Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Classical
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-08-2015, 12:32 PM   #1 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In the fires of your own disillusion
Posts: 684
Default Paganini for temporary boost in spatial reasoning

As of late, I've reignited my passion for upbeat classical music, and trying to find something complex enough to boost spatial reasoning performance for when I do math with my kids... I've been recommended to Paganini but would like to explore other options as well, since I'm very rusty in this genre.

Any recommendations??
ChelseaDagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 12:38 PM   #2 (permalink)
Gotcha
 
Frownland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Atop of the Throne
Posts: 30,542
Default

It sounds like you're talking about the Mozart effect, which has been proven to be a myth. Still, it can't hurt to give your children a musical vocabulary by showing them the greats. Here are some of my favourites: Schoenberg, Bach, Mozart, Richard Strauss, Terry Riley, Wagner, Schubert, Chopin, Tchaickovsky, John Cage, and Steve Reich.

Out of the above, Steve Reich's Music for 18 Musicians is the closest to "thinking music".
__________________
At a time like this, scorching irony, not convincing argument, is needed.

Frownland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 01:08 PM   #3 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In the fires of your own disillusion
Posts: 684
Default

Actually the Mozart effect is based on the premise that classical music can actually raise your IQ, which is obvious rubbish that was debunked ages ago, I'm not arguing with that.... but the TEMPORARY effects on certain neurological pathways becoming temporarily stimulated has been verified from a neurological approach. That's what in wondering about:

WHICH classical music best ignites the neurons that run along the spatial reasoning pathways of the brain??
ChelseaDagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 01:10 PM   #4 (permalink)
Gotcha
 
Frownland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Atop of the Throne
Posts: 30,542
Default

Schoenberg makes my neurons flood with electricity. Not too sure which in regions though, I'll go get an MRI and get back to you.
__________________
At a time like this, scorching irony, not convincing argument, is needed.

Frownland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 01:13 PM   #5 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In the fires of your own disillusion
Posts: 684
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland View Post
Schoenberg makes my neurons flood with electricity. Not too sure which in regions though, I'll go get an MRI and get back to you.
Not necessary . Thanks for the recommendation.
ChelseaDagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 01:24 PM   #6 (permalink)
.
 
grindy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: .
Posts: 6,360
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChelseaDagger View Post
Actually the Mozart effect is based on the premise that classical music can actually raise your IQ, which is obvious rubbish that was debunked ages ago, I'm not arguing with that.... but the TEMPORARY effects on certain neurological pathways becoming temporarily stimulated has been verified from a neurological approach. That's what in wondering about:

WHICH classical music best ignites the neurons that run along the spatial reasoning pathways of the brain??
As far as I know there is no correlation between the complexity of the music and the short-time increase in spatial reasoning. In fact it has been suggested, that every type of upbeat music, not only classical, may have this effect. Although I for one think it's a good thing for children to grow up with classical music.
It would probably be best to find out which music resonates most with your kids. Finding something they actually like and can relate to might have the best effect, instead of listening to things pretentious people like Frownie or me would recommend.
__________________
A smell of petroleum prevails throughout.
grindy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 01:26 PM   #7 (permalink)
Gotcha
 
Frownland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Atop of the Throne
Posts: 30,542
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by grindy View Post
It would probably be best to find out which music resonates most with your kids. Finding something they actually like and can relate to might have the best effect, instead of listening to things pretentious people like Frownie or me would recommend.
There have been studies that show that listening to music that you enjoy boosts brain activity, so I second this suggestion.
__________________
At a time like this, scorching irony, not convincing argument, is needed.

Frownland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 02:51 PM   #8 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In the fires of your own disillusion
Posts: 684
Default

Indeed.

They have been exposed to my current rut, which includes a schizophrenic mix of Celtic music, binaural beats, Bob Dylan, Billy Joel, rockabilly, Counting Crows, and of course a lot of Collective Soul and Fratellis . It's interesting to watch different sounds bring about different responses from each of them... My two oldest have sensory processing challenges and seem to work better when "primed" with appropriate beats (whatever wavelengths they seem to connect with on any given day, that is)...I play music with teaching strategies in mind (a la "Frames of Mind" by Howard Gardner) because I really want music to help channel their other abilities. That's why I'm open to new suggestions from people less musically rusty than myself, who connect to the same wavelengths that my children and I do, but who have tasted and digested a variety of sounds and artists within these genres.
ChelseaDagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 02:53 PM   #9 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In the fires of your own disillusion
Posts: 684
Default

... If that makes any sense lol
ChelseaDagger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2015, 02:57 PM   #10 (permalink)
.
 
grindy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: .
Posts: 6,360
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChelseaDagger View Post
Indeed.

They have been exposed to my current rut, which includes a schizophrenic mix of Celtic music, binaural beats, Bob Dylan, Billy Joel, rockabilly, Counting Crows, and of course a lot of Collective Soul and Fratellis . It's interesting to watch different sounds bring about different responses from each of them... My two oldest have sensory processing challenges and seem to work better when "primed" with appropriate beats (whatever wavelengths they seem to connect with on any given day, that is)...I play music with teaching strategies in mind (a la "Frames of Mind" by Howard Gardner) because I really want music to help channel their other abilities. That's why I'm open to new suggestions from people less musically rusty than myself, who connect to the same wavelengths that my children and I do, but who have tasted and digested a variety of sounds and artists within these genres.

As a kid Vivaldi's Four Seasons were my favourite, totally blew my mind back then.

P.S.: Try not to make listening to music a chore for them, though.
They should see it as a world of wonder, fun and possibilities.
__________________
A smell of petroleum prevails throughout.
grindy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.