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Old 01-14-2009, 08:01 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Do you have any up's for some of these albums? I have been meaning to check out Os Mutantes for ages and The Sonics i'm definitely interested in.
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Old 01-20-2009, 06:17 AM   #32 (permalink)
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Syd Barrett - The Madcap Laughs
(1970)



Tracks

1. Terrapin 5:04
2. No Good Trying 3:26
3. Love You 2:29
4. No Man's Land 3:03
5. Dark Globe 2:02
6. Here I Go 3:10
7. Octopus 3:47
8. Golden Hair 1:59
9. Long Gone 2:50
10. She Took A Long Cold Look 1:55
11. Feel 2:17
12. If It's In You 2:26
13. Late Night 3:10


Syd Barrett left Pink Floyd in 1968; his final contribution to Pink Floyd was the last song on "A Saucerful of Secrets", the very apt Jugband Blues. From here he left to focus on a solo career, whether he left of his own accord or was pushed we can leave for another day, but it took a further two years for Barrett's first solo outing to be released.

"The Madcap Laughs", released in 1970 on Harvest, was two years in the making and had production assistance from various people most notably Roger Waters and Dave Gilmore, as well as session musicians of some esteem to perform overdubs on most of the tracks, musicians including Jerry Shirley of Humble Pie on Drums. It's also worth noting that some of these esteemed musicians never actually met Barrett.

The various sessions involved in writing and recording the songs for this release were dogged with Barrett's internal and well documented mental turmoil, but this record was recorded in the end and what a record it is. The album opens with "Terrapin", despite the number of producers involved throughout the album; this opening track echoes the style, which will make Madcap Laughs the album it is.



Every strum is heard, the lyrics are quite mysterious, the vocals are eerie and because the overdubs are done after and away from Barrett's erratic musicianship, the beats and bars are quite unpredictable, which I happen to believe is a good thing. This trend, which I like to think of as classic Barrett recording techniques, continues with "No Good Trying", the marvellous "Octopus", "Golden Hair" and the beautifully composed "She Took a Long Cold Look" and "Dark Globe".

The album does have some upbeat moments, "Love You" and "Here I Go" are probably as close to pop songs Barrett ever got, but thankfully he's still a million miles off the norm.

Along with "Barrett", another album from Syd Barrett released in 1970, The Madcap Laughs remains a beacon of the talents of this great songwriter, a man whose demons would tragically halt his career but thankfully did not result in this record never being released. Yes, some of the vocals are erratic and sometimes off key, yes some of the songs go off on one a bit with the overdubs trying to keep up, and yes this album is far from being polished, but don't let that stop you, the sum of all the parts of this album make for an unbelievably addictive and surprisingly wholesome record.
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Old 01-20-2009, 06:23 AM   #33 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackhammer View Post
Do you have any up's for some of these albums? I have been meaning to check out Os Mutantes for ages and The Sonics i'm definitely interested in.
I'm afraid not Jack,

I'm not down with the kids when it comes to uploads, and have issues (probably linked to an OCD ) where I must have the physical record scattered around my abode.
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Old 01-20-2009, 12:36 PM   #34 (permalink)
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Nice review of Madcap Laughs. I reviewed it myself for my Pink Floyd thread and was interesting comparing the two. As for the up's no worries. We will convert in the ways of the upload
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Old 01-25-2009, 04:22 PM   #35 (permalink)
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Scott Walker - Scott
(1967)



Tracks

1 Mathilde 2:39
2 Montague Terrace (In Blue) 3:31
3 Angelica 4:02
4 The Lady Came from Baltimore 1:59
5 When Joanna Loved Me 3:08
6 My Death 4:57
7 The Big Hurt 2:26
8 Such a Small Love 4:55
9 You're Gonna Hear from Me 2:53
10 Through a Long and Sleepless Night 4:12
11 Always Coming Back to You 2:41
12 Amsterdam 3:04


Born Scott Engel, in Hamilton, Ohio in 1943, Scott Walker rose to fame in the United Kingdom in the mid sixties as a member of The Walker Brothers, taking the self exiled American band back to the US to conquer the world for one brief moment.

In 1967 however, The Walker Brothers were no more, with all three members going their separate ways to forge solo careers. Scott Walker in the same year released his debut; Scott on the Fontana Record Label. It was deliberately as far removed from a Walker Brother pop idol album as you could get.

As it turns out Scott was the beginnings of a very successful, yet equally surprising solo career. This first album was the blue print for the next three albums, all sharing similar characteristics, which on paper were not really of your typical late sixties fare. A unique blend of Orchestral arrangements, humorous and dark lyrics all glazed over in an almost crooner like varnish, which in 1967 Britain just lapped up, with the album being a surprise Autumn hit.



Contained on this album are songs penned by Walker, as well as some fantastic covers including songs written by his favourite writer, Jacques Brel. The best Brel compositions and strongest song on the album as it happens, is the opening track; Mathilde, it is almost hilarious in its drama and its onslaught like qualities, yet it's a compelling listen and is instantly Scott Walker.

Following the opening track, there are ten beautifully orchestrated numbers, with Walker on top crooner form, Montague Terrace (in Blue) and Angelica are stunningly marvellous songs, an enhanced cover of Tim Hardin's The Lady Came From Baltimore continues the momentum that ultimately takes this album into Classic territory.

By the time you get to the final track, also penned by Brel, Amsterdam, nothing really surprises you anymore, although the track is such a dark and desperate tale, it is yet again so beautifully performed by Walker, it just works and is not at all out of place.

This album was the rebirth and reinvention of a man who had already achieved a great deal in such a short space of time. This album and the following three also ensured that Scott Walker would gain a cult audience and going off this debut album, it isn't difficult to see why.
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Old 01-26-2009, 05:37 AM   #36 (permalink)
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There's a ridiculous amount of albums I need off this thread - only yesterday I drew up a list of albums to download that's literally as long as my arm and just realised there's nothing from the 60s on it.

Os Mutantes, the Madcap Laughs and Are You Experienced are a few I've heard of. Scott Walker's an artist I've been meaning to investigate beyond his later work from Nite Flights through to the Drift (all of which are terrific albums if you don't already have them).

Great reviews, keep them coming.
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Old 01-28-2009, 03:10 PM   #37 (permalink)
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Here's something new for this journal,

When I first went to our resident Mancunian mod with the idea of this journal, I did say that I would also find time to mention the youth of the Republic, and the fine bands that can be found in Mancunia that fit the 1960's remit.

This interview and video was done awhile ago, its when I was young and first started out on a solo media career, so please excuse the "errrrrs" and the media whoring.

The point of this video is to highlight the marvellous Salford Garage Blues band, "Hard Luck Child". They're quite unique for the Manchester scene, with routes firmly based in the content of this journal.

With music that sounds like it was recorded in a dustbin (the way it should sound by the way ), they're an exciting band who I'm sure will go far.

Anyways, to have a listen to their blues ridden stuff, it can be found at
Hard Luck Child on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads

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Old 01-28-2009, 03:14 PM   #38 (permalink)
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The Sonics - Here Are The Sonics
(1965)



Tracks

1 The Witch 2:40
2 Do You Love Me 2:18
3 Roll Over Beethoven 2:49
4 Boss Hoss 2:24
5 Dirty Robber 2:02
6 Have Love, Will Travel 2:40
7 Psycho 2:17
8 Money 2:00
9 Walkin' the Dog 2:45
10 Night Time Is the Right Time 2:58
11 Strychnine 2:13
12 Good Golly Miss Molly 2:08


If you ever wanted to know what a ton of dynamite would sound like if you lit the fuse and gave it some microphones, guitars, drums and a saxophone, then listen no further. Here it is ladies and gentlemen, 100% unfiltered TNT, all the way from Tacoma, in America's northwest, Here Are The Sonics.

Here Are The Sonics is the debut from the brilliant Sonics, released on The Norton Record Label in 1965, the album was a commercial flop proving once and for all that the mass record buying public then, like today, are a pretty foolish bunch. But hopefully you have your head screwed on and will no doubt love this album after one listen or even half a listen.



Other then the health risks, what really is there not to like about this album?

Highlights on the album are many and involve either a riff sent from the bowels of the earth, a series of beats crashing down from Mount Olympus or a scream that can kill Santa Claus and ultimately probably did, most likely though it is a combination of all three of these factors in the same song. Psycho, The Witch, Strychnine, Keep A Knockin', Boss Hoss, Have Love Will Travel, Dirty Robber, it is all happening with this album, seriously these songs are some of the finest to come out of America, let alone the 1960's, and The Sonics have been genius enough to have created all these great songs in time for their debut album.

Here Are The Sonics in short is one of the ultimate Sixties Garage albums, containing pure grit, as live as it is raw and containing filthy raunch that would make a nun faint, a landmark American album, one of the great debuts, and very much under appreciated by the mass consumer, that's about it really



The Sonics - Boom
(1966)



Tracks

1 Cinderella 2:44
2 Don't Be Afraid of the Dark 2:22
3 Skinny Minnie 2:11
4 Let the Good Times Roll 2:00
5 Don't You Just Know It 2:49
6 Jenny, Jenny 2:19
7 He's Waitin' 2:32
8 Louie, Louie 3:00
9 Since I Fell for You 3:59
10 Hitch Hike 2:45
11 It's All Right 2:10
12 Shot Down 2:08


One of two landmark albums released by Tacoma, Washington's very own, The Sonics. In 1966, The Sonics released the follow up to their triumphant yet largely forgotten debut, "Here Are The Sonics"; "Boom" was just as harsh, just as raw and just as electric as that marvellous release from 1965.

"Boom", released on the Norton Record Label was the last great album from this very much-underrated act. Charting nowhere in 1966 and offering very little in mass consumer appeal, the album forced The Sonics to reassess their sound and focus, as a result this left any follow up albums sadly lacking that little extra bite, making Boom even the more important.

"Boom" is classic Sonics, gritty, electric and pure unadulterated filth, which is all you can ask for from a band who made it their business to turn it up and smack you right between the ears with the equivalent of a bag of spanners.



The album starts with "Cinderella", brace yourself folks, this is proper rock n roll and could scorch the brain, be warned that track 7 "He's Waitin'" has similar health damaging qualities.

Moving to track two we have "Don't Be Afraid of The Dark", which starts off (well first 10 seconds) seemingly all nice and gentle, but then again this is Gerry Roslie on lead vocals so don't get too snug. Roslie's vocals are very strong on this album; for example his vocals on "Jenny Jenny", are by no means overshadowed by the Little Richard original. It's a shame that this man's talents weren't more widely recognised at the time.

Another powerful cover from The Sonics can be found on "Boom", "Louie Louie" I think sums The Sonics up perfectly, taking a simple idea and injecting it with napalm and making it unbelievably dirty and explosive. A formula, which started in 1965 and very much continued with this 1966 release.

From start to finish this second album from The Sonics is a real treat, so hunt it down.
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Old 01-29-2009, 04:39 AM   #39 (permalink)
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Totally missed this journal Cellartapes.. looks sweet! I'm creeping up to mid-20's aswell and I also love the 60's, don't worry our time will come sir

Do you have Mass in F Minor by the Prunes? It's mental. I intend to check out Turquoise!
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Old 02-01-2009, 04:46 PM   #40 (permalink)
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The Sundowners - Captain Nemo
(1968)



Tracks

1 Sunny Day People 2:36
2 Edge of Love 3:10
3 Let It Be Me 4:36
4 Dear Undecided 2:24
5 Ring Out Wild Bells 2:27
6 Plaster Casters 2:43
7 Captain Nemo 3:45
8 Always You 2:54
9 Easy Does It 2:48
10 Blue-Green Eyes 3:03
11 So Sad 3:59


The Sundowners were formed in 1959 in Lake George, New York; however they only ever released one LP, the cult classic Captain Nemo in 1968, a low selling record which you can now purchase for a shockingly cheap amount (in Mancunia anyway).

The Sundowners between 65 and their subsequent demise in the late sixties would be there or thereabouts, coming close to fame and fortune but never quite achieving it themselves, playing alongside such household names as The Monkees, Ike & Tina Turner and Jimi Hendrix. They also tried their arm at acting, appearing in a couple of films in the late sixties alongside some illustrious names, but soon they would vanish leaving not much of a trace.

However the one trail they did leave for us all was their one release in 1968, released on the Decca record label. This is somewhat of a Sunshine Pop/Psychedelic underground classic; Captain Nemo was very much overlooked by the record buying public of the day. This was probably due to the amount of quality albums being released in that year which no doubt out muscled The Sundowners down the pecking order, particular with the alternative less mainstream record buying public. It also suffers from not having a particular outstanding single, something which I will come back to.



But now forty years on, I think this album can be reassessed as a release which should have done a lot better. The production on the album for example, done by Sundowner guitarist Dominick DeMieri, is of a very high and exceptional standard; the songs as said previously although not particularly amazing, are of a quality which as a collection of songs makes you feel satisfied with life, and a front cover which it has to be said is a fine piece of art.

So all in all, this album is actually a strong piece containing some nice wholesome tracks. Songs like the opening track, Sunny Day People, Dear Undecided and Edge of Love certainly will not have you going back to the shop for a refund. A definite must for collectors and a general all round thumbs up from me.
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