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Old 02-20-2009, 12:42 PM   #61 (permalink)
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Wild Wood is a great record, as are Heavy Soul and Stanley Road. When I was a teenager I got a hold of Wellers greatest hits, the 2 disc issue with the live disc and played it to death.

I really loved The Corals record too. That was the only one I ever heard though, i got a little bored by them after that.

I'm thinking we listened to a lot of the same kind of stuff back then ie mid to late 90's and early 00's.
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Old 02-20-2009, 02:15 PM   #62 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojopinuk View Post
Wild Wood is a great record, as are Heavy Soul and Stanley Road. When I was a teenager I got a hold of Wellers greatest hits, the 2 disc issue with the live disc and played it to death.

I really loved The Corals record too. That was the only one I ever heard though, i got a little bored by them after that.

I'm thinking we listened to a lot of the same kind of stuff back then ie mid to late 90's and early 00's.
It's looking that way ain't it? As for the Coral, the followup to the aforementioned album has its moments, but there are some pretty boring songs on it. It was just downhill from there on for them.

By the way, can't really be bothered to do the next batch tonight. I'll post eight albums tomorrow to make up for it though.
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Old 02-21-2009, 10:13 AM   #63 (permalink)
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Right, where were we...

68. The Celibate Rifles - Sideroxylon (1983)

Another example of the cream of the crop when it comes to Australian punk, the lads from Sydney (who's name is actually a reversal of the Sex Pistols - took me years to spot that one) have probably been the most consistent with their efforts too. The debut here is the one I'd put above the others though. Strutting, hard rocking tunes, disenchanted lyrics, consistent in its quality, it's one of the overlooked punk classics.
The best bits: Killing Time, Tick Tock, God Squad

67. Cibelle - Cibelle (2003)

This one's a bit hard to classify really. I've heard of her being called 'tropical punk', but that's pretty wide of the mark. I'd say she's something like a Brazilian incarnation of Bjork, and definitely my favourite singer-songwriter to emerge from Brazil. Both of her albums are worthwhile, but her debut makes for the best starting point, serving as something of a manifesto of her music to come, which seems to me like a cross between alternative folk and tropicalia.
The best bits: S'o Sei Viver No Samba, Lusias, Train

66. The Birthday Party - Junkyard (1982)

What kind of albums list would be complete without this? Having been a Nick Cave fan for quite a while, it's more or less a given for me as well. To some people I know it's just a cacophony of people yelling, thumping and twanging things. To me it's (of course) a work of art. Angry, totally nuts, abrasive, and about as left-of-field as a lot of music got in those days. I used to love pissing my flatmates in Scotland off with this. For those who haven't heard it, the album cover should give you a good idea of what it all sounds like.
The best bits: The Dim Locator, Big-Jesus-Trash-Can, Release the Bats

65. Lou Reed - Berlin (1973)

Lou Reed's finest album here, without a doubt (Transformer's good, if slightly overrated in my eyes/ears). It's also a nice and ambitious rock opera about a doomed, drug-addled couple, and features beautifully dark and depressing rock-related soundscapes to compliment it. I'm no fan of his later so, barring his efforts with the Velvets, this is his best piece of work.
The best bits: Caroline Says 1, the Kids, Sad Song
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Old 02-22-2009, 01:44 PM   #64 (permalink)
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64. Dub Incorporation - Diversité (2003)

A massively interesting, genre-hopping album which contains shades of dub (oddly enough), dancehall, ska and ragga, culminating in one of the essential modern reggae albums. Wonderful production, intense rhythms, fairly accessible even to non-reggae fans (by my reckonin) - it just glows with passion and energy.
The best bits: Rudeboy, Murderer, L'échiquier

63. Iggy Pop - The Idiot (1977)

It's the story I'm sure a lot of us have heard before - Iggy Pop and David Bowie exiling themselves to Berlin to kick their respective drug habits and make some of the greatest music of all time. With Bowie in the producer's chair, Iggy went about making a grim and moody album of dark proto-punk (I suppose you could call it that anyway) in the same sort of (note, sort of) area as Pere Ubu. In my opinion it's his masterpiece (although Lust For Life and Raw Power give it a run for its money).
The best bits: China Girl, Tiny Girls, Mass Production

62. Aztec Camera - High Land, Hard Rain (1983)

The debut effort from Glasgow's favourite new wave/pop-rock band, it's an album with a very warm and friendly vibe about it. It's probably the album I'd recommend most from the Scottish post-punk scene of the early 80s (and with such contemporaries as Josef K and the Fire Engines, that takes some doing). Whether you're a fan or not, whether you'd want to investigate their later work or not, this album is a flat-out must-have. Also, in the shape of We Could Send Letters it boasts one of the best singles of the 80s.
The best bits: The Bugle Sounds Again, We Could Send Letters, Haywire

61. Joe Jackson - Night and Day (1982)

Being something of an Elvis Costello fanboy as I am, it was only a matter of time before I got tuned in to the delights of Joe Jackson's music, both of them being hot contenders for the title of Britain's reigning Angry Young Man. Another singer-songwriter of the Tin Pan Alley tradition, Jackson used this album as an indicator to the music industry that he was a serious songwriter, this ambitious effort taking the new wave sound he'd been renowned for a few steps further, adding jazzy flourishes and chamber pop-isms into the mix. It's a sleek, bright and adventurous record, and a great starting point for anyone looking to get into the guy.
The best bits: Chinatown, Steppin' Out, Cancer
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Old 02-22-2009, 01:47 PM   #65 (permalink)
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Dub Incorporation You need to get into some Le Peuple De l'herbe mate.
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Old 02-22-2009, 01:55 PM   #66 (permalink)
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Dub Incorporation You need to get into some Le Peuple De l'herbe mate.
Definitely. I've loved what I've heard of them so far. Any albums you'd particularly recommend?
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Old 02-22-2009, 02:02 PM   #67 (permalink)
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Triple Zero is probably my favourite. Here's my thread:

http://www.musicbanter.com/electroni...de-lherbe.html
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Old 02-22-2009, 02:06 PM   #68 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Triple Zero is probably my favourite. Here's my thread:

http://www.musicbanter.com/electroni...de-lherbe.html
Ah, good good. I'll have a go at that comp sharpish - cheers muchly
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:48 PM   #69 (permalink)
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best run of albums so far I think, Joe Jackson is/was the proverbial bollocks

You're right about Aztec Camera, they are much more poppy than the other postcard bands but i've always got time for Josef K etc, you should check out Orange Juice pronto!
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Old 02-23-2009, 07:35 AM   #70 (permalink)
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Quote:
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You're right about Aztec Camera, they are much more poppy than the other postcard bands but i've always got time for Josef K etc, you should check out Orange Juice pronto!
I love me a bit of Josef K as well, I'm just a little more inclined towards the pop melodies of Aztec Camera really. As for Orange Juice, I'm planning another downloading spree in the near future, so I'll probably get some of their stuff too.

Mixtape #4's on the way, as soon as I get the next bunch of albums out the way.

60. Turin Brakes - Jackinabox (2005)

To tell you truth, any of their first three albums are worthwhile, but when I got Jackinabox it came with a limited edition bonus DVD, which made the experience more complete. That and the fact this one packs their best single justify its spot here. Having started as a Simon and Garfunkel-esque acoustic folk duo, this album finds them moving into more of a mainstream, electric territory, adding a little bit of their country influences into the mix, and in general serves as a great middle-ground between modern acoustic and electric rock. A gentle, easygoing and melodious piece of work.
The best bits: Fishing For a Dream, Buildings Wrap Around Me, Jackinabox

59. The New Christs - Distemper (1989)

Founded by Rob Younger, former singer for the massively influential Australian punk rockers Radio Birdman, his first album release with the New Christs is another one of the very best punk albums of the scene. Admittedly, they don't sound that dissimilar to Radio Birdman; they're still the same kind of pissed off, hard-rocking crew, but Distemper is a lot more consistent an album than either of the former's LP releases. Another vital part of any punk library (for want of a better phrase)
The best bits: No Way On Earth, Burning Of Rome, Bed Of Nails

58. George Harrison - All Things Must Pass (1970)

Another pretty obvious choice here. A lot's been said about this album, and it's not like any of you don't know who the guy is, so I'll keep this brief. One of the most uplifting albums ever. The lyrics may be a bit preachy in places, but the production and musicianship on show allow such things to be stuck on the back burner.
The best bits: If Not For You, All Things Must Pass, Art Of Dying

57. Funkadelic - One Nation Under a Groove (1978)

Again, a bit on the obvious side, so I'll keep this short and sweet. I haven't got as much of the funky stuff as I'd like in the old music library, but this is probably my favourite such album. Uplifting, danceable, a little bit f*cked in places, it's the obvious album to start with if you're yet to get into some funk.
The best bits: Who Says a Funk Band Can't Play Rock?!, Promental****backwashpsychosis Enema Squad, Cholly (Funk Getting Ready To Roll)
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