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Old 11-20-2011, 07:54 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Trying Not To Be Redundant During Classical Period Week!


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The dates of the Classical Period in Western music are generally accepted as being between about 1750 and 1830. However, the term classical music is used colloquially to describe a variety of Western musical styles from the ninth century to the present, and especially from the sixteenth or seventeenth to the nineteenth. This article is about the specific period from 1750 to 1830.[1]
The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. The best known composers from this period are Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, and Franz Schubert; other notable names include Luigi Boccherini, Muzio Clementi, Antonio Soler, Antonio Salieri, François Joseph Gossec, Johann Stamitz, Carl Friedrich Abel, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, and Christoph Willibald Gluck. Ludwig van Beethoven is also sometimes regarded either as a Romantic composer or a composer who was part of the transition to the Romantic; Franz Schubert is also something of a transitional figure, as are Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Mauro Giuliani, Friedrich Kuhlau, Fernando Sor, Luigi Cherubini, Jan Ladislav Dussek, and Carl Maria von Weber. The period is sometimes referred to as the era of Viennese Classic or Classicism (German: Wiener Klassik), since Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Joseph Haydn, and Ludwig van Beethoven all worked at some time in Vienna, and Franz Schubert was born there.
RYM's top Classical Period releases
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Old 11-20-2011, 09:17 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I've been waiting for this one! I wonder if we are also doing any other periods of Western Art Music, like Renaissance or Baroque, for example?

Here is my favourite piece from Luigi Boccherini (1743-1805), String Quintet No. 5 in E Major, Op. 11: III. Minuet. It is probably also his most famous piece of music.



Everyone knows the first movement of Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata", but my favourite movement is the third:



A beautiful piece of music from Mozart, highlighting the harmonic achievements of the Common Practice Period. Requiem in D minor, K. 626: Sequence VI. Lacrimosa Dies Illa. This movement, along with the subsequent movements in the Requiem, were left unfinished by Mozart due to his death - they were completed by Franz Xaver Süssmayr, a student of Antonio Salieri (and that is how he was associated with Mozart)



Johann Ludwig Krebs (1713-1780), Fugue in Bb Major



A beautiful harpsichord piece by Armand-Louis Couperin La Chéron



That's all I can think of for now, enjoy
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Old 11-26-2011, 04:52 AM   #3 (permalink)
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"Trying Not To Be Redundant". Yessss, I got the joke!!! You know, "not redundant"...... that is, Classical and all that.... It's funny 'cause it's true.

Classicism expressed through serene beauty.

*Someone had to mention Für Elise (Beethoven):




*Mozart has been mentioned, but now.... clarinet! Concerto in A major, K 622. This is the 2nd movement (clarinet: Martin Fröst):

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Old 11-26-2011, 06:01 AM   #4 (permalink)
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My girlfriend's one true love in classical music is Mozart's Requiem (which is hard not to love, to be fair ). Personally I prefer other eras, mainly Baroque - being a bass, the prevalence of homophony in Classical makes it kinda boring at times... It's certainly true to say that a lot of Mozart's Missas Brevis sound rather... similar.
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Old 11-26-2011, 02:34 PM   #5 (permalink)
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The actual Classical Era is my least favorite portion of what we call classical music. I often find it too overwrought, churchy and dainty. There was some good stuff going on there though. Here's something by Carl Freidrich Abel:

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Old 12-04-2011, 02:28 AM   #6 (permalink)
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The actual Classical Era is my least favorite portion of what we call classical music. I often find it too overwrought, churchy and dainty.
This period does get some criticism from some classical listeners. Of course some of the very greatest names within the whole of classical actually originate from this period (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert), but beyond them people don't tend to know much of the music. Also very important genres like the symphony and string quartet originated and flourished. I think it helps to look at the full development of it up to about 1830 when you could say the romantic period started more obviously with the Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique. The High Classical is more the earlier period up to about 1800 or maybe slightly earlier during the 1790s. But I think it continued to develop beyond that and even had lasting influence with the sonata form structure on many important later composers (like Brahms).
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Old 12-29-2011, 09:26 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Burning Down View Post
I've been waiting for this one! I wonder if we are also doing any other periods of Western Art Music, like Renaissance or Baroque, for example?

Here is my favourite piece from Luigi Boccherini (1743-1805), String Quintet No. 5 in E Major, Op. 11: III. Minuet. It is probably also his most famous piece of music.



Haven't heard that in ages, thanks!
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Old 12-29-2011, 09:32 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Haven't heard that in ages, thanks!
You're welcome!
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:45 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by starrynight View Post
This period does get some criticism from some classical listeners. Of course some of the very greatest names within the whole of classical actually originate from this period (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert), but beyond them people don't tend to know much of the music. Also very important genres like the symphony and string quartet originated and flourished. I think it helps to look at the full development of it up to about 1830 when you could say the romantic period started more obviously with the Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique. The High Classical is more the earlier period up to about 1800 or maybe slightly earlier during the 1790s. But I think it continued to develop beyond that and even had lasting influence with the sonata form structure on many important later composers (like Brahms).
Dull, dainty, churchy, and overwrought.





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