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Old 11-19-2010, 02:55 AM   #331 (permalink)
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I've been mulling this over and am coming up blank. What is the literary counterpart - stuff like Poe, Lovecraft, etc.? If I were writing it I think I would look at the development over time. Why are you excluding that trope?
I'm actually reconsidering that as my topic. I first dismissed it based on a few articles I'd read that attempted to describe this music, name dropping, brief history, etc. So, I thought I'd leave that alone.
Now, however, I realize it wasn't given the proper attention it deserved. One article actually said the lead singer/songwriter for 16HP and WH was Eugene Oliver Davis, or something far off like that. Most articles leave out so much. They usually start with Nick Cave or 16 Horsepower but I believe it goes so much further. Unfortunetly, I'm running out of time, so I hope to not fall into the same trap as others attempting this.

I'd say the closest literary counterpart are those authors plus quite a few more. Faulkner, O'Connor, Crews, McCarthy, too name a few (because those are the books sitting in front of me). Nick Cave has two books, which I haven't read yet. Jay Munly has even written one (two?) but, I can't find a copy anywhere.
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Old 11-19-2010, 02:58 AM   #332 (permalink)
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[QUOTE=Keigh;957086]Interesting thread. I immediately thought of Tarnation. They were on 4AD back in the day with Cocteau Twins, Throwing Muses, Belly and Dead Can Dance.

I had forgotten about Tarnation. Thanks for digging that up.
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Old 11-19-2010, 09:48 AM   #333 (permalink)
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I read something once about Johnny Cash being gangsta 'cause of lyrics like "I shot a man in Reno , just to watch him die...." but that notion goes way, way back with old songs like Knoxville Girl. A Truer Sound (blog) posted a murder ballads comp a while back. If it's not available anymore let me know and I'll send it to you. A wonderful, scholarly site, Old Weird America, is an in-depth analysis of Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music. Plenty of historical fodder there. Gee, I'm starting to miss grad school!
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Old 11-19-2010, 02:24 PM   #334 (permalink)
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I read something once about Johnny Cash being gangsta 'cause of lyrics like "I shot a man in Reno , just to watch him die...." but that notion goes way, way back with old songs like Knoxville Girl. A Truer Sound (blog) posted a murder ballads comp a while back. If it's not available anymore let me know and I'll send it to you. A wonderful, scholarly site, Old Weird America, is an in-depth analysis of Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music. Plenty of historical fodder there. Gee, I'm starting to miss grad school!
Old country blues songs were talking about murder long before hip-hop came around, I agree. If anything, gangsta rap is just a continuation of some of those old blues songs from Blind Willie McTell, Johnson, etc.

A Truer Sound still had the comp. I have most of those songs but some I don't, what a treat!

The Anthology of American Folk Music is great, I dl it a while back but only listened to a bit, but loved it.

Has anyone listened to "The Executioner's Last Song: Vol. 1-3"? It's a John Langford project, filed under John Langford & The Pine Valley Cosmonauts. The first song is a rendition of "Knoxville Girl". Steave Earles version of "Tom Dooley" is a must listen. If I had a better connection with the interweb, I'd upload it and provide a link.
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Old 11-19-2010, 06:01 PM   #335 (permalink)
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Old country blues songs were talking about murder long before hip-hop came around, I agree. If anything, gangsta rap is just a continuation of some of those old blues songs from Blind Willie McTell, Johnson, etc.
Have the Jon Langfords, but had forgotten - good call.

I really enjoyed a book called The Sound Of The City: The Rise Of Rock And Roll by Charles Gillett. He starts at the beginning of recorded music (if I remember correctly) and makes the connection between the old blues and Jimmy Rogers, whom is considered by many to be the start of country (along with the Carter Family).

Even apparently sweet songs such as "You are my sunshine" contained the following : "But if you leave me To love another You'll regret it all some day"

I'd really like to read your work when you get done!
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Old 11-19-2010, 06:29 PM   #336 (permalink)
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Oh, and Any Major Dude With Half A Heart just posted part 5 of a series on murder ballads.
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Old 11-20-2010, 03:48 AM   #337 (permalink)
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Oh, and Any Major Dude With Half A Heart just posted part 5 of a series on murder ballads.
Checking it out now.

I'll consider posting a link or something once I'm done, but it all depends on how satisfied I am with the finale and who knows how long that will be.
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Old 11-23-2010, 02:38 PM   #338 (permalink)
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Well children,
I finally sat down and watched Col. J.D. Wilkes "Seven Signs" last night. It's taken so long to find it, without buying it (because I'm poor). I missed it when it came to PDX, I think I had a gig or something.

Anyone else seen it? I personally like it better than "Searching For The Wrong-Eyed Jesus". It rang truer to me, the characters more life-like. "Searching..." seemed to focus on the darker, grotesque parts of the south and seemed to leave so much out. It was done by BBC through Jim Whites memories of his south. And anyone from the south knows, it's all their own southern perspective that rules them. There isn't ONE southern experience or perspective or definition.
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Old 11-29-2010, 11:52 AM   #339 (permalink)
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Sorry, haven't seen either film. Where did you find them?
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Old 11-29-2010, 02:55 PM   #340 (permalink)
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Sorry, haven't seen either film. Where did you find them?
"Searching For The Wrong Eyed Jesus" can be found pretty much anywhere; Netflix, local video store or even the library. It was done by BBC.

"Seven Signs" is harder to locate. It's not in any database listed above so, I had to dl it from a site I stumbled upon.
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