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Old 12-02-2010, 10:46 PM   #341 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by LoathsomePete View Post
Just wondering if anyone else on this forum is a fan of the growing "Gothic Country" trend that's been emerging since the early 2000s.
I am! I am! I started getting into it in '95 when I heard Tarnation's second album, Gentle Creatures, on 4AD. I was a major 4AD fan at the time and bought everything on the label. I'd grown up listening to classic country and countrypolitan on my mom's AM radio stations (Patsy, Johnny, Loretta, etc), and I like some folk music...so getting into Tarnation wasn't a far stretch for me. In 1998, I saw Neko Case open for Nick Cave. The next day, I went out and bought Furnace Room Lullabye, put it in my car stereo...and it didn't leave my stereo for another 6 months. A few years later, Cave toured with Sixteen Horsepower who knocked my socks off when I saw them live. A few months after that, Sixteen Horsepower and Neko Case opened for Calexico in LA and I loved all of it. I need to start catching up with more of the Colorado stuff - Jay Munly, Slim Cessna, etc. I'm always looking for new alt-country/goth-Americana stuff. I'm also curious to know if anyone here has any opinions on the now-defunct Trailer Bride?
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Old 12-03-2010, 12:37 AM   #342 (permalink)
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Okay children,

My research paper is addressing a statement I read from a blog about the Denver, CO music scene. The title of the article is "The “Denver Sound,” long dead, makes room for lighter, noisier, funner genres in the scene".

I'm doing a quick investigation on whether or not the Denver Sound is truly dead. I'm spending quite a bit of time writing about how it's not just in Denver, though it arguablly started there. I have the majority of the article done, but feel it needs a bit more meat.

So... What say you folks? Do you think it (Denver Sound, Gothic Americana and the like) is dead, dying or thriving? Why do you think so?

I might include you in my article with your name as it appears here if I like what you say.

I hope you all will involve your thoughts and opinions.

-You can send a PM, if you are so inclined, with links to articles and what not you think could be helpful.
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Old 12-03-2010, 01:12 AM   #343 (permalink)
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Okay children,

My research paper is addressing a statement I read from a blog about the Denver, CO music scene. The title of the article is "The “Denver Sound,” long dead, makes room for lighter, noisier, funner genres in the scene".
Guess I've been snoozing under a rock. I had no idea there was a "Denver Sound". So, apparently, that's where a lot of this music that we like sprung from?

TurtleGirl - Calexico are awesome. Must've been quite a night with that line up.
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Old 12-03-2010, 01:13 AM   #344 (permalink)
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Oops, Thirties Girl.
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Old 12-03-2010, 02:34 AM   #345 (permalink)
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Okay children,

My research paper is addressing a statement I read from a blog about the Denver, CO music scene. The title of the article is "The “Denver Sound,” long dead, makes room for lighter, noisier, funner genres in the scene".

I'm doing a quick investigation on whether or not the Denver Sound is truly dead. I'm spending quite a bit of time writing about how it's not just in Denver, though it arguablly started there. I have the majority of the article done, but feel it needs a bit more meat.
I'm curious to know how you think the "Denver sound" differs from other alt-country/Americana artists in general. The Mekons, one of the first bands to dabble with the alt-country sound in the '80s, were from the UK. Mainman Jon Langford took the alt-country sound even further with his solo work and his group the Waco Brothers, who have been recording in Chicago since 1995. Mekons member Sally Timms also released an alt-country album in '98. The Cowboy Junkies, another early contender in the alt-country scene (although obviously not so much any more), started recording in 1985 in Canada. Tarnation, who started recording in '93, were from San Francisco. The Be Good Tanyas and Jolie Holland are also from the Bay Area (although one could argue, I suppose, that the Tanyas and Holland are really more part of the new-grass scene than alt-country). Trailer Bride, another early contender in the goth-country scene, started making music in North Carolina in '93.

...Point being, I think the alt-country thing has been going on for a while in other places before some of the bands in Denver who are currently dominating the scene started making music, and I'm curious to know how you think the Denver sound differs from those other bands. In some cases, the Denver bands might sound a bit more "old timey" and authentic, but not by much.
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Old 12-03-2010, 04:06 AM   #346 (permalink)
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...Point being, I think the alt-country thing has been going on for a while in other places before some of the bands in Denver who are currently dominating the scene started making music, and I'm curious to know how you think the Denver sound differs from those other bands. In some cases, the Denver bands might sound a bit more "old timey" and authentic, but not by much.
In my opinion, and quite a few others I believe, the "Denver Sound" differs because it's much darker in sound and yes, it tends to have a bit more "old timey" feel to it, especially due to the instruments used.

Alt. Country, I agree, has been around since Gram Parsons, who is considered the pioneer by most critics.

If you take 16 HP, WH, SCAC and Munly and put them next to any other alt. country artist or band, they stand out quite a bit. It always seemed to be like Southern Gothic writings of O'Connor, Faukner, Crews, McCarthy and others put to music. The bands mentioned plus Devotchka, Taratella and The Kalamath Brothers all have members that spent time within the ranks of one band, The Denver Gentlemen. I think because so many of these artists spent time in TDG then started another band, all these bands popped up at the same time with similar sounds or styles or instruments or whatever. All these bands helped put Denver on the musical map, thus the "Denver Sound" came about because before these bands, what music came out of Denver or Colorado in such mass quanity and quality?

I also believe that most, not all, alt. country derives directly from "Outlaw Country" of the 60's and 70's with punk rock influences added in. Most artists within this genre will tell you that's what they listened to as kids.

But, where alt. country artists will tell you during their teenage years they listened to a lot of punk or rock, these Dark Roots/Gothic Americana artists will mention a few goth bands, post punk bands and possibly some no wave.

Of course, none of this is completely accurate. You can't pinpoint a genre to it's specifics and excpect everyone to fall under the descriptions.

I'm really just making this up as I go.
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Old 12-03-2010, 09:56 AM   #347 (permalink)
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As long as Jay Munly is still around making music the Denver Sound will never truly be dead, however it definitely isn't the mecca for Gothic Country that it once was. That's not to say that the sound is dying because there are artists from all over the country and abroad that play the style, and it's a pretty good mix of urban and rural bands too.

Thirtiesgirl, this is an example of the type of music we are talking about:

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Old 12-03-2010, 07:13 PM   #348 (permalink)
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In my opinion, and quite a few others I believe, the "Denver Sound" differs because it's much darker in sound and yes, it tends to have a bit more "old timey" feel to it, especially due to the instruments used.
I would agree that most of what I've heard from the Denver bands is darker.

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Alt. Country, I agree, has been around since Gram Parsons, who is considered the pioneer by most critics.
No disagreement there.

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If you take 16 HP, WH, SCAC and Munly and put them next to any other alt. country artist or band, they stand out quite a bit.
Agreed, again. Among my collection of alt-country music, these are some of my favorites, including Devotchka.

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Originally Posted by oldcrowprophet View Post
I also believe that most, not all, alt. country derives directly from "Outlaw Country" of the 60's and 70's with punk rock influences added in. Most artists within this genre will tell you that's what they listened to as kids.
Ah, must do more research, then. I'm not too aware of music that far back.

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Thirtiesgirl, this is an example of the type of music we are talking about:

Thanks, yes, I know. That's one of my favorite Munly tracks.
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:14 AM   #349 (permalink)
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Your mix tapes a just great. I think they are the most useful introductions to this music I have come across. I really want to thank you for this. You have made a difference in my life. thanks
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Old 01-08-2011, 04:19 PM   #350 (permalink)
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Haa haa.

Link for you and Terrible Lizard PMed.
I would love that link too, please!
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