Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Classical
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-22-2011, 03:39 AM   #1 (permalink)
Juicious Maximus III
 
tore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Scabb Island
Posts: 5,935
Default Get Your Wig On, It's Baroque Week!

Hey musicbanterers and musicbanterins. This week is baroque week here on MB. What is baroque you say? Well, it's a style of classical music, but I'll let Wikipedia explain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Baroque music describes a style of European classical music approximately extending from 1600 to 1750. This era is said to begin in music after the Renaissance and was followed by the Classical era. The word "baroque" came from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning "misshapen pearl", a strikingly fitting characterization of the architecture of this period; later, the name came to be applied also to its music. Baroque music forms a major portion of the classical music canon, being widely studied, performed, and listened to. Composers of the baroque era include Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Alessandro Scarlatti, Antonio Vivaldi, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Arcangelo Corelli, Claudio Monteverdi, Jean-Philippe Rameau and Henry Purcell. The baroque period saw the development of functional tonality. During the period, composers and performers used more elaborate musical ornamentation, made changes in musical notation, and developed new instrumental playing techniques. Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established opera as a musical genre. Many musical terms and concepts from this era are still in use today.
So, let's celebrate these wig-chewing chubby chasers of old!

Here's some Jean-Baptiste Lulle.

__________________
In the age of information, ignorance is a choice.
tore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 06:49 AM   #2 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 936
Default



I quite like this performance, it isn't too quick and light but it doesn't drag out parts of it either.
starrynight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 06:51 AM   #3 (permalink)
The Music Guru.
 
Burning Down's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Beyond the Wall
Posts: 4,730
Default

I love Baroque music, and that was my favourite class in our series of mandatory music history classes.

First up, one of my all time favourite pieces of the period, Arcangelo Corelli's Trio Sonata Op. 3, No. 1



Now for some Baroque flute music. Georg Philip Telemann, Fantasia in d minor. I played this piece last year for my final flute exam, and did very well with it. It's a gorgeous piece written for a beautiful instrument. Nina Perlove, one of my favourite flutists on Youtube, is playing it:



And here's a bunch of other pieces I really enjoy:

Dietrich Buxtehude, Passacaglia in d minor



J. S. Bach, Toccata and Fugue in d minor



Domenico Scarlatti, Sonata for Harpsichord, K. 455



J. S. Bach: Prelude and Fugue No. 3, in c# minor, Well-Tempered Clavier book 1



Antonio Vivaldi, The Four Seasons concertos: Spring (in E major):



Oh my gosh, I could post forever in this topic!
Burning Down is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 05:26 PM   #4 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

I like Vivaldi's music, especially the songs I played as a child taking Suzuki violin, such as this stately and sweet violin concerto, my favorite of all:

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi - Violin Concerto in A minor
Movement 1, beginning at 2:24, is wonderful and great fun to play.
Movement 2 is loneliness...lovely and solemn although a little boring, I thought, when I was 12 years old.
Movement 3 is energetic and engrossing to play, especially at 7:23 - 7:41 in the video--still one of my favorite violin passages.



And here is a painting of the man himself!

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741):


I also like A. Corelli's "La Folia" Violin Sonata in D Minor, as described here in Skaltezon's Baroque thread:
http://www.musicbanter.com/classical...tml#post961580

Arcangelo Corelli "La Folia" Violin Sonata in D Minor, part I:



Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713):
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2011, 09:10 PM   #5 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Zaqarbal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Spain
Posts: 823
Default

Some Hispanic Baroque composers:

* Manuel de Zumaya (Mexico, 1678-1755). These are two examples of his choral music:



* Tomás de Torrejón (Peru, 1644-1728). The Blood of the Rose (1701, first opera of the Americas) and Lamentation:



* Juan Cabanilles (Spain, 1644-1712). These pieces are Tiento lleno of the 2nd tone and Corrente Italiana:




* Lucas Ruiz de Ribayaz (Spain and Peru, 1626-?). Baroque guitar and harp:



To be continued....

__________________
"Lullabies for adults / crossed by the years / carry the flower of disappointment / tattooed in their gloomy melodies."
Zaqarbal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2011, 03:03 AM   #6 (permalink)
Crazyyyyyy Train
 
Celladorina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5,831
Default

Wow this music is fantastic! One of the pieces reminds me of the theme song for the game in Encarta Encyclopedia 98.
Celladorina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2011, 12:38 PM   #7 (permalink)
**** Steve Harvey
 
mannny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: MASS
Posts: 423
Default

One of my favorite composers is Bach, and I have recordings of most of his works. Other than Bach I haven't really delved into the period too much. Some of my favorite Baroque pieces:

Passacaglia in G minor by Handel (transcribed to violin and viola by Johan Halvorsen)

This is just a great video, I love the exchange between Perlman and Zukerman in the beginning. I don't know how they can be that calm before performing something like this.

Sonata in C minor for violin and keyboard by Bach


Fantasia and Fugue in A minor by Bach
__________________
mannny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2011, 12:51 PM   #8 (permalink)
The Music Guru.
 
Burning Down's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Beyond the Wall
Posts: 4,730
Default

Bach is king! The Well-Tempered Clavier (Das Wohltemperierte Klavier) Books I & II has to be my favourite Bach work.





Zaqarbal, thanks for sharing that wonderful music!!
Burning Down is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2011, 11:50 PM   #9 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaqarbal View Post
Some Hispanic Baroque composers:

* Lucas Ruiz de Ribayaz (Spain and Peru, 1626-?). Baroque guitar and harp:

I especially liked Lucas Ruiz de Ribayaz' songs, in particular this wonderfully jaunty Baroque guitar piece you posted!

It sounds very Spanish with all that quick strumming and clapping, and amazingly modern, as if it had been composed yesterday. I also like his use of the violin and different time signatures, which make the song sound fresh and vivacious.

Now I'm looking up more pieces by Lucas Ruiz de Ribayaz, since I liked the two you posted. Here are some others I like:

Lucas Ruiz de Ribayaz - "Chacconas, Harp Consort"
This song sounds so modern! Festive and happy and light, lovely and simple and peppy, this song would work as a contemporary one, I feel. From what I've read, this is one of his songs he composed to illustrate the dance forms common in the Spanish Baroque period:



Lucas Ruiz de Ribayaz - "Paradetas"
I think this may be another one of his compositions intended for dancing since it is so energetic. I think I'd enjoy Spanish dancing very much! I love how this song picks up energy as it goes along right to the end.



* * * * *

Ribayaz' songs with their guitar strumming and simple chord changes remind me of one of my favorite modern songs, which has a Spanish flair, The Damned's cover of "Alone Again Or": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6RqcEuxY_Q
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"

Last edited by VEGANGELICA; 03-27-2011 at 12:01 AM.
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2011, 11:37 AM   #10 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Zaqarbal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Spain
Posts: 823
Default

^ I'm glad you like it. The Hispanic Baroque is very interesting. It has influences from popular music (from both sides of the Atlantic) and Italian composers (through the Kingdom of Naples). And musicians who lived or were born in the Americas found inspiration in the exuberant nature of the continent (all that colourful flora and fauna must be stunning to any sensitive person).

There are many notable composers from this period. These are three important names more:

* Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla (Spain and Mexico, c.1590–1664):




* Gaspar Fernández (Guatemala and Mexico, 1566-1629):



(the second one is a villancico sung in Nahuatl)


* Juan de Araujo
(Peru, 1646–1712):



* And these are two 18th-century anonymous sonatas. From Chiquitos (nowadays in Bolivia) and Mexico, respectively:



__________________
"Lullabies for adults / crossed by the years / carry the flower of disappointment / tattooed in their gloomy melodies."
Zaqarbal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.