Music Banter

Go Back   Music Banter > The Music Forums > General Music
Register Blogging Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Welcome to Music Banter Forum! Make sure to register - it's free and very quick! You have to register before you can post and participate in our discussions with over 70,000 other registered members. After you create your free account, you will be able to customize many options, you will have the full access to over 1,100,000 posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-24-2006, 06:55 PM   #501 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Crowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 699
Default

Quote:
You didn`t say New Orleans had Ska , you said the U.S. did. Big difference.
A few immigrants in one city does not mean the U.S. can lay claim to it.
You have to remember the continental size of the US. Our Louisiana/Southern Mississippi is almost as big as your country. New Orleans is the biggest city in Louisiana. It is not the same as when Britain gets a new style of music - and the US does. We are a humongous country. And I said that the US (New Orleans being a part of the US, and I also pointed out specifically "our cajun country") had Ska first. We are closer to Jamaica, it's no wonder that we would get the immediate immigrants and subsequently the music scene.

Quote:
And please tell me where the credibility on my arguement on dance music fails.
I'm responding to like 2 -3 people per post, I wasn't referring to you in this case.
__________________
Crowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2006, 07:16 PM   #502 (permalink)
The Sexual Intellectual
 
Urban Hat€monger ?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Somewhere cooler than you
Posts: 18,449
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowe
You have to remember the continental size of the US. Our Louisiana/Southern Mississippi is almost as big as your country. New Orleans is the biggest city in Louisiana. It is not the same as when Britain gets a new style of music - and the US does. We are a humongous country. And I said that the US (New Orleans being a part of the US, and I also pointed out specifically "our cajun country") had Ska first. We are closer to Jamaica, it's no wonder that we would get the immediate immigrants and subsequently the music scene.
But if Ska did have any sort of impact in the U.S. there would be American ska bands in the late 60s & 70s , now i`m no expert on the genre but I can`t think of a single one.Those Jamaican immigrants in in New Orleans may have started there , but the fact remains they were born in Jamaica & returned there to record & play. And like I said , found success in the UK and spawned the genre there.

It`s pointless to bring up population all the time , Just because the U.S. is bigger. Do you know what the total number of album sales in the UK was last year?
It was 237 million

Total album sales in the U.S. last year - 666 million

Even despite the huge population difference the uk sells more than a third of the total number of album sales of the U.S. So in my book that means an artist only has to sell 3 albums in the U.S. for every one he sells in the U.K. to be a success over there.
__________________



Urb's RYM Stuff

Most people sell their soul to the devil, but the devil sells his soul to Nick Cave.
Urban Hat€monger ? is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2006, 07:30 PM   #503 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Crowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 699
Default

I wasn't merely speculating about population. At the time it would have been harder to spread new music around such a big area than it would your country. It's not opinion, that's fact... it's common logic. With the same hose it would take longer to fill a swimming pool up with water than it would a bathtub.

Album sales nowadays are not the definition of "success" - so it's not the same thing.

The genre was spawned in Jamaica due to American influence. America had ska before England in our cajun country. Ska found it's way across the pond and was popular in England. Ska came back to America - popular, and then America reworked it. And now ska is almost completely dominated by American bands.

There ya go. Ska.

I'm tired of this roundabout thread. Each of us have too much pride to allow any admittance or give any ground - it's pointless. That being said - I'm outta here. I'd be glad to talk about this sans competitive nature!
__________________
Crowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2006, 10:41 PM   #504 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,753
Default

No Doubt bringing ska to the forefront? Forefront of what, MTV & radio play? Did you forget about Madness?

I don't agree that Weezer's album was a quitessential 90s emo album. The 90s was repetitive and ****ty produced screamo bands and the last remains of decent hardcore that didn't have cheese metal riffs.

Boo Boo, those bands influenced a lot of the bands we talk about in the indie forum, but not so much emo bands. Most of that was supposed to be mid-late 80s hardcore punk bands.
__________________
hookers with machineguns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2006, 10:43 PM   #505 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,753
Default

And Sonic Youth and The Pixies aren't indie emo, I'm not sure what you were trying to say there.

Edit: It's also not fair to give the U.S. any credit (mention) for ska/reggae. It might have had a bigger market here before Britain, but c'mon. Let's not forget the REAL roots.
__________________
hookers with machineguns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 12:19 AM   #506 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Crowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 699
Default

Quote:
It's also not fair to give the U.S. any credit (mention) for ska/reggae. It might have had a bigger market here before Britain, but c'mon. Let's not forget the REAL roots.
Ska Officianados (authors, musical historians) have accredited Ska's birth as the Jamaican interpretation of American Jazz and Big Band music and Ska was born as a response to the American influences, so you're argument is with them. I haven't said anything about Reggae being started in the US.

Quote:
And Sonic Youth and The Pixies aren't indie emo, I'm not sure what you were trying to say there.
Sometimes I'm not very articulate. The Pixies were alternative. Sonic Youth was also alternative at the timie, but Daydream Nation - their best album - was generally accepted as an indie hit - and one of the best album's of the decade. Both of these bands had huge influences on the groups of today, and this is the stuff that influenced the playing styles of many emo groups and indie groups that we know. Because they grew up listening to it.

Alternative didn't mean the same back then as it does now. It was merely a term used to describe music that wasn't mainstream. Indie, before the populace bastardized it, and turned it into a genre... meant the same thing - but it took the place of alt because alt had turned into a genre.
__________________
Crowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 09:07 AM   #507 (permalink)
;)
 
cardboard adolescent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: CA
Posts: 3,502
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boo boo
No, but all the best post-punk bands were british.

All we had were Husker Du and The Minutemen.
Aaargh! That statement makes me cry!

Husker Du
Minutemen
Pere Ubu
Suicide
Mission of Burma
The entire No Wave scene
Sonic Youth
Big Black
Swans
Devo
The Cramps
Half Japanese

and probably more.

It's not that I'm denying that the British didn't have a ****load of amazing post-punk bands, but you just looked over a ton of my favorite bands, and I couldn't just let that go.
cardboard adolescent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 10:00 AM   #508 (permalink)
Music Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,753
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowe
Ska Officianados (authors, musical historians) have accredited Ska's birth as the Jamaican interpretation of American Jazz and Big Band music and Ska was born as a response to the American influences, so you're argument is with them. I haven't said anything about Reggae being started in the US.
We're talking about ska and reggae though, not jazz. I agree with what the historians (?) or whatever say, but the Americans still shouldn't take any mentionable credit for that music in this thread, that's my opinion. It is kind of interesting though, one of the most influential bands, The Specials, is from Britain. Most of the U.S. third wave pisses me off, but there are a few select bands that keep it traditional, that's all I care about.

Quote:
Sometimes I'm not very articulate. The Pixies were alternative. Sonic Youth was also alternative at the timie, but Daydream Nation - their best album - was generally accepted as an indie hit - and one of the best album's of the decade. Both of these bands had huge influences on the groups of today, and this is the stuff that influenced the playing styles of many emo groups and indie groups that we know. Because they grew up listening to it.
Yeah but then again, anyone with any appreciation for music was listening to the Pixies and Sonic Youth at one point.

Quote:
Alternative didn't mean the same back then as it does now. It was merely a term used to describe music that wasn't mainstream. Indie, before the populace bastardized it, and turned it into a genre... meant the same thing - but it took the place of alt because alt had turned into a genre.
Yes, but most genre's get 'bastardized' over time. Punk, emo, hardcore, ska...it almost seems like a natural process. There is a difference though. Indie seems to cover slightly more different styles than the term alternative did back in the 80s. Ahhh, I explained it better in the indie education thread.
__________________
hookers with machineguns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 10:02 AM   #509 (permalink)
Account Disabled
 
bungalow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hot-lanta
Posts: 3,140
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boo boo
Sonic Youth are emo??...O_O....And americans do emo better?...Last time i checked there is no UK emo scene...However, arent many emo bands influenced by UK bands such as The Cure, Joy Division, Echo And The Bunnymen, Gang Of Four, Siouxsie & the Banshees and The Smiths?
You have the most bullshit argument.
Who cares if emo bands are influenced by English bands, that isnt the point. The point is, that the United States does emo music better.

Using your logic to completely deflate your argument about The Beatles greatness, and the fact that they are British.

'Weren't the Beatles inspired by US bands such as Elvis Presly, Little Richard, Buddy Holly and The Crickets, and Chuck Berry?'

You only use that logic when it suits your argument, but then claim it isnt a valid argument when someone uses it to refute your point. Which is why I have 0 respect for you.
bungalow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 10:08 AM   #510 (permalink)
Pow!
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,671
Default

hmmmm.....right, this suggestion may be a little drug induced and a little misspelled, but thats ok. maybe, in order to s4etlle this you should list out all genres worth mentioning and give a point to whatever place does that genre better, place with most points wins, break it down rather than just saying music, keep track of each little arguement over each genre much eaqsier...
littleknowitall is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads



© 2003-2019 Advameg, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.