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Old 08-04-2010, 09:08 PM   #91 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by SATCHMO View Post
For people new to "classical" music, I think that 20th century European composers are really the way to go. There seems to be a much more engaging vigorous dynamic going on, a lot more minor key "doom & Gloom", especially with the Russians like Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff. I find it to be a lot more accessible than most of the earlier periods

My faves:
Shostakovich
Bartok
Holst
Rachmaninoff
Sibelius
Prokofiev

I don't think you can go wrong with any of those.
I would also add Stravinsky and Mahler to that list. All of those composers are great gateways into the world of orchestral music.

I would also suggest to anyone that is new to classical music to put off listening to the more heavy 20th-century avant-garde stuff, which includes: Arnold Schoenberg, Anton Webern, Harry Partch, John Cage, Eric Satie, Alban Berg (among many others), until they are well versed with the big composers from the Baroque (ie. Bach, Vivaldi), Classical (ie. Beethoven, Mozart), and Romantic periods (ie. Liszt, Berlioz). I say this because the avant-garde stuff might scare off a classical music newbie!
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Old 08-10-2010, 10:57 AM   #92 (permalink)
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It's been a few years since I was playing piano seriously but my favorite composer was always Bach. I had studied with a teacher who studied with Rosalyn Tureck so I was taught a lot of Bach. Other than that I would say that French Impressionism is my favorite period of music.
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Old 08-14-2010, 02:13 PM   #93 (permalink)
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It's been a few years since I was playing piano seriously but my favorite composer was always Bach. I had studied with a teacher who studied with Rosalyn Tureck so I was taught a lot of Bach. Other than that I would say that French Impressionism is my favorite period of music.
My dad feels Bach created the epitome of musical compositions, Pomegrant. He adores Bach! So, I grew up listening to my dad practicing various Bach piano pieces, which aren't so easy to play, are they, since your left hand isn't just providing accompaniment for the right hand!

Since I'm not a proficient piano player, the only Bach song I can sightread and play...but luckily also one of my favorites...is Prelude 1 in C Major:

Spoiler for Bach's Prelude in C Major:
And here is what I WISH I could play, but I just don't think it sounds as nice on the violin!!
Spoiler for Prelude from Bach's Cello Suite #1--Ahhh :) :
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If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
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Old 08-14-2010, 11:26 PM   #94 (permalink)
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My dad feels Bach created the epitome of musical compositions, Pomegrant. He adores Bach! So, I grew up listening to my dad practicing various Bach piano pieces, which aren't so easy to play, are they, since your left hand isn't just providing accompaniment for the right hand!

Since I'm not a proficient piano player, the only Bach song I can sightread and play...but luckily also one of my favorites...is Prelude 1 in C Major:

Spoiler for Bach's Prelude in C Major:
And here is what I WISH I could play, but I just don't think it sounds as nice on the violin!!
Spoiler for Prelude from Bach's Cello Suite #1--Ahhh :) :
I would have to agree with you father. Even in his most simplistic works there is great amounts of depth and complexity which I guess stems from the ornate culture of the baroque period. However I think Bach transcends baroque music and he really did a lot of experimentation with harmonies. I just really admire that he did his music even when his music was going out of fashion.

I'm trying to remember some of my favorite pieces but remember BWV numbers after all of these years isn't too easy. I'll post some videos once I find them.

Cellos are just so much more beautiful than violins.
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Old 08-14-2010, 11:57 PM   #95 (permalink)
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I always enjoyed this fugue a whole lot.




I can't find youtube videos of the Italian Concerto movements that I like but it's a wonderful piece.

I've found some Goldburg vartions though and I suppose everybody likes Glen Gould although my teacher didn't because her teacher apparently was heated rival of Gould. The 70's was just so much cooler for musical feuds.
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Old 08-15-2010, 02:24 AM   #96 (permalink)
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I would have to agree with you father. Even in his most simplistic works there is great amounts of depth and complexity which I guess stems from the ornate culture of the baroque period. However I think Bach transcends baroque music and he really did a lot of experimentation with harmonies. I just really admire that he did his music even when his music was going out of fashion.

I'm trying to remember some of my favorite pieces but remember BWV numbers after all of these years isn't too easy. I'll post some videos once I find them.

Cellos are just so much more beautiful than violins.
My dad says the exact same thing about how wonderful the harmonies are that Bach sets up throughout his music! I am an untutored listener, so I think I appreciate Bach's music much more simplistically than my dad, who was born with perfect pitch and knows all the frequency differences among notes, plus is instantly aware of the chords and different keys used.

I think the one downside to Bach's music is that sometimes the music's intricacy takes over at the expense of the music's emotion. Even my dad agrees with me on this. Some Bach pieces feel rather robotic to me. However, others are painfully beautiful, and those are the ones I prefer.

Yes, cellos are just much warmer and resonant than violins, I agree...although when I play lower notes on the violin I get to imagine I'm playing a cello but high up, so then the violin isn't so bad! And the violin can sound very sweet.

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I suppose everybody likes Glen Gould although my teacher didn't because her teacher apparently was heated rival of Gould. The 70's was just so much cooler for musical feuds.
Thank you for sharing some of your favorite pieces!

The Bach Partita reminds me of the Bach Double we Suzuki violinists always love playing, I think, when we are kids. I remember enjoying it very much. I'm sure you know it, of course, but here it is anyway...and the violins don't sound too shabby!

Bach Double Violin Concerto





I had never heard of Bach's English Suites before last week, when I asked my dad what his current favorite music is and he said he really finds the Allemande portion of English Suite #1 to be lovely. We first listened to Suite #2 by accident (so now, thanks to your post, I've heard it twice), and then to Suite #1. It begins at 2:57 in this video, which I like because the pianist plays the piece more slowly than in some other recording I heard that was of Glenn Gould, actually!:

Bach - English Suite #1



I looked up both your teacher's teacher, Rosalyn Tureck, and Glen Gould to learn more about their rivalry. Wikipedia says, "In a CBC radio special on Glenn Gould, the host told Tureck that Gould cited her as his 'only' influence. She responded by saying she knew that she was an influence, and that it was very kind of him to say so." The rivalry perhaps shows up in her phrasing when she says she knows she was an influence! It's too bad...both are deceased now, I see.
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Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"

Last edited by VEGANGELICA; 08-15-2010 at 02:30 AM.
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Old 08-16-2010, 01:41 AM   #97 (permalink)
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My top 5:

Beethoven
Sibelius
Debussy
*gasp* Verdi (I generally love operas though , Wagner & Mozart - Runners up!)
Bach

And my top 5 works would be:

1. Debussy - La Mer
2. Verdi - La Traviata
3. Sibelius - En Saga
4. Bach - Goldberg Variations
5. Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 21 in C major (Waldstein)
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Old 08-17-2010, 11:12 PM   #98 (permalink)
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And my top 5 works would be:

1. Debussy - La Mer
2. Verdi - La Traviata
3. Sibelius - En Saga
4. Bach - Goldberg Variations
5. Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 21 in C major (Waldstein)
I'd never heard Bach's Goldberg Variations before Pomegrant posted a video (above), and now I'm listening to all 30 to appreciate them more.

I like the way Bach constrains himself to be creative within certain limitations he decides upon. For example, I read that in the Goldberg Variations, "after a statement of the aria at the beginning of the piece...the variations do not follow the melody of the aria, but rather use its bass line and chord progression." Goldberg Variations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I never thought of just using the chord progression or bass line to form musical variations of a theme, instead of just doing simpler variations of the melody! Listening to the Goldberg Variations, I wouldn't have realized this is what is going on unless I had read about it.
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If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
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Old 08-23-2010, 08:42 PM   #99 (permalink)
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My piano teacher at my school is considering having our class of 10 as a collective play the Goldberg variations for our winter recital, with 3 variations a piece.
I hope to god he doesn't do it, I hate playing Bach, and Gould's rendition of them has scared me out of my wits.
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Old 12-31-2010, 11:26 AM   #100 (permalink)
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My top 5 classical composers are:

- Pyotr Tchaikovsky(1840 – 1893)
- Ludwig van Beethoven(1770-1827)
- Johann Sebastian Bach
- Sir Edward Elgar(1857 - 1934)
- Antonín Dvorak(1841 – 1904)
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