Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > Rock & Metal > Prog & Psychedelic Rock
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-12-2016, 02:09 PM   #31 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 17
Default

If your into UK 70s/80s-sound folkrock you should look into Holland during that period.
You'd be surprized. And you'd be hard-pressed to tell the difference.
The vocals in English are perfect.

Not folkprog (that is a VERY slim line) ,but folkrock.




....
80s-on you have what was known as wyrdfolk.
Many, many bands.
Buffo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2016, 06:54 AM   #32 (permalink)
Born To Be Mild
 
Lisnaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: He lives on Love Street
Posts: 3,099
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan View Post
Fuchsia there is so much to say about the music I don't know where to begin. It was recorded in the transition years between Psychedelia to Progressive Rock, and it seems where it has a foot in each. There are times they remind me of Genesis, and other times like ELO.

Fuchsia - Gone With The Mouse
^ An little-known band and an interesting, complex song, Neapolitan. It's the kind of song that requires a few listens I think, so I'll be coming back to play it again.Thanks.

It seems pretty clear that Fuchsia take their name from one of the characters in that sprawling, wordy classic of gothic fiction, the Gormenghast trilogy. If anyone is in doubt, check out the cover of this paperback edition of the first novel, Titus Groan, which shows the author's own drawing of Fuchsia:-

Spoiler for big pic of the original Fuchsia:


So this a good place to mention the band that actually called themselves Titus Groan and who, by coincidence, are kind of prog-folky too. This is one of the better tracks off their album, and the song title refers to a part of the enormous Gormenghast castle in which M Peake's novels are set.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Psy-Fi View Post
Here are a couple of groups that haven't been posted yet. Perhaps a bit more rock oriented, but there are enough folk and prog elements in both bands to include them here (IMO)...



^ I haven't Heard the name Fotheringay in years, Psy-Fi ! That video clip is a real time capsule back to the style of so many English bands in the seventies; so serious about getting their music right, so uninterested in putting on a show of any kind.

As for Curved Air, I used to love their Vivaldi tracks, but I'm not sure if they really count as Prog Folk. Unless you can demonstrate otherwise, I'm afraid I'll have to report you to a mod for going off topic!
__________________
Did you ever hear of having more than you wanted? So that you couldn’t want anything else and then started looking for something else to want? It seems like we’re always searching for something to satisfy us, and never finding it. - Susan Eloise Hinton, 1967
Lisnaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2016, 08:48 AM   #33 (permalink)
Aficionado of Fine Filth
 
Psy-Fi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: You don't want to look in there.
Posts: 3,909
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisnaholic View Post
I haven't Heard the name Fotheringay in years, Psy-Fi ! That video clip is a real time capsule back to the style of so many English bands in the seventies; so serious about getting their music right, so uninterested in putting on a show of any kind.

As for Curved Air, I used to love their Vivaldi tracks, but I'm not sure if they really count as Prog Folk. Unless you can demonstrate otherwise, I'm afraid I'll have to report you to a mod for going off topic!
I almost deleted the Curved Air video, shortly after posting it, because I thought it might not qualify as Prog/Folk.

I plead temporary insanity.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by WWWP View Post
Welcome to the new mb. A haven for straight white depressive snowflakes playacting as anarchists.


She's a Brick House
Psy-Fi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2016, 11:45 AM   #34 (permalink)
Born To Be Mild
 
Lisnaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: He lives on Love Street
Posts: 3,099
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psy-Fi View Post
I plead temporary insanity.
^ OK, we can let it go this time...


Anyway, John Barleycorn is a well-known album that's often considered to be prog folk. TBH, it's never felt that way to me. It's an album of rock edging towards jazz and it just happens to latch on to a folk song for it's title track:-



Mice and Rats in the Loft is more prog than folk. At the time of its release the album was pretty much ignored, but it's now becoming a cult classic thanks to the internet. Well, it's convinced me! There's lots of musical invention on the album's three tracks; lots of acoustic guitar, strings and I don't know what else. See if this 18-minuter doesn't hold your attention from start to finish as it did with me:-

__________________
Did you ever hear of having more than you wanted? So that you couldn’t want anything else and then started looking for something else to want? It seems like we’re always searching for something to satisfy us, and never finding it. - Susan Eloise Hinton, 1967
Lisnaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 10:21 AM   #35 (permalink)
Groupie
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 17
Default

Their other lp, "Sorcerors", is terrible boring though.
Buffo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 03:47 PM   #36 (permalink)
ComputerHabenHerzschmerz
 
Neapolitan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Les Barricades Mystérieuses
Posts: 6,544
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisnaholic View Post
^ OK, we can let it go this time...


Anyway, John Barleycorn is a well-known album that's often considered to be prog folk. TBH, it's never felt that way to me. It's an album of rock edging towards jazz and it just happens to latch on to a folk song for it's title track:-


Traffic is one of my favorite bands. I was going to bring them up not so much as a full fledged Folk-Prog band, but a band who occasionally writes a song in the Acid Folk/Prog Folk style. Chris Wood was the one who was into Jazz, Classical and English Folk, so from my point of view I see John Barelycorn Must Die as an example of one of Chris' many electric interest.

Besides not being called a Prog Folk band, I really haven't seen Traffic described by any one as Progressive Rock, even though their exploration into other music areas is just as strong as other Prog bands. Maybe the reasons for this is that started in the Psychedelia era and then later tend to have a stronger Jazz & R&B influence. I'm not too hung up on tagging bands by genres, because a lot of time they cover a wide range of styles. I much prefer what the artists think of their music. Pentangle called their music "Thirteenth Century Rock and Roll," and Traffic called their music the "Headless Horseman Sound."

Traffic - Hidden Treasure


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisnaholic View Post
^ An little-known band and an interesting, complex song, Neapolitan. It's the kind of song that requires a few listens I think, so I'll be coming back to play it again.Thanks.

It seems pretty clear that Fuchsia take their name from one of the characters in that sprawling, wordy classic of gothic fiction, the Gormenghast trilogy. If anyone is in doubt, check out the cover of this paperback edition of the first novel, Titus Groan, which shows the author's own drawing of Fuchsia:-

Spoiler for big pic of the original Fuchsia:


So this a good place to mention the band that actually called themselves Titus Groan and who, by coincidence, are kind of prog-folky too. This is one of the better tracks off their album, and the song title refers to a part of the enormous Gormenghast castle in which M Peake's novels are set.





^ I haven't Heard the name Fotheringay in years, Psy-Fi ! That video clip is a real time capsule back to the style of so many English bands in the seventies; so serious about getting their music right, so uninterested in putting on a show of any kind.

As for Curved Air, I used to love their Vivaldi tracks, but I'm not sure if they really count as Prog Folk. Unless you can demonstrate otherwise, I'm afraid I'll have to report you to a mod for going off topic!
Thanks for not totally dismiss it and giving it another try. The lyrics of Fuschia reminds me something between the Psychedelic songs Dave Mason wrote in Traffic and Syd Barrett writing and singing style. Fuschia's music has a sound that is sometimes like Genesis and other times like ELO.

Other book related songs in Acid Folk/Prog Folk would be Aslan (C.S. Lewis) and Magician in the Mountain (J. R. R. Tolkien).

Caedmon - Aslan


There are two bass players that are credit on the album The Sound Of Sunforest, Joe Mudele and Herbie Flowers. The latter played bass for David Bowie and Lou Reed, and played bass on Walk on the Wild Side ... believe it or not. Herbie Flowers was only paid £17 for his contribution on the song. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Sunforest - Magician In The Mountain


That whole magician in a mountain theme is taken up again with the Tree's song Murdoch - one of my all time favorite Prog Folk songs. The guitar playing reminded me of the Outlaws, and I sometimes wonder if Mutt Lange owned this album, a steered the Outlaws in that direction ... or maybe they were influenced by the same bands. The Trees were influenced by the San Fransisco Acid Rock groups as well of course English bands like Pentangle.

Trees - Murdoch
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhanteimi View Post
Actually, I like you a lot, Nea. That's why I treat you like ****. It's the MB way.

"it counts in our hearts" - ʕººʔ
“I have nothing to offer anybody, except my own confusion.” ― Jack Kerouac.
“If one listens to the wrong kind of music, he will become the wrong kind of person.” – Aristotle.
"If you tried to give Rock and Roll another name, you might call it 'Chuck Berry'." - John Lennon
"I look for ambiguity when I'm writing because life is ambiguous." — Keith Richards ☮ 💖 ♫ ∞ ἰχθύς
Neapolitan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 03:38 PM   #37 (permalink)
Born To Be Mild
 
Lisnaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: He lives on Love Street
Posts: 3,099
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan View Post
Besides not being called a Prog Folk band, I really haven't seen Traffic described by any one as Progressive Rock, even though their exploration into other music areas is just as strong as other Prog bands. Maybe the reasons for this is that started in the Psychedelia era and then later tend to have a stronger Jazz & R&B influence. I'm not too hung up on tagging bands by genres, because a lot of time they cover a wide range of styles. I much prefer what the artists think of their music. Pentangle called their music "Thirteenth Century Rock and Roll," and Traffic called their music the "Headless Horseman Sound."
^"Headless Horseman Sound" is a suitably psychedelic description all right! I agree, that labelling John Barleycorn as Prog Folk is pretty misleading. Low Spark is a good album, though my stand-out fave is the title track, rather than Hidden Treasure.

Quote:
Other book related songs in Acid Folk/Prog Folk would be Aslan (C.S. Lewis) and Magician in the Mountain (J. R. R. Tolkien).

Caedmon - Aslan


There are two bass players that are credit on the album The Sound Of Sunforest, Joe Mudele and Herbie Flowers. The latter played bass for David Bowie and Lou Reed, and played bass on Walk on the Wild Side ... believe it or not. Herbie Flowers was only paid £17 for his contribution on the song. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Sunforest - Magician In The Mountain
^ I didn't expect "Book-related Acid/Prog Folk" to turn into a sub-sub-sub genre, but so it appears to be! My first impression is that they shared a nice line in album-cover art, but I haven't been won over by the music yet. I really liked the Caedemon song because of its elec guitar, though that touch seems to be the exception for Caedemon rather than the rule.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan View Post
Still looking bands in the Acid Folk/Prog Folk vein, among other genres. Here's a random band. I don't know, you might like this band, with a name like "King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard" how can you go wrong? Judging by the album cover it look like it's straight from 1970, but they actually released the album last year.

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard - Quarters! (2015)
^ Yes, That's a great name, and ditto pastiche album cover! I'll give them a proper listen soon, along with Sunforest.
I'm also looking for music to keep this thread going, though I don't have any new material to offer just now. Instead, in the pedantic way I have, I'm dredging up an old link, in this case because you mentioned Pentangle:-

http://www.musicbanter.com/country-f...pentangle.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffo View Post
Their other lp, "Sorcerors", is terrible boring though.
^ This is a little-known piece of information that I wouldn't disagree with, although the title track at least has slowly grown on me.
__________________
Did you ever hear of having more than you wanted? So that you couldn’t want anything else and then started looking for something else to want? It seems like we’re always searching for something to satisfy us, and never finding it. - Susan Eloise Hinton, 1967
Lisnaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:59 PM   #38 (permalink)
ComputerHabenHerzschmerz
 
Neapolitan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Les Barricades Mystérieuses
Posts: 6,544
Default

Sunforest does a variety of music styles, has more of a feel-good Pop sound. King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard does a variety of styles - Garage, Psychedelia, and early RnR styles. They probably use more reverb than was employed back in the 60s. I haven't heard a lot of Caedmon, but I really like the song Aslan.

I discovered Bermuda Triangle about a month ago, but haven't really delve into them much. The band consists of Roger and Wendy Penney. Roger plays an auto-harp, which is more likely to be found in Old Timey and early Country music. Wendy plays bass. She has an unique & sophisticated approach to playing. I think she is pretty good at it. With the high pitch/range "ethereal" vocals and auto-harp, they have more of a acoustic Folk sound than a Prog Folk sound. And yes, that is a cover version of Aerosmith - Dream On.

Bermuda Triangle-Lost Worlds-Late 60's

BERMUDA TRIANGLE ~ Dream On
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhanteimi View Post
Actually, I like you a lot, Nea. That's why I treat you like ****. It's the MB way.

"it counts in our hearts" - ʕººʔ
“I have nothing to offer anybody, except my own confusion.” ― Jack Kerouac.
“If one listens to the wrong kind of music, he will become the wrong kind of person.” – Aristotle.
"If you tried to give Rock and Roll another name, you might call it 'Chuck Berry'." - John Lennon
"I look for ambiguity when I'm writing because life is ambiguous." — Keith Richards ☮ 💖 ♫ ∞ ἰχθύς
Neapolitan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2016, 07:00 PM   #39 (permalink)
Born To Be Mild
 
Lisnaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: He lives on Love Street
Posts: 3,099
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan View Post
There are two bass players that are credit on the album The Sound Of Sunforest, Joe Mudele and Herbie Flowers. The latter played bass for David Bowie and Lou Reed, and played bass on Walk on the Wild Side ... believe it or not. Herbie Flowers was only paid £17 for his contribution on the song. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
It was only when I reread your post that it struck me how unexpected it is that Sunforest and Lou Reed should have a musician in common.

Right now I'm exploring the discography of Renaissance, who in their earliest incarnation, had all the prog elements you could wish for:-



For me at least, there was a surprising connection too; the band was formed by none other than Keith Relf, distinctive frontman of the Yardbirds, with his former bandmate Jim McCarty. The girl with the tambourine is Keith's sister, Jane and the keyboard player with glasses was John Hawken, who arrived from The Nashville Teens and who would later move on to The Strawbs.



P.S. My favourite Renaissance lyric so far, more Beefheart than prog folk, is:-

................................................. Black mambo bamboo business on a red sun night.
__________________
Did you ever hear of having more than you wanted? So that you couldn’t want anything else and then started looking for something else to want? It seems like we’re always searching for something to satisfy us, and never finding it. - Susan Eloise Hinton, 1967

Last edited by Lisnaholic; 05-31-2016 at 07:48 AM.
Lisnaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.