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Old 08-23-2007, 08:34 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Rock & Roll Timeline Part One 1950-1959

As part of my Rock & Roll History Project I am currently constructing a Rock & Roll timeline from 1950 on.

I want to include between 1-6 tracks from each year that reflect the various trends and evolution in rock and roll sound.

So for this thread I thought I'd see if we can create our own for the MusicBanter site loosely following my template.


ROCK & ROLL TIMELINE

1950
The Fat Man, Fats Domino: The arrival of the rock and roll sound. YouTube - Fats Domino - The Fat Man (Live)

1951
Rocket 88, Jackie Brenston: Often considered the first rock and roll song ever played on the air thanks to Sam Phillips. YouTube - Jackie Brenston & The Delta Cats - singin' - "Rocket 88"

1952
Lawdy Miss Clawdy, Lloyd Price:
The beginning of the melding of New Orleans Jazz and Rhythm & Blues into "Rock & Roll". Featuring Fats Domino on Piano.

1953
Mess Around, Ray Charles: The most innovative artist of his and maybe any other era arrives on the scene brining Rock influence.

1954
Rock Around the Clock, Bill Haley & His Comets: First Rock Song used in a Movie
That’s Alright, Elvis Presley: Rock & Roll is on the verge of mainstream pandemonium as Elvis releases first first single bringing a stunning sound and look to the blues.

1955
I’m a Man, Bo Diddley: The originator unveils "Bo Diddley" with this memorable B-side bringing what become to most resonant sound to Rock & Roll in the first half of the 1950's.
Maybellene, Chuck Berry: Another Rock & Roll pioneer's debut and a major push towards the fast approaching sounds of the 60's.
Tutti-Frutti, Little Richard: Funk is born. Enigmatic with unparalleled energy.

1956
Hound Dog, Elvis Presley: "The King" finds his sound and Rock & Roll is America's newest fad.
I Walk the Line, Johnny Cash: Country music's influence in rock and roll often can be traced back to the man who some say invented the Rock Star
Blueberry Hill, Fats Domino: Perhaps his most significant work and undoubtedly a precursor to Motown.

1957
That’ll be the Day, Buddy Holly & The Crickets: Stirring version of the song often considered one of Rock's most significant. Buddy Hollys impact was huge despite it's short tenure. YouTube - Buddy Holly - That ll Be the Day
Everyday, Buddy Holly: Another side of Buddy Holly's immense talents. YouTube - Buddy Holly - Everyday - music only
Whole Lot of Shakin’ Going On, Jerry Lee Lewis: Rockabilly's biggest contributor of the 1960's.

1958
Johnny B. Goode, Chuck Berry: The Quintessential 1950's Rock Song. YouTube - Chuck Berry - Johnny B. Goode
Lonely Teardrops, Jackie Wilson: Another dimension of Rock; The Doo-wopey sound became a theme in the late 50's and early 60's. YouTube - Jackie Wilson - Lonely Teardrops

1959
What’d I Say, Ray Charles: His Breakout Hit and one of the true masterpieces in music history. YouTube - Ray Charles . What'di Say
Shout,The Isley Brothers: Boldly announced the arrival of the 1960's and Rock's evolving sound. A response to Lonely Teardrops and it's innovative style. YouTube - Shout! - The Isley Brothers

Last edited by Son of JayJamJah; 08-23-2007 at 10:30 PM.
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Old 08-23-2007, 08:53 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Old 08-23-2007, 10:39 PM   #3 (permalink)
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This Section Reserved for Videos Relevant to the Discussion

The Big Bopper - Chantilly Lace (1958)
YouTube - The Big Bopper - Chantilly Lace

Eddie Cochran - C'mon Everybody
YouTube - Eddie Cochran - C'mon Everybody

Last edited by Son of JayJamJah; 08-24-2007 at 07:20 PM.
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Old 08-24-2007, 01:05 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Good work. Check out Thisdayinmusic.com good site for music history.
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Old 08-24-2007, 01:24 AM   #5 (permalink)
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A number of the songs listed aren't even rock & roll.

"The Fat Man" and the original version of "Rocket 88" are R&B numbers, not rock. Jackie Brentson & the Delta Cats weren't even a real group. Ike Turner wrote "Rocket 88".

The 1951 cover of "Rocket 88" by Bill Haley & the Saddlemen, is considered by most to be the first true rock & roll record.

Also, in 1953 Bill Haley & His Comets released "Crazy Man, Crazy", the first rock record to be heard on national television. Another very important song that should be on the list.

"Lawdy Miss Clawdy" and "Mess Around" were R&B.

Jackie Wilson was a mix of soul and R&B. "Lonely Teardrops" wasn't doo wop or rock.

Ray Charles was also a mix of soul and R&B. He never recorded a song that can be considered genuine rock & roll.

Same with the Isley's---soul and R&B, not rock.

Chuck Berry's "Maybellene" was rock, but he swiped the basic tune from the traditional country song "Ida Red", which had been made popular in the 40's by Bob Wills.

Elvis Presley's enormously influential "Heartbreak Hotel" from 1956 should've been on the list. Paul McCartney, John Lennon and Keith Richards have all credited "Heartbreak" as being the one song that made them decide they wanted to be rock & rollers.

"Blueberry Hill" wasn't written by Fats Domino. The song was first recorded by country star Gene Autry in 1941, as well as Glenn Miller shortly after that. It's definitely a stretch to call it a rock song.
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Old 08-24-2007, 11:10 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Every Song listed is either credited as rock and roll or as a major rock & roll influence.

"The Fat Man" is often as i mentioned considered the first song with a rock & roll sound.

While you are correct about Jackie Brenston's Rocket 88, that was the credited name. Turners Kings of Rhythm were the band behind it, but it was credited to Jackie Brenston.

As for your other categorical claims, many different styles were melded to create rock & roll. In addition I could provide plenty of links that would classify them specifically as rock and roll so I'd say they undoubtedly fit under the umbrella of the genre.

Blueberry Hill is considered a Rock & Roll standard by the way.
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Old 08-24-2007, 11:16 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Link Wray was the first rock & roll artist.
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Old 08-24-2007, 12:03 PM   #8 (permalink)
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No mention of skiffle?

That was a huge influence on the likes of The Beatles & other early British acts.
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Old 08-24-2007, 12:17 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Good to see the Isley Brothers and Jackie Wilson in there.

But where's Eddie Cochran?
'C'mon Everybody', 'Summertime Blues', '3 Steps To Heaven' and 'Somethin' Else'.

All essential for the 50's.
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Old 08-24-2007, 12:25 PM   #10 (permalink)
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YouTube - Eddie Cochran - C'mon Everybody

Eddie Cochran's influence on future bands shouldn't be overlooked.

His Gretsch guitar has a story to tell too...

The car and other items from the crash were impounded at the local police station until a coroners' inquest could be held.
At that time, David Harman, later known as Dave Dee of the band Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich, was a police cadet at the station, and taught himself to play guitar on Eddie's impounded Gretsch.

Strangely enough, an unknown rock 'n' roll fan called Mark Feld had carried the same guitar to the limo from a London gig the night before.
Feld later changed his name to Marc Bolan and became one of the stars of the British Glam Rock scene of the 1970s.
Marc Bolan also died in a car crash in 1977.
wiki.
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