13-2013, 03:08 AM   #42 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Lord Larehip View Post
I simply explained what a scale is which you didn't do it very well at all. This is your explanation of a scale (and I quote): "tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone". ?????
I got to here and decided you were a ****ing idiot, because if you'd quoted anything relevant you would have quoted

"A grouping of notes separated by specific intervals. (Notes as described above), repeated by octave. This can be any number of notes, for Example Pentatonic being 5, A traditional major or minor would contain 7 notes, a full chromatic scale would contain 12 notes. (A, B flat, B, C, D flat, D, E flat, E, F, G flat, G, and A flat)."


I'm done, enjoy your imagined superiority.
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Old 06-13-2013, 04:09 PM   #43 (permalink)
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I got to here and decided you were a ****ing idiot, because if you'd quoted anything relevant you would have quoted

"A grouping of notes separated by specific intervals. (Notes as described above), repeated by octave. This can be any number of notes,
Ok, let's test that. It can be any number of notes? Ok, how about 1 note? Repeated by octave? How about C0 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10 C11 C12 C13 C14 C15 C16 C17? Is that a scale?

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for Example Pentatonic being 5, A traditional major or minor would contain 7 notes, a full chromatic scale would contain 12 notes. (A, B flat, B, C, D flat, D, E flat, E, F, G flat, G, and A flat)."
These examples contradict your claim that a scale can be any number of notes. These are very specific--5, 7, 12.

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I'm done, enjoy your imagined superiority.
Well, I sincerely hope you are done so I don't have to keep coming back to this thread to correct your balderdash.
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Old 06-13-2013, 04:13 PM   #44 (permalink)
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Wow, I think I've met my match in LordLarehip when it comes to intricate knowledge of music theory.
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Old 06-13-2013, 04:23 PM   #45 (permalink)
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And just what/who we need in the funk & soul forums, someone that knows what they're talking about.
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Old 07-19-2013, 06:09 AM   #46 (permalink)
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Taking a music class for uni in a few weeks, and I have pretty much no clue of music theory. This thread was a little confusing, but I kinda get it.
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