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Old 06-21-2010, 12:46 PM   #11 (permalink)
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I love this theme!

One of my all time favourite Rock N Roll records....


Going a bit Rockabilly, one of the first (popular) female artists...


And again, a favourite...
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Old 06-21-2010, 12:52 PM   #12 (permalink)
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To those worth selections I add my own terrifying trio of early R&B & rockabilly anthems:

Johnny Burnette's take-no-prisoners cover of the rockabilly classic The Train Kept A Rollin':



Johnny Otis' funky R&B masterpiece Wilie and the Hand Jive:



And Freddy Slack's laid back rendition of Down the Road Apiece with his own countrified brand of boogie woogie. Some rock historian believe that Down the Road Apiece is the first rock and roll song. More on that topic follows:




There's been a long standing debate among rock and roll historians as to what the first rock & roll song really was. Among the most frequently mentioned songs on the short list are:
  • Down the Road Apiece by Freddy Slack & the Will Bradley Trio (1940)
  • The Honeydripper by Joe Liggins (1945)
  • I Can't Be Satisfied by Muddy Waters (1947)
  • Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee by Stick McGhee (1949)
  • The Fat Man by Fats Domino (1949)
  • Sixty Minute Man by the Dominoes (1950)
  • Rocket 88 by Jackie Brenston (aka Ike Turner) and His Delta Cats (1951)
  • Hound Dog by Big Mama Thorton & the Johnny Otis Band (1952)
  • Shake, Rattle and Roll by Big Joe Turner (1954)
  • Rock Around the Clock by Bill Haley and the Comets (1954)
  • That's All Right Mama by Elvis Presley (1954)
  • I Got A Woman by Ray Charles (1954)
  • Bo Diddley by Bo Diddley (1955)
  • Maybellene by Chuck Berry (1955)
  • Blue Suede Shoes by Carl Perkins (1955)
  • Tutti Frutti by Little Richard (1955)

Early on, both country music and R&B artists were doing their own version of of boogie woogie music but the first rock and roll song depends on your own perspective of when the boogie woogie swing music ended and the real rock and roll began. By 1956, rock and roll was here to stay as a separate and distinct genre with a fan base and market all of it's own.
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Old 06-23-2010, 04:47 AM   #13 (permalink)
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A few favourites of mine...





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Old 06-24-2010, 02:21 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Old 06-24-2010, 02:32 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldog View Post

What a win. Also one of my favourites.
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Old 06-26-2010, 07:38 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers from Harlem in NYC were one of the first R&B singing groups. Frankie Lymon was only 13 years old when Why Do Fools Fall In Love hit number 1 on the American music charts.

Barry Gordy modelled his entire Motown sound around the early hits of Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers. The Motown supergroup, the Jackson 5 was a virtual recreation of the early Lymon sound, merely updated. Lymon faded after the Teenagers split into two factions in early 1958, 18 months after Why Do Fools Fall In Love hit the charts. Lymon's attempted to build a second career as an adult R&B singer but he died at age 26 of a heroin overdose in 1968.

This remastered version of the song sounds fantastic. I think Frankie had every bit as much talent as a vocalist as Michael Jackson but most of the rock and roll stars in the 1950s faded away after a couple years on the top. Young black rock & roll stars didn't have career mentors until producers like Smokey Robinson, Barry Gordy and Curtis Mayfield came along in the early Sixties.

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