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Old 10-14-2008, 03:34 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default The Official Musicbanter Guide To British Slang.

I searched and found a slightly related thread but as it was three years old, I thought I would start afresh.

British people use slang. It is mainly, complete and utter laziness on our part. A means of making a longer sentence shorter and to the point. It is also a marker for the many dialects within Britain and their many choices of words for the same things E.G chewing gum can also be chuddy.

I, myself have used slang on a few occasions completely oblivious to the fact that this site is predominantly North American and therefore it looks like I am speaking in riddles. Or In English: talking a load of old bollocks.

So as half of the moderators are British (it's only a matter of time until we have you all), you may be nonplussed when we all start chewing the fat (Chat).

Post anything in here that you are not familiar with and we will interpret it for you

BTW using slang is atrocious and lazy on a forum, so please accept my apologies.
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Old 10-14-2008, 04:03 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Here's some Manc chat to get the ball rolling;

Skennin = looking at
Do one = go away
Moochin' = walking around
Sidein'= tidying up
Tunin' in = beating someone up
Safe = good
Well safe = very good
Mint = excellent
Buzzin' = excited/high on drugs
Scoop = a beer
Dibble/5-'0' (as in; five-oh) = the Police
Napper - head
Melon = brain
Lamp/one arra/spark out - to render someone unconscious with one blow
Mitherin' (pronounced; mythurrin.) = to bother/annoy.
Panhead/spanner = someone thick
Give it the shoes/leg it = to run away

example;

I was moochin' round town the other day, when I saw this panhead skennin' me.
I told him to do one, but he wouldn't stop skennin'.
He was really doing me melon in...looked like he'd had a few scoops or buzzin' off his napper, so I tuned him in and sparked him right out with one arra.
Right then the Dibble showed up mitherin' so I give it the shoes and legged it.
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Old 10-14-2008, 04:15 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Oh my...that was hard to read. But I do feel enlightened now (I think).
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Old 10-14-2008, 04:15 PM   #4 (permalink)
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A couple of those even I did'nt know.

Our kid's got a bob on himself but most of us just thinks he's half soaked= my brother thinks a lot of himself but we all just think he's stupid. (Midland's talk)
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Old 10-14-2008, 04:23 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Look what I just found...Sound! Learn Mancunian in ten minutes » Mancubist: Life is good in Manchester
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Old 10-14-2008, 05:31 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by right-track View Post
Here's some Manc chat to get the ball rolling;

Skennin = looking at
Do one = go away
Moochin' = walking around
Sidein'= tidying up
Tunin' in = beating someone up
Safe = good
Well safe = very good
Mint = excellent
Buzzin' = excited/high on drugs
Scoop = a beer
Dibble/5-'0' (as in; five-oh) = the Police
Napper - head
Melon = brain
Lamp/one arra/spark out - to render someone unconscious with one blow
Mitherin' (pronounced; mythurrin.) = to bother/annoy.
Panhead/spanner = someone thick
Give it the shoes/leg it = to run away

example;

I was moochin' round town the other day, when I saw this panhead skennin' me.
I told him to do one, but he wouldn't stop skennin'.
He was really doing me melon in...looked like he'd had a few scoops or buzzin' off his napper, so I tuned him in and sparked him right out with one arra.
Right then the Dibble showed up mitherin' so I give it the shoes and legged it.
Pure awesome.
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Old 10-14-2008, 07:19 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by right-track View Post
Here's some Manc chat to get the ball rolling;

Skennin = looking at
Do one = go away
Moochin' = walking around
Sidein'= tidying up
Tunin' in = beating someone up
Safe = good
Well safe = very good
Mint = excellent
Buzzin' = excited/high on drugs
Scoop = a beer
Dibble/5-'0' (as in; five-oh) = the Police
Napper - head
Melon = brain
Lamp/one arra/spark out - to render someone unconscious with one blow
Mitherin' (pronounced; mythurrin.) = to bother/annoy.
Panhead/spanner = someone thick
Give it the shoes/leg it = to run away
I've heard these ones before. Mint/buzzing are quite popular in NZ. Also, we have a phrase 'gap it' (Auckland slang I think) meaning to flee a scene/situation or just go on a bit of a vacation or trip away from it all - similar to leg it methinks.
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Old 10-15-2008, 01:15 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Welsh slang is truly an affront to the English Language. Here are just a few examples.

Nana/mamgu - Grandmother
Tara - Bye
biwt - Short for beautiful
Buttie/butt - Mate/friend
Mun - A kind of swear word... used in frustrating events
cwch - hug
Who's coat is that jacket? - I think that's my coat you're wearing
Lush - Good
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Old 10-17-2008, 05:54 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seltzer View Post
I've heard these ones before. Mint/buzzing are quite popular in NZ. Also, we have a phrase 'gap it' (Auckland slang I think) meaning to flee a scene/situation or just go on a bit of a vacation or trip away from it all - similar to leg it methinks.
'Gap it's' nation wide.

how about durry = cigarette
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Old 10-17-2008, 07:21 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheese View Post
'Gap it's' nation wide.

how about durry = cigarette
Hmmm haven't heard of durry before, but I guess that's because I don't smoke.

I hadn't heard of 'gapping it' until I left Whangarei for Auckland, but then again, I think most Aucklanders haven't heard of 'skux'.
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