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Old 10-20-2018, 02:42 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Can you pronounce thriller > thrila in a song text?

I'm not a native English speaker and I wonder if I can pronounce thriller > "thrila" in a song text?

Is it okay and doesn't sound like an error when spoken? (it will be still written "thriller" in the lyrics)

I know that for example "mister" can be "mista" when spoken.

I wish to get answers from native English speakers.
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Old 10-20-2018, 02:43 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I mean yeah sure. No reason you couldn't.
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Old 10-20-2018, 04:40 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilpoxi View Post
I'm not a native English speaker and I wonder if I can pronounce thriller > "thrila" in a song text?

Is it okay and doesn't sound like an error when spoken? (it will be still written "thriller" in the lyrics)

I know that for example "mister" can be "mista" when spoken.

I wish to get answers from native English speakers.
Sure, but it would be “thrilla” not “thrila”. Spelling it with one L implies a long I sound rather than the short I found in “thriller”.
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Old 10-20-2018, 04:42 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Go for it [with 2 L's, as mentioned above]. Going for a slant rhyme in your lyrics?
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Old 10-20-2018, 04:49 PM   #5 (permalink)
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It's just a matter of dialect. I'm from the American south, so sometimes words I say will sound different than the way someone from another part of the country will say it. Dialect, accent, and manner of speech is not a problem when asking if you CAN speak in a certain way. You should be fine.
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Old 10-20-2018, 04:55 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Old 10-21-2018, 12:11 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Ok, thanks for the answers.

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Originally Posted by [MERIT] View Post
Go for it [with 2 L's, as mentioned above]. Going for a slant rhyme in your lyrics?
Indeed it's about rhyming:

Fill in the bar
like a thriller
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Old 10-21-2018, 06:13 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Good and bad news from me, I'm afraid, Ilpoxi !

Firstly, the good news: as a Brit, I would certainly pronounce "thriller" as "thrilla". It wouldn't, however be a very accurate rhyme with "bar", which I presume sounds very similar to "car" and "are", with a longer, more rounded vowel sound. Actually, imo, a rhyme which is not a precise match is often more effective than a predictable, perfect match. I'd say that matching moon and June, tears and fears is not going to make for good lyrics.

I'm no lyric writer, but reading your lyric, I wonder about the natural stress of the words. I hope this conveys how your couplet would naturally sound in spoken British English:-

FILL inda BAAR
LYK a THRILLa

( The last syllable of thriller is short and very unstressed, exactly like the single word "a" in the middle of the same line. )

Good luck !
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Old 10-21-2018, 09:44 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Thank you for a good analysis and actual aspects, I appreciate that. But I'll be satisfied with the rhyming of just long A vowels.

By the way, maybe it's about how you decide to say it in a song (if you don't think about the stress factors in the spoken language):

FILLIN DABAAR
LYK-A THRILLAA

(?)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisnaholic View Post
Good and bad news from me, I'm afraid, Ilpoxi !

Firstly, the good news: as a Brit, I would certainly pronounce "thriller" as "thrilla". It wouldn't, however be a very accurate rhyme with "bar", which I presume sounds very similar to "car" and "are", with a longer, more rounded vowel sound. Actually, imo, a rhyme which is not a precise match is often more effective than a predictable, perfect match. I'd say that matching moon and June, tears and fears is not going to make for good lyrics.

I'm no lyric writer, but reading your lyric, I wonder about the natural stress of the words. I hope this conveys how your couplet would naturally sound in spoken British English:-

FILL inda BAAR
LYK a THRILLa

( The last syllable of thriller is short and very unstressed, exactly like the single word "a" in the middle of the same line. )

Good luck !
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Old 10-21-2018, 02:01 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilpoxi View Post
Thank you for a good analysis and actual aspects, I appreciate that. But I'll be satisfied with the rhyming of just long A vowels.

By the way, maybe it's about how you decide to say it in a song (if you don't think about the stress factors in the spoken language):

FILLIN DABAAR
LYK-A THRILLAA

(?)
If I'm pronouncing this right in my head, those two things DO sound like they should go together as a slant rhyme. Unorthodox, but I like it.
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