Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > Artists Corner > Talk Instruments
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-08-2014, 03:40 AM   #1 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 7
Default Dumbass question about scales - please help!!

Dear Anyone.

OK, so as a wannabe composer I should be able to answer this already, so laugh and flame away (like the other forums have where I posted this question) but I wouldn't mind a sensible answer...

So generally speaking, if you wanna write something sad you choose a minor key. BUT - every minor key is also a major key (like B major is the same key sig. as G# minor - that's without checking, I think I'm right!)

As the minor and relative major are the same (if not, please say why) how do you differentiate? How do you write something that's using a minor key's sadness when the minor key is also a major key? I KNOW there's gotta be a simple answer to this because people use minor keys all the time for sadness but I've got a complete blind spot on this one and can't find a decent answer! Why don't major keys also sound sad when they're also minor keys?

I think I'll go and hide somewhere till the thousands of people on this website have stopped guffawing too.....

Yours puzzledly

ulrichburke.
ulrichburke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2014, 05:26 AM   #2 (permalink)
I'm back, baby!
 
Trollheart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: In your face
Posts: 22,025
Default

A lot of people here are musicians (not me) so I don't think anyone will laugh.

But you'll probably have better luck posting this here Artists Corner - Music Banter

Best of luck to you! Hope you get your answer.
TH
__________________
Trollheart: Signature-free since April 2018
Trollheart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2014, 10:13 AM   #3 (permalink)
Just Keep Swimming...
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: See signature...
Posts: 5,443
Default

Ummm... I think you need to brush up on what chords are what, then your confusion will magically melt away.

printable guitar chord chart - chordie
__________________
See location...
Plankton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2014, 08:22 PM   #4 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
music_phantom13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 941
Default

They're not the same. A relative minor has the same key signature. They start on different notes. The B Major scale starts on B, G# minor starts on G#. When you compose a song, you usually use some pattern of chords as the basis, that would usually start with the I chord, therefore writing a song in B Major the first would be a B major chord. As a composer you're using the feel of the key you play in, playing B Major starting on the B will have a very different feel/mood than starting on G# and playing through from there. They all relate, modes are the same way when you get there. You're picking the one that has the feel you are looking for and the relatives are useful for switching from major to minor.
music_phantom13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 06:41 PM   #5 (permalink)
Brain Licker
 
Xurtio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,082
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ulrichburke View Post
Dear Anyone.

OK, so as a wannabe composer I should be able to answer this already, so laugh and flame away (like the other forums have where I posted this question) but I wouldn't mind a sensible answer...

So generally speaking, if you wanna write something sad you choose a minor key. BUT - every minor key is also a major key (like B major is the same key sig. as G# minor - that's without checking, I think I'm right!)

As the minor and relative major are the same (if not, please say why) how do you differentiate? How do you write something that's using a minor key's sadness when the minor key is also a major key? I KNOW there's gotta be a simple answer to this because people use minor keys all the time for sadness but I've got a complete blind spot on this one and can't find a decent answer! Why don't major keys also sound sad when they're also minor keys?

I think I'll go and hide somewhere till the thousands of people on this website have stopped guffawing too.....

Yours puzzledly

ulrichburke.
Key signatures are "major scale centric". It's somewhat ambiguous, but you declare your key through "implying the tonic".

So If you want to imply Am, you might start and end with Am, or you may borrow the major fifth (make Em into E) and use a V-i (E-Am) cadence to establish Am as the key, dominant V's tend to do that.

One could also take that key signature (Am as well as C) and imply the note E as their tonic, making it a Phrygian scale now (giving it a latin or metal vibe depending on your emphasis and timbre). There's lots of different way to establish the tonic, but emphasis, cadences, and starting with that note can help.

In fact, if you were to go around each note in the C major scale and treat it as a tonic, you'd cycle through the 7 modes.
__________________
H̓̇̅̉yͤ͏mͬ͂ͧn͑̽̽̌ͪ̑͐͟o̴͊̈́͑̇m͛͌̓ͦ̑aͫ̽ͤ̇n̅̎͐̒ͫ͐c̆ͯͫ̋ ̔̃́eͯ͒rͬͬ̄҉
Xurtio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2014, 03:29 AM   #6 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 18
Default

Every major key isn't a minor key, they just have the same notes in the ditonic scale. Playing a solo in a Am rhythm, then play the exact same solo in C. It'll sound horrible. Same applies vice versa. This is simply the answer.
buntter is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2020 Advameg, Inc.