Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Classical
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-23-2012, 06:40 PM   #61 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
skaltezon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: hairball cluster
Posts: 325
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Engine View Post
I love this. Never heard it before and now I'll need to hear the whole thing performed on guitar.
That is a nice one. Here's the album.
skaltezon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 10:33 AM   #62 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Candyheart67's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1
Default New to classical

I think i love baroque the most of any classical period-I am new to classical but it seems to appeal to me the most
Candyheart67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2012, 03:32 PM   #63 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1
Default Nulla in mundo pax

Did this a few days ago as my leaver's piece. Hope you guys enjoy it. Do bear in mind this was done live at school so do excuse! xx

Wishsella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2012, 05:09 PM   #64 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
jawbreaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Paris area
Posts: 65
Default

little known german composer August Kühnel, who compose for viola di gamba, could easily compared to such contemporaries as Marin Marais or Forqueray.

__________________
"the secret of a long life is to try not to shorten it". My name is nobody, Sergio Leone, 1973
jawbreaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 10:41 AM   #65 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wishsella View Post
Did this a few days ago as my leaver's piece. Hope you guys enjoy it. Do bear in mind this was done live at school so do excuse! xx
I listened to your leaver's piece when you posted it, and since you will probably never return you may never read this, but I still wanted to say that you sang Nulla in mundo pax very sweetly and beautifully, Sarah.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jawbreaker View Post
little known german composer August Kühnel, who compose for viola di gamba, could easily compared to such contemporaries as Marin Marais or Forqueray.

^ It took me a minute to realize that the musicians are playing instruments with six strings. Now I know what a viola da gamba (or viol) is, thanks to you.
Viol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

* * * * *

And now...

R E C O R D E R M U S I C

Telemann - Suite in A Minor

Impressive recorder playing!


Telemann - Suite in A Minor TWV55:a2 (excerpts) - YouTube


Last month I began learning (or relearning) to play the nice little wooden soprano recorder that my parents got me when I was five in Germany and that managed to survive its trip back to the U.S. and many years in storage. My goal: to play well enough so that I can join my dad in his recorder quartet as a fellow recorder player rather than a violinist. (Our group is currently four recorders and one violin, an unusual quartet.)

So my next 100 posts in this thread may be of recorder music. Just wanted to warn all you Baroque fans out there!

ABOUT GEORG PHILIPP TELEMANN

I am impressed that Telemann taught himself how to play instruments and started composing against his family's wishes when he was a child.

Below is a quote that describes Telemann's determination and early clandastine life as a composer. I was amused by his mother's paranoid fear that cultivating Telemann's interest in music would start him down the slippery slope that ends in the worst of imagined professions: monkey trainer! I like how Telemann persevered in doing what he loved and was able to steep his long life in music (and also poetry, which he adored).

Quote:
From: Music Essays - Telemann: A Forgotten Master

He [Telemann] was not yet twelve years of age when he began to compose. The Cantor whom he assisted wrote music. The child did not fail to read his scores in secret; and he used to think how glorious it was to make up such beautiful things. He too began to write music, without confiding the fact to anyone; he had his compositions submitted to the Cantor under a pseudonym and had the joy of hearing them praised—and better still, sung —in church and even in the streets. He grew bolder. An operatic libretto came his way; he set it to music. 0, Happiness! The opera was performed in a theater and the young author even filled one of the parts!

"Ah! but what a storm I drew upon my head with my opera!" he writes. "The enemies of music came in a host to see my mother and represented to her that I should become a charlatan, a tightrope walker, a mummer, a trainer of monkeys, etc. ... if music were not prohibited! No sooner said than done; they took from me my notes, my instruments, and with them half my life."
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 09:03 AM   #66 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

Continuing my excursion through Baroque recorder music, I present...

J.S. Bach -- "Sheep May Safely Graze" Aria from Cantata 208

In Bach's famous piece, you can hear two recorders tootling along happily in the background, evoking images of pastoral meadows.

A website about "Sheep" says, "That cantata is seldom performed today, but one of its movements--an aria for soprano with two obbligato recorders titled Schäfe können sicher weichen ("Sheep May Safely Graze")--has become some of the most famous music Bach ever wrote. The aria makes a point that would have appealed to the Duke [for whom Bach wrote the cantata]: sheep (the citizens) are safe when they are guarded by a good shepherd (the prince)." La Jolla Music Society - JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH: Sheep May Safely Graze

If you are interested in the political lyrics of "Sheep May Safely Graze," you can read about them here: http://www.musicbanter.com/classical...tml#post770730

Amusingly, the person who posted this video (below) on YouTube entitled it "Authentic Period Sheep May Safely Graze," about which some whippersnapper commented:

Quote:
"I love the 'authentic period sheep.' I am so sick of hearing this piece with modern sheep. The music really comes alive when you use the proper animal. Myself, I prefer German Bergschaf sheep, although I have a recording of this piece with some Devon Longwoolled that I really enjoy. Intonation is always a problem with period sheep, but the musicians in your recording are impeccable. The textures are warm and comforting without being too scratchy."
Ah, those quirky lovers of classical music.

Enjoy the authentic period sheep:


Authentic Period Sheep May Safely Graze BWV208 Hunt Cantata - YouTube
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 10:22 PM   #67 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

Now here is a beautiful Baroque piece with recorder replacing the usual violin solo:

Arcangelo Corelli - "La Folia" Sonata in D Minor, Op. 5 No. 12
with Recorder (instead of Violin) and Basso


..


^ I feel the recorder in this version of "La Folia" holds its own remarkably well compared to the original where the violin plays the solo as intended by A. Corelli, especially considering what a simple little instrument a recorder is.

What's this?!? You don't remember hearing A. corelli's "La Folia" with violin, you say?? Well, luckily for you, even though it was posted earlier in this thread (partly by me), I am posting it again so that you can compare the recorder and violin versions.

My other reason is that I feel this is one of the finest pieces composed everrrrr!! If I were stuck on a desert island with only one piece of music to listen to until I perished ten days later of dehydration, I think this would be the song I'd select:

Arcangelo Corelli - "La Folia" Sonata in D Minor, Op. 5 No. 12
with Violin and Basso


..
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 02:19 AM   #68 (permalink)
air quote
 
Engine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: pollen & mold
Posts: 3,050
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGANGELICA View Post
My other reason is that I feel this is one of the finest pieces composed everrrrr!! If I were stuck on a desert island with only one piece of music to listen to until I perished ten days later of dehydration, I think this would be the song I'd select:

Arcangelo Corelli - "La Folia" Sonata in D Minor, Op. 5 No. 12
with Violin and Basso


..
Oh my god, this is the best music I've heard in quite a while. If you ever go on a doomed cruise, let me know and I'll come with and bring 10 gallons of fresh water as my luggage so that we can listen to this for as long as possible as we gradually die on that uncharted desert island.
__________________
Like an arrow,
I was only passing through.
Engine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 11:53 AM   #69 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Engine View Post
Oh my god, this is the best music I've heard in quite a while. If you ever go on a doomed cruise, let me know and I'll come with and bring 10 gallons of fresh water as my luggage so that we can listen to this for as long as possible as we gradually die on that uncharted desert island.
It is great, isn't it!

When I chart my doomed cruise in 60 years, I will definitely let you know. Once we're on the island, if we don't end up in a bare-handed fight for your 10 gallons of fresh water and instead share it equitably, drinking only 1 quart per day (the minimum needed to survive, I read) will give us each...(calculate, calculate)...20 glorious days to live and enjoy Corelli's "La Folia" before the water runs out!!

Then we will be left with 10 more days to spend sprawled on our backs in the sand under the warm sun, and the moon and stars by night, as we drift off into parched unconsciousness to the strains of that lovely music. Not a bad way to go, all things considered.



* * *

Telemann - Trio Sonata in A Minor -- Performed by Amarillis
with Recorder, Baroque Violin, viola da gamba, and harpsicord


I posted an excerpt earlier, but here is the whole of this very pleasant and engaging piece that incorporates the charming toots and whistles of the recorder. I especially like hearing the vigorous conversations between recorder and violin in the fourth movement:

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"

Last edited by VEGANGELICA; 08-14-2012 at 12:23 PM. Reason: I found a better recording of Telemann's Trio Sonata in A Minor
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2012, 12:15 PM   #70 (permalink)
Facilitator
 
VEGANGELICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Where people kill 30 million pigs per year
Posts: 1,993
Default

Telemann - a Trio Sonata (not sure which one)
noteworthy because of the GREAT BASS RECORDER played by a member of the Formosa recorder quartet.

Great Bass Recorders:



Telemann :Triosonata--by Formosa recorder quartet
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan:
If a chicken was smart enough to be able to speak English and run in a geometric pattern, then I think it should be smart enough to dial 911 (999) before getting the axe, and scream to the operator, "Something must be done! Something must be done!"
VEGANGELICA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.