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Old 01-03-2012, 04:43 PM   #51 (permalink)
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Would it be okay to solo over the chord changes in the same key as the key signature? For example, say the chord progession is in the key of A, but it goes through many different chords like C chords and F chords. Would it be okay to just solo in the key of A the entire time?
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Old 01-03-2012, 06:52 PM   #52 (permalink)
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key of A should have C#m and F#m chords, not C and F, unless it's song without a tonal centre

soloing in a A scale is fine, if you're playing rock or blues

if you want to play jazz, it's better to find the relative scale
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Old 01-03-2012, 07:25 PM   #53 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Il Duce View Post
key of A should have C#m and F#m chords, not C and F, unless it's song without a tonal centre

soloing in a A scale is fine, if you're playing rock or blues

if you want to play jazz, it's better to find the relative scale
I just used that as an example. I didn't take the time to look at my key progression chart. Don't have it memorized yet.
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:58 AM   #54 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Il Duce View Post
key of A should have C#m and F#m chords, not C and F, unless it's song without a tonal centre
It doesn't have to be made up completely of diatonic chords to keep its tonal center, tonality isn't that fragile, especially in this case where we have a Parallel key.

If you take this progession



and elaborate it with secondary dominants



it changes nothing in the function of the initial triads.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:19 AM   #55 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Rubato View Post
It doesn't have to be made up completely of diatonic chords to keep its tonal center, tonality isn't that fragile, especially in this case where we have a Parallel key.

If you take this progession



and elaborate it with secondary dominants



it changes nothing in the function of the initial triads.
Secondary Dominants function as passing chords, just like any notes other than A B C# D E F# G# would function as passing or lead tones in the key of A Major.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:47 AM   #56 (permalink)
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Secondary Dominants function as passing chords, just like any notes other than A B C# D E F# G# would function as passing or lead tones in the key of A Major.
They still don't effect the tonal center. Calling them passing chords doesn't do them much justice since not many chords can be said to have structural significance, the first two bars are merely a prolongation of I-IV and bars 4-7 a prolongation of V, so really "passing chord" can apply to almost every chord in a piece of music.
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Old 01-04-2012, 11:05 AM   #57 (permalink)
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A passing chord is a non diatonic chord that connects, or passes between, the notes of two diatonic chords. In the case of your sub dominants, they won't affect the overall tonality of the diatonic progression because they function as little cadences.

If you applied longer durations to each chord you'd find that those 'passing chords' begin to take on more weight and are no longer a part of the original tonal center.
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Old 01-04-2012, 11:29 AM   #58 (permalink)
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A passing chord is a non diatonic chord that connects, or passes between, the notes of two diatonic chords. In the case of your sub dominants, they won't affect the overall tonality of the diatonic progression because they function as little cadences.
But those diatonic notes have no real bearing on the tonality as they aren't structural, if you follow the bass it makes a clear step wise decent towards the sub dominant then wraps itself around the dominant before leaping back to the tonic. The diatonic chords are passing between these structural points just as much as the non diatonic ones, calling it a passing chord with no context is just bad terminology.


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If you applied longer durations to each chord you'd find that those 'passing chords' begin to take on more weight and are no longer a part of the original tonal center.
not necessarily no, it would have moved away from the tonal center but cannot abandon it without establishing a new center or using multiple non functioning chords, you could even write a few measures in a different region without losing the initial tonal center.
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Old 01-04-2012, 11:38 AM   #59 (permalink)
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But those diatonic notes have no real bearing on the tonality as they aren't structural, if you follow the bass it makes a clear step wise decent towards the sub dominant then wraps itself around the dominant before leaping back to the tonic. The diatonic chords are passing between these structural points just as much as the non diatonic ones, calling it a passing chord with no context is just bad terminology.




not necessarily no, it would have moved away from the tonal center but cannot abandon it without establishing a new center or using multiple non functioning chords, you could even write a few measures in a different region without losing the initial tonal center.
So, if you were to write a melody in A Major over your progression nothing would sound out of key? I think it would because of the secondary dominants you've placed in between the diatonic progression. Unless of course you adjust the melody to follow the chords, but that would be straying from the tonal center.
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Old 01-04-2012, 11:53 AM   #60 (permalink)
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So, if you were to write a melody in A Major over your progression nothing would sound out of key? I think it would because of the secondary dominants you've placed in between the diatonic progression. Unless of course you adjust the melody to follow the chords, but that would be straying from the tonal center.
There would be a high risk of running into cross relations but yes you could. I detest any attempt at separating melody and harmony anyway, both should be considered simultaneously.
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