Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The MB Reader > Album Reviews
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-20-2009, 09:26 PM   #11 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
music_phantom13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 941
Default

So I just listened to the Sindelfingen tracks, and I really need this album *wink, wink* This was amazing. Every time I thought oh, I see where they're going here, my idea was completely obliterated. All over the place, and absolutely genius from the songs you posted. A few times it kind of made me laugh (the short little distorted polka bit towards the end of the first video) and the rest of the time pretty much blew my mind, sucking me in more than a lot of what I hear. Excluding Yes, and perhaps Opeth if any of their later albums were prog, I haven't given much time to prog, and this could very well change that.

Don't like Rainbow all that much. But Colin Blunstone, on the other hand... despite the fact that it doesn't match my normal music preferences, I think I prefer One Year to Odessey and Oracle. I like psychedelic pop and the jazz undertones of the Zombies a lot, but this albums is just... beautiful, I guess. I don't know what else to call it. Though Pink Moon is better, I don't see Nick Drake needing to be jealous.

And you posted England while I was typing it... I remember again why I don't like a lot of prog. I just absolutely cannot get into bands like Gentle Giant or this. Though I will admit people that write off all prog as a "cheesy pretentious" genre are just being close minded idiots. There's bound to be something for everyone in just about every genre... Great thread, by the way. Good reviews so far keep em coming
music_phantom13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2009, 10:14 PM   #12 (permalink)
Master Of Muzak
 
Anteater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere swarthy
Posts: 3,974
Default

Thank ya' kindly phantom for the feedback! I also personally feel One Year edges out Odessey and Oracle by a couple of hairs for the same reasons. I only threw in the Nick Drake reference to appeal to people who enjoy a good shot of beautiful melancholy and incite them to compare for themselves.

But I actually think you might enjoy England some if you like any of Yes's albums, given some time and all. The vocals and progressions are very reminiscent of Yes after all, plus they're rather sharp on the instrumental side of things too.
__________________
My Top 30 Albums of 2018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland
You can't blame the Jews for everything...just most things.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultHawk
Trump might be the best thing since free jazz.
Anteater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2009, 04:19 AM   #13 (permalink)
Blue Bleezin' Blind Drunk
 
NumberNineDream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The land of the largest wine glass (aka Lebanon)
Posts: 2,183
Default

Well I am a Zombies fan that's why I picked up One Year, from what I gathered of the review, I must like it.
Loved the England songs, and the review in all, would love a link on that one, couldn't find it anywhere.

Keep it up
__________________
Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?

NumberNineDream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2009, 07:31 PM   #14 (permalink)
Master Of Muzak
 
Anteater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere swarthy
Posts: 3,974
Default

Mu – S/T (1971)


"Captain Beefheart's #1 slide guitarist playing some killer psychedelic blues with friends."

1. Ain't No Blues (4:08)
2. Ballad Of Brother Lew (4:34)
3. Blue Form (4:09)
4. Interlude (1:59)
5. Nobody Wants To Shine (4:12)
6. Eternal Thirst (9:38)
7. Too Naked For Demetrius (2:36)
8. Mumbella Day (3:24)
9. The Clouds Went That Way (3:10)


The world is full of questions that may never be answered: Where do we go when we die? How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie pop? Dude, where's my car? What would Captain Beefheart's Magic Band sound like doing psychedelic/jazzy rock?

We may never get to the bottom of most of those inquiries, but the last of them is brought to light in a spectacularly trippy fashion here on Mu's extremely rare yet fucking amazing 1971 debut, featuring Jeff Cotton from CB on slide-guitar and saxophone, as well as a host of other amazing musicians such as Merrell Fankhauser on vocals. Fun and fantastic while still retaining a very tight experimental edge, this is a work very different in feel and approach to most of Captain Beefheart's menagerie of records, but stands out more than anything Jeff Cotton did with Don Glen Vliet in some places in the sheer grooves issued, but never to the point where you forget to be engaged in what you're listening to.

Don't be fooled by the "blues-rock" tag either; this is a finely varied effort across the map, tipping its hat off to folk and art-rock even while it picks away to a West Coast sunset from 1967 with some sax crying out toward the rising night. Typical blues-bars will suddenly expand into odd time signatures without backing out any inch of melody or lick, a testament to the skill of Cotton and living proof that such a fantastic combination of elements and genre-fusion don't come around very often. This is best illustrated on tracks such as 'Nobody Wants To Shine' and the 9-minute cruncher 'Eternal Thirst', the latter of which morphs into something like Afro-pop midway through and only gets better as the minutes tick on by.




Ultimately, Mu's self-titled does a lot of things right and pretty much nothing wrong. It's got a bit of crossover appeal for nearly everyone, from folks who love the avant-garde to people who go nuclear for the blues and psychedelic rock, sitting at a wonderfully balanced happy place between some of Beefheart's more impenetrable songwriting and some of the more straightforward, dynamic energy that's seen more often in Krautrock and progressive rock circles.

Therefore, anyone looking for a curious early 70's slice of artsy blues rock with an edge should PM me for this immediately. Or if you just want to hear something like Captain Beefheart crossed with early Pink Floyd. In either case, there's plenty of satisfaction to be had.
__________________
My Top 30 Albums of 2018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland
You can't blame the Jews for everything...just most things.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultHawk
Trump might be the best thing since free jazz.

Last edited by Anteater; 12-22-2009 at 07:42 PM.
Anteater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2009, 09:32 AM   #15 (permalink)
Juicious Maximus III
 
tore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Scabb Island
Posts: 5,935
Default

Great, I just found this thread this morning and as I'm writing this, I'm currently on the wireless which is taking me away from where I live so I can go celebrate christmas with the family. I'd love to check more of these albums out right now, but it seems I'll have to wait until new years.

Still, it's not all new. I was surprised and quite happy to see Rainbow get a mention Rising is one of those albums that have gotten a fair amount of play from me a couple of years ago. I still find a lot of Rainbow tracks on burned CDs in my parents' car. Odgipig I already checked out on your recomendation and their debut is certainly interesting.

England and Mu sounds the most interesting to me at the moment - although I thought I'd drop playing those youtube vids on the buss. Of course there had to be a prog-outfit called England by the way .. I mean, there's one called U.K., so.

Anyways, great thread and I'm rooting fot you in the member awards for best writer. You deserve it
__________________
In the age of information, ignorance is a choice.
tore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2009, 02:41 PM   #16 (permalink)
Master Of Muzak
 
Anteater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere swarthy
Posts: 3,974
Default

^ Ah shucks Tore, thanks for the nomination. Glad you've enjoyed the thread so far, and hope you have some merry holidays over the next couple of days.

And now...

Miles Davis – On The Corner (1972)


"The King of Jazz goes funky and commercial...and in the process redefined what music could become."

1. On the Corner (19:55)
2. Black Satin (5:16)
3. One and One (6:09)
4. Helen Butte / Mr. Freedom X (23:18)


Miles Davis is a musician that never has and never will need an introduction. From the 40's up until the early 90's he was Jazz's favorite spokesman and among the most well known entrepreneurs working in music period. As the 70's dawned, when the idea of electric guitar playing alongside a sax quartet horrified traditional jazz critics, Miles Davis recorded A Silent Way and then the ever lauded Bitches Brew and shut them all up for good. In 1991 when had ever really tried to do a serious jazz-rap album, Davis brought out Doo-Bop just in time to die from a stroke at the ripe young age of 65.

Still, the impact of these aforementioned works pale in comparison to a particular work of Davis's from 1972, an album so far ahead of its time that it not only bombed commercially, but was nearly forgotten by even Davis's own fanbase. It's a funky beat-busting little ditty that almost singlehandedly laid that foundations for both post-punk and drum n' bass over a decade before either genre had even begun to stir in the minds of their creators.

Ladies and gents, welcome to On The Corner!

The title track which opens the album, although a potentially turn-offer clocking at the 20 minute mark, is most definitely an ear catcher despite the length and memorable as well. The groove is immediate, explosive and thick with snaking polyrhythms from the percussion and drumming, supported from the depths of the mix by some wah-wah guitar riffagee and Davis's snarky trumpet. Tempo changes are prominent, noticeably quieting down around the 6:40 mark at first and slowly picking up speed as it goes uphill for the remaining fourteen minutes. If I had to sum up the experience of this piece in one word, it would probably be "Hard-boiled"




Next comes my personal favorite 'Black Satin', a five minuter that could most definitely be considered a big forerunner to early drum n' bass, particularly in regards to the opening beat and how it spirals down over the ensuing minutes. It's also got a few electronic touches that are pretty nice.



The last two tracks are well up there with the best Davis has ever done as well. 'One And One' has a strong Eastern feel underlying the drums and trumpeting, making one think of some of Coltrane's mid 60's work with a funkier beat, while 'Helen Butte/Mr. Freedom X', as expected of a strong closing suite, pulls elements from all the other tracks into thick cohesion. It never quite achieves the energy of the title track or Black Satin, but the chill factor is quite excellent nevertheless and ends On The Corner with a satisfactory feel, as if the music could simply play on and on toward the horizon and never really stop.



From start to finale, Davis set to recording a very very focused set of tracks here back in the early years of jazz-fusion, laying some musical foundations for future generations to work with in a variety of genres while still attempting to reach out to the young people of the 70's with a strong funk touch to his usual compositional approach. In all honesty, I think it's actually rather baffling that this album got such a cold shoulder back in '72 when it hit shelves: the rhythms are first-class, the playing is tightly wound and full of crash and the compositions themselves are well written. What more could you want?

For people just getting into Miles Davis, jazz cats, fellows who love their funk, and anyone who loves a hot beat that sounds fresh from the street, you can't go wrong with this seminal masterpiece. Merry Christmas MB!!
__________________
My Top 30 Albums of 2018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland
You can't blame the Jews for everything...just most things.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultHawk
Trump might be the best thing since free jazz.
Anteater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2009, 08:29 PM   #17 (permalink)
Master Of Muzak
 
Anteater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere swarthy
Posts: 3,974
Default

Cerrone – Cerrone 3: Supernature (1977)


"Disco from the Depths of The Screaming Space Time Continuums...With Flavor"

1. Supernature (10:20)
2. Sweet Drums (3:30)
3. In the Smoke (4:40)
4. Give Me Love (6:10)
5. Love Is Here (5:20)
6. Love Is the Answer (6:00)


For many of us, Disco is one of those genres that's generally far too obnoxious for its own good. Like much of today's club music, the genre was just a plain snoozefest; unlike the pseudo-electronic crap around today though, most Disco was more often than not just watered down funk with cleaner bass for the musically sedated masses, and hence had very little durability on the charts when the beginnings of what would become New Wave hit big in the late 1978 or so.

Still, even the most unimaginative profit mongering music categories generally have a couple of gems that get buried amidst the commercial garbage, records that were more than definitely accessible but had that little extra something to make them stand out, such as much of the early material of French musician and dancefloor maestro Cerrone. Incorporating psychedelic and space rock influences into poseur funk that thrived on mediocrity, the man's experimentation and his commercial ambitions eventually clicked together in 1977 with the release of his third album Supernature, and thus his reputation as an artist became solid.

"But what makes Supernature so good?" you might say. Well, whereas most disco is boring and dated, full of cheesy horns and a general lack of energy, this work seethes, grooves, and perhaps best of all is actually varied in content; although the 10-minute opening title track is quite the hypnotic club number, tracks such as 'In The Smoke' provide a spacey quietness that has more in common with Pink Floyd than Earth, Wind & Fire, while 'Give Me Love' has a razor sharp jazz-funk bent, emphasizing some fantastic drumming and guitar rather than the pulse of a club beat.





Another fun fact is that this is actually a concept album, mostly told through the title track and based around the story of animal-human mutants who are created by science to put an end to world hunger, but end up rebelling against their creators. Pretty camp, but nevertheless a nice touch to an album that already sounds leagues better than 99% of the disco that came out in the mid to late 70's.

So for those of you afraid of anything with the word "disco" attached to it, fear no longer -- this is one of those things you'll want to get your paws around and your ears on standby for. Thirty some odd years later, Supernature can still bust a move where it counts, and that's what makes it grand. Bon appétit!
__________________
My Top 30 Albums of 2018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland
You can't blame the Jews for everything...just most things.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultHawk
Trump might be the best thing since free jazz.
Anteater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2009, 10:25 PM   #18 (permalink)
Blue Bleezin' Blind Drunk
 
NumberNineDream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The land of the largest wine glass (aka Lebanon)
Posts: 2,183
Default

Didn't like much of the first track, but the second surely made her mark.

Tho when you said disco is like watered down funk with cleaner bass, I wonder why would anyone mess with the bass in funk music, isn't that the best part?

Anyway, nothing bad with giving disco a chance once in a while, and I think this one succeeded in impressing me.
Thumbs up (x7) I guess.
__________________
Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?

NumberNineDream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2009, 10:34 PM   #19 (permalink)
Master Of Muzak
 
Anteater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere swarthy
Posts: 3,974
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NumberNineDream View Post
Tho when you said disco is like watered down funk with cleaner bass, I wonder why would anyone mess with the bass in funk music, isn't that the best part?
The bass is certainly the best part, but as most folks have trouble with anything that isn't in 4/4 time or squeaky clean out of a studio, it was important that all the grit be squeezed out of Funk so that white folks with a bit too much time on their hands could go boogie on Saturday nights without wondering why they weren't listening to something like the Beejees.

Also, disco WAS part of the 70's, so in accordance with this review thread's mojo I decided to review something that might be interesting to people who hate the genre.
__________________
My Top 30 Albums of 2018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland
You can't blame the Jews for everything...just most things.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultHawk
Trump might be the best thing since free jazz.
Anteater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2009, 10:56 PM   #20 (permalink)
Blue Bleezin' Blind Drunk
 
NumberNineDream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The land of the largest wine glass (aka Lebanon)
Posts: 2,183
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anteater View Post

Also, disco WAS part of the 70's, so in accordance with this review thread's mojo I decided to review something that might be interesting to people who hate the genre.
I was expecting a Disco entry from the opening post, it made me kind of excited to see what you had up your sleeve.

Listening to the Odgipig album for the first time, at the moment. Just top-notch material, all together.
__________________
Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats?Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats? Do bats eat cats?

NumberNineDream is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.