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Old 01-29-2011, 07:04 PM   #31 (permalink)
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Ok so he's Spanish. Close...
Since when has Spanish not been Latin...... Those are some interesting (and pretty diverse) examples though, Andres Sergovia is pretty good. A couple of my favorite Brazilian albums:

A Tábua de Esmeralda - Jorge Ben

Two things really stand out in this album for me. One, Jorge Ben's voice. It's all over the map: high, low, manic, depressed, etc. If anything, the one thing that's consistent throughout is its uniqueness. Second, is his incorporation of samba sounds with rock, and more importantly, funk. The sound that Jorge Ben helped to invent along with other notable Brazilian musicians out of the Tropicalia movement was in reality another Bossa Nova, a movement that built upon the old sounds of samba within the framework of a different decade: the late 60s and 70s. With that being said, there are also elements of psychedelic influences, including experimentation with more complex instrumentation that was fairly common (sometimes unfortunately) among artists of this part of the decade. On some tracks you can even find musical and lyrical nods to Ben's historic African roots, not surprising considering two years later he would release an album titled Africa Brasil.

Cinco Minutos:





Acabou Chorare - Novos Baianos

According to Rolling Stone, this is the best album ever produced in Brazil. While that position might be debatable, it's significance and overall quality shouldn't be. This album's foundation, like A Tábua..., is samba. Throughout the album you can hear the cavaquinho, a small ukelele like guitar often used in Samba. The percussion also borrows significantly from its Samba roots. The difference between this album, however, and A Tábua... is that Acabou Chorare fuses its Samba foundation with a different sound: hard rock with more clearly psychedelic elements. The most interesting track is "Mistério do Planeta" which in a way represents the musical progression found in the album. Starting off with a simple samba-esque guitar line, the song eventually progresses to an electric guitar riff that sounds much more early 70s. The album itself was produced in 1972.

Mistério do Planeta:
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Old 01-30-2011, 08:32 AM   #32 (permalink)
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Since when has Spanish not been Latin...... Those are some interesting (and pretty diverse) examples though, Andres Sergovia is pretty good.
Appreciated; I thought it was an interesting range as well. I laughed out loud, actually.

Enjoying the range of all the work. That's whats great about the themed weeks.

And some new ideas while I was working!
Well, one great one I missed.







What a duo these two make. They beat their hands UP on those strings. I do love their work, but it takes a little bit of an occasion to bring them out... and I don't know why. I'm glad I had a chance to listen to them today, because of this thread.
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Old 01-30-2011, 09:36 AM   #33 (permalink)
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Wow ! You guys really know your way around Latin music.

I enjoyed your Mexican Institute of Sound and Mattias clips, Mrd00d, for their very original take on cumbia and la Bamba, but for repeated listening, I think I`d go back to the beautiful Sergovia song more often.

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Do the younger generations listen to Ranchero music in Mexico? In LA it's usually always middle-aged men, I don't know if that's just an influence of American culture though. It's a shame how native U.S. citizens really frown upon Ranchero music. Just because you don't like it/it's foreign doesn't mean it should be mocked constantly.
I`m no real fan of Ranchero as such, and most Mexican kids treat it as a joke: it`s over-exposed in the local media and turns up in the soundtrack of too many cheesy old Mexican movies. I think Shakira, Mana or Enrique Iglesias are about as Latin as most young people want to go; cumbia,samba,bossa nova, etc are strictly for the grandmothers and housemaids.

The gradual developement in your Novos Baianos clip is excellent, BTW and your Jorge Ben recommendation reminds me that I`ve got a track of his on a sampler album I`ve hardly ever played, so I`ve got some listening to do.

And there`s Mrd00d with another post - slow down, you guys !
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Old 01-31-2011, 12:56 AM   #34 (permalink)
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The gradual developement in your Novos Baianos clip is excellent, BTW and your Jorge Ben recommendation reminds me that I`ve got a track of his on a sampler album I`ve hardly ever played, so I`ve got some listening to do.
Yeah, I love Jorge Ben. Just out of curiosity, what song is it on your sampler? This is another pretty well-known Jorge Ben song, which makes sense because it is very, very catchy:



A very cool song I think.
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:12 AM   #35 (permalink)
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This has to be one of the catchiest guitar riffs ever..I really cant hear a heavy dose of latin style in this particular song. Just enough that I can still manage to listen to it all the way through. Still a great song that I had forgot about until I saw this thread.
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Old 01-31-2011, 03:22 PM   #36 (permalink)
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Ah, it's over. Well...

Carlos Santana never got mentioned.

Carlos Santana.





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Old 01-31-2011, 03:25 PM   #37 (permalink)
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yeah I'm surprised he didn't get mentioned and I should have also mentioned him as much as I listen to his material.
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Old 01-31-2011, 05:32 PM   #38 (permalink)
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The expression "Latin music" seems to be too vague. I use to say, as a joke, that I imagine Julius Caesar playing the electric guitar, Cicero rocking the bass and Octavian at the drums.

Well, if we take it as a mere linguistic classification, it would be too broad, and it should include Italian and French-language music too. So, as Tore said:

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(...) what I suggest is that we use this week to simply celebrate what we think of as latin flavoured music which we enjoy, whatever genre might better describe it.

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There's a lot of Latin folk that's really under-appreciated in my opinion.
I agree. I mentioned the great tradition of folk singer-songwriters at the Spanish-language music thread. I especially like Víctor Jara from Chile.


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Can not forget Segovia...
Yes, Andrés Segovia was a wonderful guitarist. BTW, Asturias was originally composed for piano by Isaac Albéniz (see MB thread). Albéniz's works have many influences from traditional Spanish music.

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Ok so he's Spanish. Close...
Yes, from the second most important province of the Roman Empire. Therefore, Latin. Anyway, there are a lot of mutual musical influences between the two sides of the Atlantic. For instance:

Cantes de ida y vuelta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So nowadays many Spanish-speaking artists play music in a wide range of styles, from diverse origins. One of the most versatile musicians is Federico Aubele. He's from Argentina and lives in Spain. And he's able to make music with an amazing synthesis of styles:



As you can hear, he has incorporated the influences from both Argentinian (tango) and Spanish popular music.


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And people should start posting their thoughts on Brazilian music. There's a lot of amazing stuff happening there.
Of course!! Brazil has a huge musical production. For the moment I've only heard a small percent of it, but I know some big names. Just to begin with, Tom Jobim. Great composer. Absolutely essential:



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Old 01-31-2011, 06:18 PM   #39 (permalink)
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I love that song! Way too under-listened in the U.S. though, people only really think of Girl from Ipanema when they hear Bossa Nova and it's a shame, considering Jobim did so many other good songs. I once went to an anniversary concert in honor of Jobim and saw Gal Costa, Oscar Castro Neves among others perform all his great hits. It was a pretty amazing show.

Just to completely change it up a little bit, another 'Latin' artist that I've been getting into lately is El Guincho. I know this song and music video is the source of a lot of his popularity outside of Spain:

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Old 01-31-2011, 06:35 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Just to completely change it up a little bit, another 'Latin' artist that I've been getting into lately is El Guincho. I know this song and music video is the source of a lot of his popularity outside of Spain:

I was definitely a fan of that video, mostly for the boobies I must admit.
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