Classic Albums I have never heard - Music Banter Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The MB Reader > Members Journal
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-27-2013, 10:12 AM   #201 (permalink)
Zum Henker Defätist!!
 
The Batlord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Beating GNR at DDR and keying Axl's new car
Posts: 48,215
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trollheart View Post
Ah, no thanks. I don't for a minute think that's anything like a fair representation of their sound, which to me is nothing special. In fact, I won't be thinking of them at all.

See, this is what I meant when I asked at the OP for people not to start shouting at me saying "How can you not like that? It's a classic!" Eye of the beholder, man. Or ear, in this case. Takes all kinds.
Actually it is. Cobain was basically a pop songwriter in the vein of the Beatles and the Kinks, he was a Pixies fanatic, and the whole grunge sound basically came from Black Flag's My War album which was hardcore punk directly influenced by Black Sabbath. So Unknown is spot on.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by J.R.R. Tolkien
There is only one bright spot and that is the growing habit of disgruntled men of dynamiting factories and power-stations; I hope that, encouraged now as ‘patriotism’, may remain a habit! But it won’t do any good, if it is not universal.
The Batlord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2013, 01:10 PM   #202 (permalink)
watching the wheels
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Finland
Posts: 470
Default

Nirvana was basically just a solid pop band that played loud. At least, on Nevermind. Bleach and In Utero are more edgier. Having said that, Nevermind is, in my opinion, one of the best albums from the nineties, but then again,I really know nothing about music.

Nice journal, though. Even if I don't agree, I enjoyed it a lot.
__________________
...
Taxman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2013, 01:11 PM   #203 (permalink)
watching the wheels
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Finland
Posts: 470
Default

Oops. I just noticed I'm three months late...anyway.
__________________
...
Taxman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2014, 11:40 AM   #204 (permalink)
Born to be mild
 
Trollheart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: 404 Not Found
Posts: 26,952
Default

Okay then Briks and powerstars: you've had your fun but it's time for the return of the original and best. Accept no substitutes!

Title: Close to the edge
Artiste: Yes
Year: 1972
Chronological position: Fouth album
Previous experience of this artiste?: Mostly later stuff: “Big generator”, “Union”, “90125”, that sort of thing. I've always found seventies Yes overlong and meandering and boring...
Why is this considered a classic? I think it was the first time Yes had written an album with so few tracks and two of these being so long, and I guess it captured the zeitgeist of the seventies and prog in general. But I'm not convinced personally.

My thoughts
One minute (or thereabouts in) ---- Good, great, bad, meh, still waiting or other? Good but not blowing me away
One track in --- (Considering track one is over eighteen minutes long this would be a long time to wait to form some sort of impression, so I'll go for about five minutes into the title track) Good
Halfway through --- Great
Finished --- Great

Comments: You guys have been bugging me to listen to this almost as much as you did about Slayer, so here it is. I'm already on record as saying I don't like seventies Yes much but we'll see if this changes my mind. Nice soft opening with birdsong and nature sounds (you'd expect that of Jon Anderson I guess) then you can see where bands like Spock's Beard and IQ got their inspiration as the mammoth title track gets going. I hear guitar and bass phrases that would resurface a decade later on “90125”. Piano part at the tenth minute is really nice, but sort of the first time I've really sat up and taken notice so far. Seems to be part of Part III: I get up I get down? Superb organ solo from Wakeman. Now I'm interested.

Nice guitar opening to “And you and I”, very Steve Hackettish. I of course have always loved Anderson's voice, just something about earlier Yes albums has never quite clicked with me and I don't know why. Maybe it's because the stuff I heard from them so far was typically shorter and less convoluted than this. But then, I'm well known as a lover of long epic songs. So where does the problem lie? It's the same with IQ: they should be a band I'm totally into, and yet every time I listen to them I end up losing interest or occasionally falling asleep! This is turning out to be good, but I'm absolutely not blown away as everyone expected me to be, asking myself why didn't I listen to this twenty years ago or anything. Unless it gets amazing in the next short while I don't see myself listing it as one of my favourite prog albums, unlike it would seem ninety-nine percent of you.

Favourite track(s): Well there are only three so I can't really pick but Close to the edge III: I get up I get down, Close to the edge IV: Seasons of Man; And you and I is pretty solid all the way through and the last track is good too, so not much not to like other than
Least favourite track(s): Close to the edge I and II

Final impression --- Yeah really quite good but not the revelation I expected it to be, and if people think I'm going to be banging my head against a wall saying why didn't I listen to this sooner they'll be waiting. I certainly see why it's a classic but I don't see why it's considered THE classic??

Do I feel, at the end, A) I wish I had listened to this sooner
B) I'm sorry I bothered
C) I might end up liking this
D) Have to wait and see
E) Bit underwhelmed; was ok but a classic?
F) Definitely enjoyed it, but again would I consider it a classic?


Mixture of E and F I guess: hard to put into words. I do like it, I see it's a classic but it would not be top of my list, ever. The old problem with seventies Yes continues, it would seem.
__________________
Trollheart: Signature-free since April 2018
Trollheart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2014, 12:19 PM   #205 (permalink)
SOPHIE FOREVER
 
Frownland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: East of the Southern North American West
Posts: 35,548
Default

Glad you got around to listening to it, TH. I share the same feelings on the album in that it's great, but definitely not their best. When you say that you don't like 70s Yes, does that mean you've not heard Fragile, Tales From Topographic Oceans, and Relayer?
__________________
Studies show that when a given norm is changed in the face of the unchanging, the remaining contradictions will parallel the truth.

Frownland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2014, 02:50 PM   #206 (permalink)
carpe musicam
 
Neapolitan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Les Barricades Mystérieuses
Posts: 7,710
Default

Strange, I totally avoid “Big generator”, “Union”, “90125”, on purpose. 90125 grates my nerves to no end. Close to the Edge is an absolute classic. It's better than most of the 70s albums like The Wall, Quadropenia, maybe ties with Selling England by the Pound, better that Aqua Lung and and ever other hard Rock or Prog albums. Albums of 1972 CttC is better than Honky Château, Can't Buy a Thrill, Chicago V, and Obscured by Clouds. I think albums like Ziggy Stardust, and Exile on Main St. are objective just as great, I don't know how that Rolling Stone rag would rank them. Harvest, Foxtrot, near equal. Wow a year! You probably could have a whole journal dedicated to 1972!
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by mord View Post
Actually, I like you a lot, Nea. That's why I treat you like ****. It's the MB way.

"it counts in our hearts" ?ºº?
“I have nothing to offer anybody, except my own confusion.” Jack Kerouac.
“If one listens to the wrong kind of music, he will become the wrong kind of person.” Aristotle.
"If you tried to give Rock and Roll another name, you might call it 'Chuck Berry'." John Lennon
"I look for ambiguity when I'm writing because life is ambiguous." Keith Richards
Neapolitan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2014, 03:16 PM   #207 (permalink)
Born to be mild
 
Trollheart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: 404 Not Found
Posts: 26,952
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland View Post
Glad you got around to listening to it, TH. I share the same feelings on the album in that it's great, but definitely not their best. When you say that you don't like 70s Yes, does that mean you've not heard Fragile, Tales From Topographic Oceans, and Relayer?
TBH I have not heard any Yes 70s albums at all. I've seen them live (on TV) and was bored to tears. Of course that could stem from the fact I knew none of the material. But it just seemed to ramble on forever and I didn't like it. I may try some other albums --- oh wait, I have heard Drama --- no that's 80s isn't it? --- but for me the whole 80s/90s Yes was where I came to love their music, along with the totally underrated ABWH album.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neapolitan View Post
Strange, I totally avoid “Big generator”, “Union”, “90125”, on purpose. 90125 grates my nerves to no end. Close to the Edge is an absolute classic. It's better than most of the 70s albums like The Wall, Quadropenia, maybe ties with Selling England by the Pound, better that Aqua Lung and and ever other hard Rock or Prog albums. Albums of 1972 CttC is better than Honky Château, Can't Buy a Thrill, Chicago V, and Obscured by Clouds. I think albums like Ziggy Stardust, and Exile on Main St. are objective just as great, I don't know how that Rolling Stone rag would rank them. Harvest, Foxtrot, near equal. Wow a year! You probably could have a whole journal dedicated to 1972!
It's all relative as I say. I'm one of those who much prefers "Trespass", "Wind and wuthering" and even "Nursery cryme" to "Selling England." It's not my least favourite Genesis album but it's definitely not my favourite. That said, it's a great album. I just think I was disappointed, after the fanfare put up about "Close to the edge", that I expected to be totally smacked upside the head and I wasn't. It was a good, even a great Yes album but I'd still rather listen to "Big Generator", "Union" or "90125", maybe even "ABWH". It's just how I feel.
__________________
Trollheart: Signature-free since April 2018
Trollheart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2014, 04:13 PM   #208 (permalink)
Certified H00d Classic
 
Anteater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Bernie Sanders's yacht
Posts: 6,129
Default

What makes Close To The Edge special is not only the spontaneous process that went into its recording compared to Yes's other albums, but also the way its constructed and its relative brevity compared to other "prog" records of the era. There's so much going on in just those three songs, however, that people are still talking about it nearly half a century later. There's a reason why its been #1 on ProgArchives pretty much forever: it simply has that level of staying power for the majority of progheads.

That being said, I think you'd like 1971's Fragile or 1980's Drama more than Close To The Edge.
__________________
Anteater's 21 Fav Albums Of 2020

Anteater's Daily Tune Roulette

Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultHawk
I was called upon by the muses for greatness.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frownland
I'm bald, ja.
Anteater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2014, 04:37 PM   #209 (permalink)
Horribly Creative
 
Unknown Soldier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: London, The Big Smoke
Posts: 8,265
Default

The fact of the matter is that Close to the Edge needs several listens even by an experienced music listener to fully absorb what's on offer. Personally I think its better than anything comparable put out by the likes of Pink Floyd and Genesis.I'd also recommend reading several reviews about the album to give you a good lowdown on the album.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by eraser.time206 View Post
If you can't deal with the fact that there are 6+ billion people in the world and none of them think exactly the same that's not my problem. Just deal with it yourself or make actual conversation. This isn't a court and I'm not some poet or prophet that needs everything I say to be analytically critiqued.
Metal Wars

Power Metal

Pounding Decibels- A Hard and Heavy History
Unknown Soldier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2014, 05:19 PM   #210 (permalink)
Scuttle Buttin'
 
Moss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Boulder Colorado
Posts: 972
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unknown Soldier View Post
The fact of the matter is that Close to the Edge needs several listens even by an experienced music listener to fully absorb what's on offer. Personally I think its better than anything comparable put out by the likes of Pink Floyd and Genesis.I'd also recommend reading several reviews about the album to give you a good lowdown on the album.
I love it but it is in no way superior to Pink Floyd's Animals.
Moss is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2024 Advameg, Inc.